#1
to anyone who earns through MUSIC can you please answer the following questions, if you have time^^ because this is for my assignment in school pls help^^

1. What is your job
2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career?
3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work?
4. What education did you need to prepare for what ou are doing?
5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work?
6. What is your favorite part of your job?
7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career?
8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job?
9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry?

Thank you if you answered the questions it will help me a lot^^
#3
1. Musician
2. I liked music more than anything
3. Determination and people skills
4. Public speaking; the ability to get along with people
5. Play a show, write a song
6. Playing the shows
7. I don't have to work (it's not work to me)
8. Serious attitude (determination)
9. Figuring out who is straight up (who keeps it real lol)
10. Try your best, never be passive, foster relationships

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#4
1. What is your job
I teach guitar.
2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career?
It's not my career, it's part time to earn some money, and I'm doing something I like.
3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work?
Hmmm..I need to be acquainted with my students. Sometimes they want to learn a certain passage or riff from a song, and I need to transcribe it so I can teach them it + the theory and/or thought process behind it (Like what makes that riff so special, or why does these chords work etc.)
4. What education did you need to prepare for what you are doing?
Well, I need to know how to play guitar. I have contact with a lot of "professional" music teachers, and I ask them about stuff, and I made sure I know what I know is right.
5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work?
A student comes in, we talk a bit, asking how his week was. Then I ask if he found something he wanted to learn or what not (I often lend cd's to students to let them hear other music). Off all my students I know their skill level, so we will often pick up where he has "flaws" in his technique. Their really is no "typical" day that they all share, except playing guitar. We also often end with a small jam to work on improvisation at the end of the lesson.
6. What is your favourite part of your job?
If a students learns me something I did not know or could do yet
7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career?
I went to a gig from a student's band and got free entrance(guest list) and free drinks. I liked that
8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job?
Be well educated, prepared, and 'lay all ur cards down on the table' sorta speak. If you have a new student, tell him what you can and what you can't do, and be honest. I can't do Jazz very well, so if someone asks me if I can teach him Jazz, I will say no, and I'd recommend him to someone I know who can.
9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
Patience. I have a feeling that this goes for any teachers in any field.
10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry? I know some people in the music industry, and I have some understanding on how they cope, but I have no personal advice.

Thank you if you answered the questions it will help me a lot^^


Np

Darren J. T.,

Amsterdam

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#6
I'll answer these later tonight as I have to get off to work at the moment.

1. What is your job?

Middle-school instrumental music teacher. Well.... last year, I was. This year, I'm back in the classroom.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
1. What is your job rapper
2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career? girls, money
3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work? rapping
4. What education did you need to prepare for what ou are doing? rapping practice
5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work? **** bitches rap
6. What is your favorite part of your job? bitches and money
7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career? bitches and money
8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job? rapping skills
9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job? rap shows, hoes
10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry? **** bitches get money
Last edited by 420weedman at Feb 3, 2009,
#8
1. What is your job

Middle school/high school instrumental music teacher.

2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career?

I really got to love music in high school, and wanted to do something serious with it. I also wanted a career that offered stability. My high school music teacher was one of those inspiring people who made me want to follow in his footsteps. I did a co-op placement in grade 12 that had me working in a classroom and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work?

Organization, planning, self-control, humour, understanding, compassion, managing behaviour, listening, problem-solving, mediating, demonstrating instrumental music techniques (embouchure, fingerings, etc.), maturity, responsibility, accountability.... mostly people/professional skills, moreso than musical skills.

4. What education did you need to prepare for what ou are doing?

Honours degree (4 years) in music (B. Mus) and a Bachelor of Education. (1yr - gets you your Ontario Teachers' Certificate)

5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work?

Haha... define "normal." Yard/hallway duties, concert band or choir practice at lunch, phoning parents, planning, marking after school.... most days too busy with all the little things to even eat lunch. Prep time? preparing lessons, scheduling meetings, planning field trips/concerts, printing programs for concerts, conferencing with principal or other teachers in my voluntary role as union steward, marking, repairing instruments, doing report cards, making sure Individualized Education Plans are developed and implemented, on and on and on.... Certainly way too much to do than can possibly be accomplished between 9-5.

