#1
Is it possible to repair a broken power supply? (accidentally plugged my px-2 power supply into my ibanez wah pedal instead of my line 6 uber metal dist., luckily both pedals are working fine)
Im guessing no, and if thats the case then im going to have to drop $20 on a new one. Actually, rather than buying a new one, would it be better to get one that powers a bunch of pedals?
I am probably going to be buying more pedals in the future, but if i fried my power supply by connecting it to the wrong pedal, how do those power supplies that connect to multiple pedals work?
#2
i wouldn't go poking around my power supply. a new one seems like its on the cards. i don't know how your power supply was broken instead of the pedal though. kinda weird.
#4
Quote by Thean4rchist
Is it possible to repair a broken power supply? (accidentally plugged my px-2 power supply into my ibanez wah pedal instead of my line 6 uber metal dist., luckily both pedals are working fine)
Im guessing no, and if thats the case then im going to have to drop $20 on a new one. Actually, rather than buying a new one, would it be better to get one that powers a bunch of pedals?
I am probably going to be buying more pedals in the future, but if i fried my power supply by connecting it to the wrong pedal, how do those power supplies that connect to multiple pedals work?

This seems to be the standard 'round here.

Usually you fry the pedal by plugging in the wrong power supply, not the power supply itself.
#5
Power "bricks" like that are usually easy to fix if you know your way around that kind of stuff, otherwise just replace it at that price point. You can use any supply with any pedal provided the voltage is the same and it can supply enough current, you do have to make sure polarity at the plug end is correct.

Having played with slot cars for a while, I use an old Tyco "Wall Wart" that I added a regulator and filter to so I can adjust it to whatever I need 3-15V. Actually I built it to test cars but if I'm in a pedal mood I throw a plug or two on the end and I'm good to go.

Multi-pedal supplies should (but don't always) have reversable outputs, if all your pedals are 9 volts you just have to worry about plug polarity.
My Stuff:
Austin Strat Copy - Lefty
(New and Improved with Bill Lawrence 290/280 Pickups)
MIM Telecaster - Lefty
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
TS-9 with a few mods
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah
#6
Yeah, it really confused me too that my pedals were okay. When i plugged it into the wah it powered on for a while and after a few seconds the "on" light faded away, thats when i noticed i was using the wrong power supply. I then connected it to the right pedal but it doesnt turn on anymore, but both pedals are working since i tossed 9v batteries in them to check.
#7
Quote by SwamperGene
Power "bricks" like that are usually easy to fix if you know your way around that kind of stuff, otherwise just replace it at that price point. You can use any supply with any pedal provided the voltage is the same and it can supply enough current, you do have to make sure polarity at the plug end is correct.

Having played with slot cars for a while, I use an old Tyco "Wall Wart" that I added a regulator and filter to so I can adjust it to whatever I need 3-15V. Actually I built it to test cars but if I'm in a pedal mood I throw a plug or two on the end and I'm good to go.

Multi-pedal supplies should (but don't always) have reversable outputs, if all your pedals are 9 volts you just have to worry about plug polarity.


its actually the current and not the voltage that will fry your pedal.