#1
After an enjoyable trip to the Guitar Amp Keyboard Center, I'm now the proud owner of this beautiful new guitar:

The Godin LGX-SA AAA:



Solid mahogany body
Honduras mahogany neck
AAA flamed maple top
Ebony fingerboard (22 frets and 25,5" scale)
Graphtech Tusq nut
Front loaded locking tuners
Seymour Duncan pickups (SH II Jazz and Custom III)
Built in Piezo with an on board three band graphic EQ
13-pin out (used in combination with a synth or other 13-pin devices)


Let's have some more pics:

A closer look at the body:



The headstock with front loading locking tuners:



3-band EQ for the Piezo pickups:



The rear:



A full shot of the back:



The bridge:



The side (notice the sculpted back of the lower horn):




This guitar is absolutely amazing in terms of looks, playability and sound.

The stock Duncan pickups aren't too hot, but they can handle distortion quite well and the Piezo works like a charm.

For those of you unfamiliar with Piezo pickups, essentially they're really small pickups (one for each string), which are built into the bridge saddles. Rather than using magnets like traditional pickups they use pressure. When combined with a pre-amp these pickups have a really bright and jangly tone similar to that of an acoustic guitar.

The neck is oil finished and made of Honduras mahogany. My other guitars all have finished or maple necks, so this is a bit different. The profile is quite comfy; it's not too thick, but not too thin, either. The combination with an ebony fingerboard and a solid mahogany body results in a heavy, but warm sounding guitar, despite the large route for the electronics.

It stays in tune perfectly thanks to Godin's own locking tuners. It's a bit of a different design when compared to conventional locking tuners, but it seems to work like a charm.


All in all I'm really impressed with this guitar; it's got heaps of sustain and some pretty cool on board electronics.


Of course there is one more thing: the 13-pin output. It allows you to hook it up to any 13-pin device you'd like, for instance a guitar synth.

So I bought this as a companion:

The Roland VG-99:




This thing is literally unbelievable.


The VG-99 has three big advantages over a lot of other guitar synths:

-you can tweak pretty much everything
-a lot of the features are easy to use (you just plug it in and play; if you can't figure out how to do something the manual can be quite clear and helpful)
-there's no noticeable tracking delay

At the moment I haven't got any videos or sound clips of my own yet, since I'm slightly busy and still playing around with it, although I'll try and get some up soon.

In the meantime you can check out the demo videos on Rolandus.com or on youtube.


Since I can't list everything it does, here are a few things:

-Alternate tunings:

It has several built in alternate tunings (a few open ones, DADGAD, Nashville, etc.), which can be used on any patch. You can also create your own (like EEEEEE or CGCGCE). You simply press the alternate tuning button, select the one you want and your done. After about three seconds your guitar is in a different tuning.

It's a cool feature because it allows you to change to virtually any tuning you want in a matter of seconds. Usually when I take the time to physically tune to something like DADGAD I get tired of it quite quickly and have to tune back again, which is a hassle I can now avoid .

These alternate tunings also sound damned convincing despite the fact they're completely digital.


-Twelve string mode:

You can turn all the available guitar models (Strat, Tele, L4, Les Paul, etc.) into twelve strings.

-Two instrument mode:

You can play two different instruments (even with different amps and effects) at the same time. For instance, you could put a Strat on track A and a sitar or a banjo on track B.

Certain patches allow you to use dynamics to determine the balance between channel A and B (the harder you play, the more you'll shift to the other channel).

There also a few patches which combine instruments on the same track. There's one where the bottom two strings are the same as on a bass guitar, but with the top four strings of an archtop. This gives you the option of playing your own bass lines.

-D-Beam and Ribbon controller:

Two of Roland's new controllers.

The D-Beam is similar to a Theremin. It has few different modes and it can be used as a whammy bar, a filter, an octaver and some other stuff too. One of the coolest modes is "Freeze". When using certain patches, you can play a note or a chord and when you wave something through the beam (your hand or the neck of your guitar for example) it sustains whatever you were playing, allowing you to play something over the top.

The Ribbon controller is a bit like a touch screen and can be used for a few different things (like a filter or to raise/lower pitch).

-Actual instrument patches:

Some patches don't just sound like the instrument they're modeled after, but they change the tuning of your guitar as well. "5 string banjo" for example turns the low E off, tunes the A string to a high drone and tunes the D, G, B and E strings in the same intervals as a normal banjo.

There's also a preset called "Brown sugar" which sounds like a Tele in open G, but without the low E.


I could go on and on.


I'm really, really pleased with this set. The tracking's fantastic, it doesn't sound too digital, since the GK pickup is built in on the Godin you don't need to install a bulky GK-3 on another instrument and the guitar itself plays like a dream.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Feb 2, 2009,
#3
that guitar is sweeet
thats the kind of spec youd find on custom shop guitars, hows the fretboard, i havent seen many 22 fret 25.5 scales
Quote by Td_Nights
*Points to Above Poster*

Best. Username. Ever.

Quote by _-Joey-_
I wish I was gay...


PSN- td_rules Steam- tdrules
#5
That guitar looks amazing.