6. What is your favorite part of your job?

Bringing them to the computer lab to work with sequencers and creating their own compositions; getting the kids who are interested really involved and making music a part of their lives; the vibe in the room when the class just locks in and catches the groove of a piece

7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career?

Students who confide in you; parents who write letters or make phone calls that say "thanks for caring." Student progress like when they earn a medal at a band competition, making recordings of performances.


8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job?


Strong musical background - good ear, ability to read in multiple clefs, knowledge of how to play various percussion, brass, woodwind instruments. Strong professional and personal skills. See above.

9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

Not giving up on the students who don't want to learn. Working for a principal who is an idiot.

10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry?

Most importantly, you *have* to want to do it because you want to teach. If you're in it for the holidays and the money, it will eat you alive in no time.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Feb 3, 2009,
#9
Ive made a ****load of money in one evening playing for tips in downtown Austin from a generator

like. 350$

apart from that i've done a few lessons, i don't do it anymore.

been paid like 25$ for a gig, have played lots of gigs.. just generally dont get paid
#10
1. What is your job - Guitar instructor. I've also earned money buy playing out.

2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career? - All I ever wanted to do was play my guitar.

3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work? - Transcribing songs, teaching theory, improvisation, improving technique, etc.

4. What education did you need to prepare for what ou are doing? - I went to a music school, (Music Tech of Minneapolis). And I practiced my *** off.

5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work? - Teaching individual lessons, usually about 10 per day.

6. What is your favorite part of your job? - Teaching the student who truly wants to learn the instrument rather than just learn songs. Exposing students to new music.

7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career? - I've been lucky enough to play in front of some huge crowds. I've opened for some national bands, (including my favorite, King's X). I've done numerous recording projects. And I've made lots of really good friends through teaching and playing in bands.

8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job? - You have to be able to play well. You must be patient. You've got to know your instrument and be able to explain it clearly.

9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job? - Sometimes its learning a difficult lick or solo. Other times it's motivating a lazy student. In a band situation, you have arguments, members with bad practice habits, and occasionally substance problems.

10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry? - PRACTICE!!! Use the time you have now wisely. Meaning learn theory, scales, chords, and arpeggios. Develop your ear. Use a metronome. Play with and learn from as many musicians as you can. Stay out of debt. Follow your heart. If you want to play blues, play blues. If you want to be a punk rocker, do it. Don't follow trends just because they're popular at the moment. The music that lasts, is the music that the artist truly feels and believes in. If you're in it for the money, you're going to be disappointed. Odds are you're not going to be rich. But if you do it because you love it, you'll be happy.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#11
1. What is your job
I am a band tutor at an Intermediate school, and a composer

2. What made you decide on pursuing your job as a career?

Always wanted to write music and play in bands. Teaching is a part time gig for me (I'm still at uni) and is not something I'd do for the rest of my life, but it's good fun helping out kids and composing is something I've just always wanted to do since I saw my first movie at the cinema.

3. What are some skills that you are called upon to use daily in work?

Working with teams and groups etc.
For composing...long hours of concentration and sometimes frustration. Of course all the basic stuff like self motivation, communication, etc. etc. etc. Sitting in front of a sequencer and notating, sometimes running to the piano for an occasional idea, but mainly I write from what's in my head.

4. What education did you need to prepare for what you are doing?

I am third year at university, but basically it's just having a musical background, learning instruments, theory, years of practice, etc. Formal education is not required in most cases but you do have to have some sort of education, even if it is self taught/out of the system.

5. What is a normal day for you in your line of work?
For teaching, I am a band tutor so basically what you see in the movie School of Rock is exactly what I do, including prepping the bands for a school battle of the bands once a year. I help the kids learn the songs, help arrange them, teach them tricks and things like that, get them going with stage presence, band communication, all the essential stuff. This is in their lunch times, sometimes after schools.

