#1
I've heard people mention implied progressions on here a few times before, and I'm kind of curious about them. I think I kind of know what people mean by an implied progression, like the notes you play indicate a particular chord without necessarily playing all of the notes. So my questions are:

1. What exactly is an implied progression

2. How would I go about writing them
#2

e|-------5-8-7-5-|-------3------|
B|-----5---------|-----3--------|
G|---5-----------|---4----------|
D|-7-------------|-5----------5-|
A|---------------|--------------|
E|---------------|----------3---|


This is an implied progression.

First bar is an Am arpeggio, and the 2nd bar is an G Major arpeggio.

No chord is played, but it's safe to say i'm "implying" Am - G.

Technically every arpeggio is implying a chord progression, because technically there's never a chord being played. (a Chord is when notes are striked simultaneously), this is also called harmony. When the notes are separate it's a melody.

The thing I tabbed out above^ is a melody, but it outline an Am - G progression hence Implying it.

To go by this, work with a lot of chord tones, and small triad arpeggio's.

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#3
I think that covers chord substitutions also...

For example using a neopolitan chord. In the key of D minor, using an Eb major instead of a G minor. It still implies a subdominant movement which is followed by a dominant. Both of the chords are predominants.

I just think of it this way. It's easier to visualize the harmonic movement.
#4
Quote by xxdarrenxx

e|-------5-7-----|
B|-----5-----5---|
G|---5---------5-|
D|-7-------------|
A|---------------|
E|---------------|



Fixed. lol.

I'm like "let's play this" and then "wait, doesn't this sound familiar...", lol.
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#5
Quote by one vision
I think that covers chord substitutions also...

For example using a neopolitan chord. In the key of D minor, using an Eb major instead of a G minor. It still implies a subdominant movement which is followed by a dominant. Both of the chords are predominants.

I just think of it this way. It's easier to visualize the harmonic movement.


Yes, it covers a lot of things. To much things for 1 post or even 1000 posts.

It has to do with smart thinking also.

Obvious implying a Major triad is generally easier then implying a m7b9 chord to just name something

Still both can be achieved by smartly implying the harmony on the chord before and after it.


Quote by SilverDark
Fixed. lol.

I'm like "let's play this" and then "wait, doesn't this sound familiar...", lol.


Really I just tabbed out something at random lolzz

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,