#1
a few hours ago i was watching tv when i heard this bang, my epi les paul had fallen off its stand and snapped at the headstock, only being held on by the top screw of the truss rod cover. My question is how much will it cost to repair (in aus dollars)?

i don't have any pics as the camera on my phones stuffed and i haven't seen a camera in the house for a while...
#2
its dead
even if you got it repaired it will sound horrible
the same thing happened to my friend
sorry
#3
^don't listen to Epirocks,he's misinformed. his friend just went to a terrible luthier. a real quality guitar repair will sound and look brand new, and the joint will be even stronger. depending on the cost of the epi it probably won't be worth the repair cost tho, esp if its a lower level one.
#4
Quote by cthuludawn21
^don't listen to Epirocks,he's misinformed. his friend just went to a terrible luthier. a real quality guitar repair will sound and look brand new, and the joint will be even stronger. depending on the cost of the epi it probably won't be worth the repair cost tho, esp if its a lower level one.



this, completely.
#5
you could try a new neck which you could order from warmoth.com
but that sucks that that happened
good luck finding a new neck
sorry about the accident though
#6
Quote by cthuludawn21
^don't listen to Epirocks,he's misinformed. his friend just went to a terrible luthier. a real quality guitar repair will sound and look brand new, and the joint will be even stronger. depending on the cost of the epi it probably won't be worth the repair cost tho, esp if its a lower level one.

hmm well its a standard and i only payed 430aus for it and i doubt theres any quality luthiers about where i live, might have to save for up a new axe.
#7
i agree with skierinanutshel and cthuludawn21 but if he has an attachment to it like it was a first guitar and things like that, i know if any thing happened to my strat id get it fixed cause it was my first guitar
#8
that must happen a lot...

just get a new one, its way too much to fix and will only worsen the sound
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#9
Quote by rtfk101
that must happen a lot...

just get a new one, its way too much to fix and will only worsen the sound


please, see above. not being rude or anything, because i dont mean to be...but yeah, see above. with a good luthier, any headstock breaking problem.....or any guitar problem for that matter, can be fixed to like-new or even better than the previous condition of the instrument. good luthiers are amazing.
#10
Try fixing it yourself before buying a new one.

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#11
Your dreaming if you think it'll be better than new! An excellent repair will bring it up to almost as good as it was, not better. Yes glued wood is stronger around the joint, but it certainly could affect resonance. This type of repair is reserved for expensive instruments usually or "special" ones you don't mind paying for to save.
Moving on.....
#12
Where in Australia are you?




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#13
It MAY be the same if it snapped before the nut. If it didn't, it is highly unlikely it will play or setup quite the same again, probably for the worse. I've played 4 or 5 guitars that have been repaired either at the nut, or between the 2nd-6th frets. The quality of the repair will also be impacted by the quality of the wood. Cheaper wood will not be as strong or dense, meaning the repair will either not last as long or have negative effects on the tone of the instrument. I don't know if this will matter or not tbh, I think it is more important when working on the body of the guitar but thought I would toss it out there.

You're deluding yourself if you think it will be better though, as the number of luthiers who could get it back to how it was, much less somehow make it better, are going to be few and far between. Another thing to consider is it may seem to play better at first, but only because it was just set up, and it's likely the guitar needed one anyway. But how it will actually play relative to how it was is anyone's guess, but based on the ones I have played that have been fixed, they tend not to be as nice. Another factor is cost. Good luthiers demand good money for work like that. It will also neuter the resale value of the guitar, so you're going to be stuck with it. Is it worth $200-300 to be stuck with a mediocre playing guitar that you 'll need to give away to sell when you can buy a new one, especially when the guitar's second-hand value is not that great to begin with? You need to decide if your emotional attachment to the guitar (IE you love it and will keep it and play it even if it is total crap) is big enough to warrant that risk/investment.
#14
If you get a new guitar, maybe try a bolt on next time? So that way if it ends up breaking again, you could just buy a whole new neck, I think. Seems like an alright idea, if you're partial to bolt on necks.
#15
A good number of vintage Gibsons, Deans, and Fender set-necks have repaired headstocks like that. It's a common fix on older acoustics well. You can Google Image Search "Broken Headstock" and a million Epiphones pop up

It is possible to do, but will be expensive. Assuming cash isn't an issue... Ed Roman (A damn good luthier shop for the record) charges $200 baseline for headstock repair. Since this is an Epiphone, you're best bet would to try and fix it yourself (Great school project) or just save up and buy a new guitar.

