#1
As far as I know, building speed on the guitar has to do with the connection of your mind and your fingers. So I started thinking...I have http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonverbal_learning_disorder

So could that affect my playing and can take away the possibility of becoming a professional on my instrument?
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
how do you find out if you have that or not? did you have to take tests for it?
The Real Deal Holyfield
#3
Hmmm maybe.

Speed came from me quite natural.


I literally get scared at all the practice routines off people here to develop speed. Me thinks if I would do that, I'd be like supersonic lol.


Some people connect faster, this is partly based on intelligence.

Intelligence doesn't mean knowledgeable.

It just means you need more time to acquire the knowledge/get the technique down etc.

So no, it won't hinder you to become professional musician, unless you have a mental block, but even a retarded person can learn stuff, only he needs 10 years what you learn in 1 year.

It will just take longer yes. It's up to you whether you want to spend more time for the same results in this.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 3, 2009,
#5
Quote by 08L1V10N
As far as I know, building speed on the guitar has to do with the connection of your mind and your fingers. So I started thinking...I have http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonverbal_learning_disorder

So could that affect my playing and can take away the possibility of becoming a professional on my instrument?



Do you enjoy playing?

Do you enjoy how it sounds when you play?

If the answer is yes, then I wouldn't worry about it.
#6
Quote by 08L1V10N

So could that affect my playing and can take away the possibility of becoming a professional on my instrument?


It's possible, but when people start reading about disorders, they tend to think they have them.

The thing is, training your fingers and learning guitar can be broken down into a single very simple concept: do the right thing, and do it often enough.

That's really all there is to it. In fact, it's about the only thing you actually have any control of.

The main things preventing that in most people (because it certainly doesn't SOUND like that's what they do) is: lack of faith in the process and lack of patience. So, what they end up doing is: the wrong thing, too often. That ends up being why how long you've played doesn't really mean anything in terms of your advancement.

You just have to do that one, simple thing and let the time takes what it takes. That's actually the quickest way.
#7
From what I just read on Wikipedia it appears you may have some disadvantages but probably also some advantages over the rest of us. I have no knowledge of the disorder other than the info on Wikipedia although I do have a background in primary health practice and have done a lot of work on the physical/mental aspects of guitar playing (check out my site www.tuneup.com.au).

Firstly is says that it affects your gross motor skills, these are thing like walking, waving your arms around. A guitarists uses mainly fine motor skills to move fingers around the guitar so unless they are affected also there's no issue there.

It affects the right side brain functions so visual-spatial relations that many guitarists rely on to learn scale shapes and fingerboard patterns will be more difficult. This is, in my view, a good thing. Too many guitarists rely on these pictures and neglect focusing on the sounds of scales, chords etc. The flip side of this difficulty for you is that your aural perception is better so your not relying on the boxes and your ability to hear scales etc is improved. You can't rely so much on the easy path and playing may be a bit harder initially if you approach it the same way most of us do but that will turn out to be of major benefit. Use your ears more than your eyes, try to focus on the sound that a movement or hand position makes, not the shape. There are some exercises on my site to help with this.

You also have better rote memory skills, this is a big advantage, especially once you develop your improved aural capacity. At the end of the day you use what you've got I guess, the same as the rest of us. We all bring something different to the instrument which is why we all play it differently.

And playing will be a great way to deal with the emotional stresses associated with it. Learn some blues.
#9
Thanks, actually I really have the disorder. It has been tested.
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#10
Personally, I'd not put a high degree of concern in that (or any at all). Science and medicine love classifying and pigeonholing things they don't particularly understand at any fundamental level. Whatever seems to fit the formulas, and whatever certain groups/individuals want "discovered", because that's what they fund, get "discovered". Like almost any organization of groups of people, it's highly political and essentially corrupt and based on fear -- if you propose something new, no matter how logical or worthy of some investigation, if it doesn't "conform" or upsets the pet theories of the established, your career can be over in a blink of an eye. Just look at modern "health care". It's FOR PROFIT. How could they possibly have YOUR best interests in mind?

Operate from reality: inside you is unlimited potential. It's waiting to be tapped if you go looking for it. I don't think you can go wrong with that outlook. There's no value in the other one.
#11
^That's an incredibly cynical view that diminishes the heart and soul many doctors and scientists put into simply trying to help people.

