#1
hey, for the last long while ive been trying to get out of the habit of using the pentatonic box too much and ive kind of come up with a couple problems which hopefully youll be able to help me get to the bottom of:

in regard to playing over chords, how do i actually make my soloing follow the chords? if i just run along to that note in the scale it sounds pretty stale but i think it sounds boring or out of tune if i move up to that chord's fret and use the scale there.

and in regard to using other scales, whenever i throw in a major or minor something it normally sounds pretty much like ive just used it for the sake of using it, it never seems to actually fit around what im using. it really obviously sticks out from the tune.

hopefully ive given you all a good idea of my problems and its enough to work off.
#2
For the scales problem you need to know which key your in. Eg the key of Cmajor is easiest as it contains the notes C D E F G A B C (no sharps or flats). All these notes are part of the Cmajor scale, and so if you played a chord sequence, eg C, D, G, C that would be in the key of C and you could use any notes from the C major scale over that.
You can also use notes from the Aminor scale as this is the relative minor of C major, it is the relative minor because it contains the notes A B C D E F G A, all the same notes see!
I hope this helps with making your solos sound less stale. you can apply this method to any key.

EDIT: you dont have to use just C natural major (full major scale) or A natural minor (full minor scale). You can use the pentatonic versions of both etc. and on both octaves (12 frets/8tones above the original root note).
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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Last edited by charlie__flynn at Feb 2, 2009,
#3
Sounds to me like your just playing notes because you think you should. Learn what each note sounds like over each chord, and then pick which sounds you want.

Sure you can just go up and down the scale as fast as you can and it will fit, but that's not music.

Here's an excercise that I spent months on.

Get a recording or a freind to play a chord progression, and solo only using the third of each chord. Do this until your comfortable, then add the root, then add the fifth. Eventually you will start to hear what each note sounds like and you will be better able to pick the notes you want instead of shooting in the dark.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
thanks to both of you for your advice.
something i didnt understand about your advice though sophist, you say you solo using only the third of each chord. surely that means youre just playing the third of each chord?
cheers.
#5
I think that he means that say if the chord progression was G D A C G then you could only use the thirds of each of those chords, not neceserily the third of G overthe chord of G. but it can be over any of the chords.
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#6
Quote by kthxbi
if i just run along to that note in the scale it sounds pretty stale but i think it sounds boring or out of tune if i move up to that chord's fret and use the scale there.


Chords, like scales, aren't located at a fret -- they're all over the fretboard. Maybe you should learn the arpeggiated finger positions for chord triads. There's different variations, but one of them has 5 positions just like pentatonics or CAGED positions.
#7
Quote by kthxbi
thanks to both of you for your advice.
something i didnt understand about your advice though sophist, you say you solo using only the third of each chord. surely that means youre just playing the third of each chord?
cheers.


Sure, that's a great start to following the chords and being more aware of where they are and how to get from chord tone to chord tone.

Basically I'd suggest your problems are more to do with phrasing and understanding WHY to play notes, rather than a matter of not being able to play a scale or chord, if you follow. Try the phrasing article in my sig and watching "Melodic Control" by Marty Freidman.