Repaired volutes on guitars doesn't affect tone at all. Glue doesn't vibrate like wood does, but the area in which the break occurs doesn't influence tone greatly. A good luthier can repair this and you could never tell it was broken in the first place
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#16
Quote by Flux'D

It is possible to do, but will be expensive. Assuming cash isn't an issue... Ed Roman (A damn good luthier shop for the record) charges $200 baseline for headstock repair. Since this is an Epiphone, you're best bet would to try and fix it yourself (Great school project) or just save up and buy a new guitar.

I would not trust the leprechaun with a First Act, much less anything I paid over $200 for. LOL But that price is accurate for a high end repair, maybe a hair high, dunno what that converts to in Aussie dollars.
#17
Quote by CJRocker
I would not trust the leprechaun with a First Act, much less anything I paid over $200 for. LOL But that price is accurate for a high end repair, maybe a hair high, dunno what that converts to in Aussie dollars.



Really? I've always had good luck in dealing with Ed Roman. He's a good man and his shop does great work, although a little pricey most of the time. I had the priviledge of working on a 1966 Les Paul that had a broken headstock and other various problems. I did all the work myself except the headstock and Roman only charged $275 including shipping. I took pictures of the repair, but they're lost somewhere on my hard drive lol


Back on topic: Unless it's an unusual Epi, a rare production line, or has sentimental value it probably isn't worth the cash to have it repaired.
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#18
Off topic, Ed Roman is a liar and a scammer, do not touch him with a barge pole




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#19
My job is a carpenter and if the joint is cleaned up so it goes back together tightly it will be as strong if not stronger as it was originally , lets face it as it is now it`s useless what have you got to lose? All is not lost
yes all six strings buzz !! but it`s unique isn`t it
#20
If the break is clean you should be able to fix it yourself. Take pics and show GB&C. They know their stuff in there.
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#21
Quote by Absent Mind
Off topic, Ed Roman is a liar and a scammer, do not touch him with a barge pole


Not as bad as Carlino.

You can get the headstock fixed, but it'll probably cost more than what you paid for the guitar. It wont sound the same. May sound better, may sound worse, it really all depends on the luthier.
#22
I was lucky and my Epi LP's break was very clean with a ton of surface area for the glue to hold on to. It broke at the nut to the 3rd fret. All I did was took some Titebond Original Wood Glue and smothered it in the joint. I then took clamps and clamped it tight and neat. I waited two days before I strung it up and its been perfectly fine for about 3/4 year now. Only cost me a bottle of wood glue and I have a perfectly fine guitar.
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#26
Quote by Skierinanutshel
^^^ jeepers....what happened?!


If I remember right, he fell off his bike while on the highway.
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#27
Quote by oneblackened
If I remember right, he fell off his bike while on the highway.



That's awesome, sucks though, that's a nice guitar. I don't really see how else he could break it though, unless he pulled a Pete Townshend.
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#29
i say get it fixed, my brother snapped the headstock on his gibson J-45 because of taking it out into the cold... the **** just happened, it was 50 bucks even to get it professionally repaired, the guitar sounds and feels better now than it ever did before the break
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#30
A J-45 is not an Epi! You could probably buy 3 or 4 Epis for the price of one. IF the break is clean enough and not too splintered & clampable you might get it glued back together OK. No knowledgeable player would ever buy it from you though so you have to decide whetehr it's worth fixing for yourself or investing the repair money into a new guitar w/ hardshell case. I made the mistake of leaving my American Deluxe Strat on it's stand for awhile and it ended up with a mysterious ding on the body know one knew anything about. From then on my guitars sit in their cases when I'm not actively playing them, I use a stand only to rest the guitar for a few moments during practice if I need to put it down.
For those of you who say you'll never be able to tell it was repaired, get yourself a small blacklite and inspect a guitar that's had a repair like this, it'll show up easily! The BL will also shows cracks starting before they break.
Moving on.....
#31
1)Collect broken pieces, splinters, whatever.
2)Glue em up with Titebond
3)Clamp.
4)Wipe any excess glue with wet paper towel.
5)Let it clamp for 1 day or 2 days to be safer
6)Restring.

I think those are the steps, I've seen quite a lot of broken headstock cases before.
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#33
if its an epi, if you have to pay for parts for repair and labour, depending on how long it takes, and where you get it done, it might be cheaper to just get a new epi.


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Last edited by Silver-spear94 at Feb 3, 2009,
#34
^^^ At least you could recover some of the hardware from the broken one too. (Tuners, PUs, bridge & Tailpiece, pickguard, cavity covers etc)
Moving on.....