#1
I got a Fender Starcaster and when i push the tremolo bar down, my G string goes out of tune, and sometimes does the D string. Any suggestions to this? That kinda pisses me off when i use the whammy bar and then i do for example C5 and it sounds horrible.
#2
This is a frequent problem with non-locking trems...maybe put some locking tuners and a graphite nut on it? I don't know...there could be an intonation problem as well. If it goes out of tune after one dive bomb this might be the problem.
#3
Have you just put new strings on? if so make sure you stretch them (pull em away from the 12th fret pretty tight for aboiut 60secs each then tune back up) make sure theyre wound around the tuning peg at least 3 times.

If not you could think about installing locking tuners, gotoh do good ones.
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#4
yeah id go with some locking tuners

my mate has a strat keeps going out of tune
stuck some locking tuners on it
sorted it right out
#5
Thanks, gonna try stretching 'em, if the problem continues gonna try with a graphite nut.
Last edited by haroldsoto30 at Feb 2, 2009,
#7
Quote by charlie__flynn
Have you just put new strings on? if so make sure you stretch them (pull em away from the 12th fret pretty tight for aboiut 60secs each then tune back up) make sure theyre wound around the tuning peg at least 3 times.

If not you could think about installing locking tuners, gotoh do good ones.


What actually matters is that the windings are tight, and that one of them is above the part of string that goes through the hole and the other two winds are above it. That way, the tension of the tuned string clamps down tightly on the portion of the string going through the tuner hole.
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#8
You might need to adjust your suspension in the back as well, and if its a squire strat that may not even help...
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#9
my dean kept having that problem, at first i figured well "its just a crappy starter guitar, ill just deal with it" well then it started to get on my nerves, so i took the strings off and rubbed some graphite in the nut cause its not a graphite nut and that seemed to help for about 6 months then it started up again, so i decided to put locking tuners on it, and not even a day after i said that it started staying in tune, hasnt gone out by more than a half step anymore , morale of the story, threaten your guitars to mke them do what you want lol
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#10
This could be due two any combination of a number of things mentioned above,

1) strings not properly stretched
2) strings binding/slipping at the nut
3) string wraps slipping/binding/rolling over on the tuning post

these are the top 3 culprits, could be more going on then that, but not likely.
stretch the strings until they're stable when you change them (until they quit going out of tune, takes a few times/tries, sometimes DAYS depending on the brand, LOL).

Add graphite lube to the nut slots (this can be done by rubbing a sharp pencil thru them, or by using products like BigBends nut sauce). commonly the strings will slide thru the nut one direction then pinch on the way back, or pinch then suddenly release due to tension. This can usually be heard, alerting you to the problem. Add lube every time you change strings.

make sure strings have at least (but not too many more) good consecutive (non overlapping) wraps on the post http://www.bryankimsey.com/stringing/Stringing_prewrap3.JPG (not quite enough wraps, but you get the idea)
Sit down with your guitar and try to find the exact cause of the problem before spending money or performing surgery, if you can't find & fix the problem then look into investing in locking tuners, graphite/roller nuts and so on. Remember vintage style tremolo's aren't really made for anything more then adding a slow, wide vibrato to your playing, not for dives or other whammy-bar stunts. Hope this helps.
Last edited by oldkoolairbrush at Feb 2, 2009,