#1
Interestingly enough, I searched about 6-7 different terms and couldn't find any info on this.

I know the traditional way to finish a maple board is to fret it, dress the ends, then clear coat the whole shebang and scrape off the lacquer from the frets once it's dried, but I have questions:

What do you scrape it off with?

Is there a different way to do this than clearing the whole thing and then scraping? I've heard of people taping off the frets before clear coating to avoid the scraping process, but that seems a bit wonky.

Has anyone finished a maple fingerboard with clear before that would care to share thier advice?
#2
I think taping the fret's would actaully be the the best way, if you tape them up like your going to do a scallop on the neck, but make it really tight up against the fret and really neat. It'd be more effort before coating it, but it'd be way easier, becuase if you're scraping the frets after you could damage them or even worse rub some of the clearcoat off the maple.
Black Knight CF-60F Semi-Acoustic.

Black Knight CP200 (Red flamed maple).

Neck-thru 4 string bass.

Acoustic 6 string.
#3
Since we are on the subject. Where do you get the lacquer to recoat it? I've got a maple neck that I need to relacquer.

What grit do you use on the fingerboard to resurface?

/hijack :P
#4
if the fretboard is ass, i sand the finish off, make sure its perfect, put the frets in, refinish the neck with lacquer/poly whatever, then make sure its perfectly dry, i do all of the fretwork with the fingerboard taped off, which removes all of the spray from the frets, then i go in with 1000 grit/2400 grit wet paper to sand the fretboard nice and shiny.
#5
Quote by LP Addict
if the fretboard is ass, i sand the finish off, make sure its perfect, put the frets in, refinish the neck with lacquer/poly whatever, then make sure its perfectly dry, i do all of the fretwork with the fingerboard taped off, which removes all of the spray from the frets, then i go in with 1000 grit/2400 grit wet paper to sand the fretboard nice and shiny.


But then how do you get the frets flush on the sides if the lacquer is there? And dress them and stuff? Won't that leave a bunch of ugly marks and stuff in the lacquer on the side of the neck?
#6
I'm with LP on this one. He's talking about very fine SP. Tape around, so just the frets are in play.
You should only have some very small scratches(if any). If you must, use a 000 brush, fill in the scratches with lacquer, and sand very carefully(Blend)w/1800+SP. If anyone notices that, tell them you're a slob, and ask if they can do better. I'm willing to bet they can't.
#7
Not sure if this is what you wanted, but get the finest grade of steel wool you can find 00# or 000# and go to town on those frets. I've done this on guitars with green frets that came out shiny and looking brand new. It is THE best method for cleaning the frets themselves.

EDIT: This is probably NOT what you wanted. I misread the title and went straight to commenting. I'll leave it up just in case it is of SOME help.
Last edited by travistag at Feb 2, 2009,
#8
Hahaha thanks for the steel wool tip, I'm already a major subscriber to that method. I use #0000 for polishing though and then metal polish afterward.


Anywhoo, I just ran across a thread on the tele forums that said to clear everything then tape off the board + steel wool the frets. I think that's pretty much what LP said only he uses sandpaper, and that seems like the way to go. Thanks everyone!
#11
Quote by travistag
Haha, sorry about ALL of the CAPS. I don't know WHAT I was thinking...



we have the SAME brain, I do that ALL the TIME.


Seriously though, I DO.