For composing, when I am scoring something major like a film or a game (I have an XBox title coming up soon and just finished a feature film), sometimes I will be working 12 hour days, maybe more. I usually like to write later in the day so sometimes I start writing in the afternoon and work til pretty late/early the next morning, depending on what I have on the next day. Some days if I am not feeling it, I won't write, or I'll only do a bit. Other days I'll go crazy for 12 hours at a time, usually forgetting to eat, sleep, etc. :P

So if I'm writing a new track, first thing I'll do is talk with the director/producer/whoever it's for, or read the email they sent me again, and make sure I'm on the right page. Sometimes I'll go sit on the piano for an hour or two and just let myself go, see what I can come up with. Othertimes I'll have an idea in my head. Usually once I have the first few bars in mind, the rest is easy. Sometimes all it takes is a few chords or a motif or idea to get there, and then the rest will just come to me as I'm writing.

6. What is your favorite part of your job?

Teaching - When the band starts to sound really cool and the kids are rocking out, having fun, wanting to learn more. This is the best part. Sometimes it takes a little while for them to get comfortable but once it gells it's great.

Composing - When I get a really cool track happening. Sometimes you just come up with something that you really like and that's a cool feeling, especially if the person the music is for really likes it.

7. What are some of the personal rewards to have come throughout your career?
When people appreciate the work you do.

8. What are the pre-requisites for someone entering your job?

For band tutoring, experience playing in bands, knowing how to play multiple instruments (I play keys/guitar/bass/drums/sax/sing/etc.) or at least some information on them so you can help the students out. Experience with arranging, producing, knowing what sounds good, what doesn't, how to fix problems on the spot, knowing some basic stuff about recording/live sound, just general stuff like P.A's, EQ, reverb, etc. You don't need to go too in depth, but it's nice to know a bit more than you need to for the job.

Having good ear skills is a big one, the ability to hear a song and quickly learn to play it by ear is a big one. Of course for really difficult stuff with lots of riffs and clicks etc. you might want to resort to tabs or sheet music.

Also being able to come up with cool little parts on the spot, for keyboard, guitar, bass, or harmonies, etc. is a big help.

For composing for films or games, you need to know your stuff. You don't need to be a "theory master" or a virtuoso at any instrument. Some of the top guys working in the business never studied at college or anything, but you need to know what sounds good, you need to obviously have a lot of practice. I spend quite a few years doing free jobs scoring dozens of short films, independent games, etc. before I started making any kind of money. You have to also know your way around a sequencer and have a decent number of sounds to play with - whatever your style is.

You can specialize in one area, for example you could write mainly rock based material, or you could do orchestral, better yet, both, and other genres as well, experience with some electronica etc always helps. As long as you can produce quality tracks you can get a job.

9. What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

With teaching, the only time it gets difficult is when you have someone who doesn't want to learn. I haven't really come across that yet, I'm young (19) so I'm not really seen as some crazy old guy, hence it's pretty easy to get along with the kids. They can be a noisy lot though!

With composing, sometimes you are faced with insane deadlines. Once I got a call from a guy who said..."Can you write me something in 4 hours". I was like...Sure... It was for a short promo to show to some investors and they left music to the last minute. I had worked with the director on one of his other short films and he was a cool guy so I gave it a shot, and got the work done!

If there's one thing I've learned how to do that is work fast. Once I get the idea, it's all go from there. Not everything is tight deadlines but it's good to be able to work under pressure.

10. Any advice to a young person such as myself who is starting their own career in the music industry?

I'm young too. But start now. Start when you can. There's no saying what you could and couldn't do - that is completely up to you. If you want to write, get into it. Get a sequencer, get the sample libraries, start making tracks, get a website, etc. Anyone reading this feel free to PM or email me for specifics, I'd be happy to help.

But whatever it is you want to do - just do it. A lot of people sit around all day waiting for a break or someone to "find them". That's stupid. I'm not saying you can't get a break, but you gotta get out there. If you're a band, play shows all the time. If you write, write every day. Send your stuff to the world. Follow your dreams and work hard. Do what you love, and it won't be a job.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Feb 4, 2009,