If you really do have that disorder then I can think of two options that aren't necessarily mutually exclusive
1. choose not to be limited and do whatever you need to in order to overcome your disadvantages.
2. find a group or community of people that share the same challenge and discuss it with them. They will be able to tell you what they have been able to accomplish and give you a better guide as to whether it has held other people back when learning musical instruments than anyone here that has never heard of it before.

Best of Luck.
Si
#14
He said he has been tested, it's not self-diagnosed, it's not something some medico made up, give the guy a break.

We don't all fit into the same mould and the same solutions don't work for everyone.
#15
Quote by J.A.M
You can't self-diagnose mental disorders.


No, but that's not what I'm doing. It's professionaly tested by doctors specified in NLD
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
^That's an incredibly cynical view that diminishes the heart and soul many doctors and scientists put into simply trying to help people.
.


Not really. I'm talking about institutions more than individuals.

Anyway, in retrospect, it's not a line of discussion I should have started here. My point was, it doesn't necessarily have to be the final word on believing you're limited on guitar.
#18
Quote by J.A.M
OH RIGHT, I thought you said


Ok, I should've placed an comma or something or three dots. But I'm not from England/America
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#19
If you have the social problems associated with Non Verbal Learning disorders than that could put you at a disadvantage because if you wanted to be a professional you would need to be very confident and willing to promote yourself by meeting new people and such. Otherwise I don't see how this can stop you from being the best you want to be as a player.
12 fret fury
#20
Quote by xxdarrenxx


Some people connect faster, this is partly based on intelligence.



Hmm, my IQ isn't that low but since I'm not a good learner at school stuff...
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#21
Quote by 08L1V10N
Hmm, my IQ isn't that low but since I'm not a good learner at school stuff...


Really man, I wouldn't worry about it too much. We all are dealt different hands. Play your cards well, and enjoy the game.
shred is gaudy music
#22
Quote by edg
Personally, I'd not put a high degree of concern in that (or any at all). Science and medicine love classifying and pigeonholing things they don't particularly understand at any fundamental level. Whatever seems to fit the formulas, and whatever certain groups/individuals want "discovered", because that's what they fund, get "discovered". Like almost any organization of groups of people, it's highly political and essentially corrupt and based on fear -- if you propose something new, no matter how logical or worthy of some investigation, if it doesn't "conform" or upsets the pet theories of the established, your career can be over in a blink of an eye. Just look at modern "health care". It's FOR PROFIT. How could they possibly have YOUR best interests in mind?

Do you never go to the doctor? Or do you just ignore everything your Doctor says to you? I could write more about this but this is a music forum.

I agree about not worrying about it though. TS, everyone has things that might hinder their progress as a musician - somepeople have physical conditions, some people have mental conditions and some people are just tone deaf.

However, whatever hindraces you have, you will almost certainly go further in music if you don't fixate on them or even worry about them. If someone approaches an instrument with the attitude "I'm rubbish at music, I'll never get good at guitar" then they will almost certainly not get good at guitar.

Enjoy playing guitar, get as good as you can and then think about how this will affect you becoming a proffessional musician when you have to make that decision. Also, remember that kid on youtube who played with his feet cos he had no arms? If he can do it so can anyone.
#23
Soz for this, made my own topic on the matter instead of hijacking this one xD
Last edited by Gego at Apr 12, 2009,
#24
I just replied to somebody that was worried about progressing to an Advanced musician because he has AS syndrome. I'm going to tell you the same thing I told him....just play!

Don't think "Well, I don't know if it will affect my playing" or "Well, I guess I can't do this". Don't think like that. Simply try your best. If your giving it your best shot, than there is nothing more you can do. Just go for it. Dedication is all it takes!
#25
Quote by 08L1V10N
Hmm, my IQ isn't that low but since I'm not a good learner at school stuff...

Bad at school =/= not intelligent. all people learn differently.
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#26
Bad at school often means low willpower, not low intelligence. In my opinion anyways. My entire group of freinds are technically gifted (I hate the term to, but thats what thier numbers mean) save one, and they're all failures.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#27
I'm doing pre-university secondary education. Which involves inferential reasoning fairly much while that is my weak point. So in my case it hasn't anything to do with low willpower but that's an other discussion anyway...

Thank you all for the comments it was helpful
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.