How much did it cost you?
I know now what I knew then, but I didn't know then what I know now
#6
Quote by tdrules
that guitar is sweeet
thats the kind of spec youd find on custom shop guitars, hows the fretboard, i havent seen many 22 fret 25.5 scales


The fretboard's great; I don't mind the fact there's only 22 frets.

The neck features what Godin calls their "Ergocut technique", which is their way of creating a worn-in feel.

Quote by Rob_b_543
that is a sexy guitar. i want one!


Thanks

Quote by Zigler9
That guitar looks amazing.


Thank you.

Quote by Zigler9
How much did it cost you?


Suffices to say, a lot
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Feb 2, 2009,
#7
pretty sweet looking guitar dude.
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
#8
Quote by Led Head
pretty sweet looking guitar dude.


Thanks

It also comes in an AA maple top version, but I'm glad I went for this one
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#9
badass. nice colour too.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
I'm really gelous , that looks amazing , also didn't know the Roland VG was that great , I allways thougt it was sort of a scam , certainly gonna try to buy one.
Enjoy your new toys .
#11
Quote by tdrules
that guitar is sweeet
thats the kind of spec youd find on custom shop guitars, hows the fretboard, i havent seen many 22 fret 25.5 scales


hmmmm...Strats and Teles?

But dude, that's an awesome guitar and the VG99 looks amazing. It's very convenient that your guitar comes with piezo pickups so you don't need that ugly GK3
#12
Quote by JELIFISH19
hmmmm...Strats and Teles?

But dude, that's an awesome guitar and the VG99 looks amazing. It's very convenient that your guitar comes with piezo pickups so you don't need that ugly GK3

He could've hardly seen any Strats and Teles.

Congratulations on the new guitar and synth, bonsai. The Godin looks really really nice.
#14
I've wanted one of those for a while I'm jealous of you.. make sure to add clips!
I pay for music and so should you: http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/ipayformusic

Quote by Music18
u just got to love fat strats.... and i really like the ones that hav 2 single pick upsm then the humbucker near the bridge... very nice =)
#15
Thanks for all the kind comments.

I'm planning on adding some sound clips/videos in the very near future, but I'm a bit busy at the moment

Quote by JELIFISH19
It's very convenient that your guitar comes with piezo pickups so you don't need that ugly GK3


Part of the reason why I decided to go for this combination is because the Godin has the Roland pickup built in.

The GK's always look so bulky and out of place...
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Feb 3, 2009,
#16
Wait, you got 3 band EQ in your guitar, That is sweet. Very nice guitar.
My Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Peavey Vypyr 30
DW Collector's 3 pc drums
Mapex Black panther snare
Sabian AAX/Zildjian K cymbals.
#17
Is the VG99 really easier to use than previous stuff? I tried a VG88 in a pawn shop once, just testing it with no pickup plugged in, and it seemed like a pain in the ass. Btw, how convincing are the string sounds, and general synth sounds? I've been interested in them, but am having a hard time rationalizing saving up for one due to the price tag.
#18
how polyphonic is it? can it handle chords well/at all?
Gear:
Modded Steinberger Spirit (white) (SD-AH/EMG Select)
Modded Steinberger GP-2R (white) (EMG81/60)
Peavey XXL head
Hughes and Kettner Cream Machine
Hughes and Kettner Blues Master
#19
Sexy finish on the guitar, don't really like the inlays though. Bet it plays really well.
My Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
EHX Metal Muff
Peavey Valvking 112
Boss ME-50
Holy Grail Reverb
#20
Quote by CephalidHunter
how polyphonic is it? can it handle chords well/at all?


Yes, although it slightly depends on the patch.

Nearly all of the factory presets can handle chords just fine; especially the not too complex ones (like twelve strings and such).

Quote by CJRocker
Is the VG99 really easier to use than previous stuff? I tried a VG88 in a pawn shop once, just testing it with no pickup plugged in, and it seemed like a pain in the ass. Btw, how convincing are the string sounds, and general synth sounds? I've been interested in them, but am having a hard time rationalizing saving up for one due to the price tag.


I haven't tried the VG 88 but I love the ease of use of the VG 99; without having read large sections of the manual I've been able to tweak most of the stuff I want and the 200 built in presets are designed to work well without any further adjustment.

You can select the pickup type (GK2, 3 or Piezo) and then it's pretty much plug and play for the most part. Unless you want to get into serious tweaking, that is. I'm still pretty inexperienced with this thing when it comes to really fine tuning the sound (I've only played it for a few hours), but I haven't encountered anything that wasn't easily found in the manual. Like I said before, I'm slightly busier than usual at the moment, so I still need to sit down and make my own guitar models/patches...

So far I'm really liking it, though.

As for string sounds, it really focuses on guitar and similar instruments. The synth sounds that are built in work fine (no tracking problems), but it doesn't have 20 types of piano. The preset synth patches are very nice, though. So far I reckon the sort of traditional organ sound and the pipe organ are among my favorites in the "non-guitar" category


Of course you can use the "Guitar to MIDI" feature to drive any synth you want.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Feb 3, 2009,