#1
What chords, modes and scales work well in progressive rock?

I mean bands like Pink Floyd, Genesis etc.
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#2
Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. Major and Minor scales. No modes.
#3
Quote by michal23
Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. Major and Minor scales. No modes.

you are really stupid
#4
Quote by 420weedman
you are really stupid


Lol, why is he stupid?

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#6
i thought you meant me
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#8
Quote by michal23
Okay.

Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. Major and Minor scales. No modes.
#9
...

What is your point? If you could be so kind and point out the 'stupidity' within my post, I'd appreciate that.
#10
ok, first off im not getting involved in the stupid stuff.
im done with arguing on UG, im here to learn.
(and help people if i can)

but to the guy who said no modes, what do you mean?
dream theater isnt really progressive "rock" (idk, ive heard people call them progressive metal) but he uses modes all the time.
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#11
Quote by michal23
Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. Major and Minor scales. No modes.

Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. this part
Major and Minor scales. No modes. this part
#12
Theres no chord or scale thats going to make your music sound progressive, your composition skills are what you need to work on.

Just study the bands you're influenced by
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Feb 3, 2009,
#13
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
but to the guy who said no modes, what do you mean?
dream theater isnt really progressive "rock" (idk, ive heard people call them progressive metal) but he uses modes all the time.


Modern music is very rarely modal. Bands like Dream Theater will often have a single riff or phrase that may be considered modal, but whole songs are mostly modal. Bands like Pink Floyd rarely use modes even for riffs.

TS, to get a progressive rock sound, tempo, instrumentation, structure, tone, and phrasing are far more important when it comes to shaping your sound than chords and scales.
#14
Quote by michal23
Modern music is very rarely modal. Bands like Dream Theater will often have a single riff or phrase that may be considered modal, but whole songs are mostly modal. Bands like Pink Floyd rarely use modes even for riffs.

TS, to get a progressive rock sound, tempo, instrumentation, structure, tone, and phrasing are far more important when it comes to shaping your sound than chords and scales.

great idea heres how to play prog rock guitar pro just sound like prog rock guitar
you can thank me later
#15
Quote by 420weedman
great idea heres how to play prog rock guitar pro just sound like prog rock guitar
you can thank me later


Man, you're even bad at being a troll.
#16
Quote by michal23
Man, you're even bad at being a troll.

Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. Major and Minor scales. No modes.
#17
While modes are rare in common music, you shouldn't say "no modes".

Theres alot of more technical progressive rock bands than Pink Floyd
#18
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
While modes are rare in common music, you shouldn't say "no modes".

Theres alot of more technical progressive rock bands than Pink Floyd


Agreed, but the specific examples he gave were Pink Floyd and Genesis, which suggests that's the kind of sound he's after, and those two bands very rarely use modes. Off the top of my head, I can think of only one Pink Floyd song in which is partially modal, and even that is just a brief chord progression.
#19
Obvious troll is obvious. Don't feed him, just wait for the mods to come around.


As for playing prog rock, whilst I'm no expert in this genre, I do know that many times the best way to find out how to sound like someone is to study their music. A LOT. Learn lots of songs, transcribe their solos, analyse them, watch concert DVDs, listen to the music, try to catch onto anything they're doing.


G'luck.
#20
Quote by Confusius
Obvious troll is obvious. Don't feed him, just wait for the mods to come around.


As for playing prog rock, whilst I'm no expert in this genre, I do know that many times the best way to find out how to sound like someone is to study their music. A LOT. Learn lots of songs, transcribe their solos, analyse them, watch concert DVDs, listen to the music, try to catch onto anything they're doing.


G'luck.

not even trolling that guy is really stupid
#22
Quote by 420weedman
Major and Minor chords with extensions, as well as power chords. this part
Major and Minor scales. No modes. this part


You've been warned once, and if you continue to be this dense you'll get another warning. Calling someone an idiot and just repeating their post a bunch of times is totally unhelpful.


TS, your best bet is to study some songs by artists you like and see how they use their chords and scales. You'll see that a fair bit of what these bands do involves fairly standard chords and scales, and often it's the relationships that make them sound interesting.

Now, michal, even if a whole song isn't modal, modes can certainly be used within the songs, and the distinct qualities of different modal sounds should not be ignored just because a song is generally in this or that key.


TS, this general sort of discussion is probably not that helpful to you, so why don't you list a few songs by prog bands that you like, and perhaps we can go a little more in-depth on them?


edit: nevermind, I can't take it. He's just too annoying.
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#23
Quote by psychodelia
You've been warned once, and if you continue to be this dense you'll get another warning. Calling someone an idiot and just repeating their post a bunch of times is totally unhelpful.


TS, your best bet is to study some songs by artists you like and see how they use their chords and scales. You'll see that a fair bit of what these bands do involves fairly standard chords and scales, and often it's the relationships that make them sound interesting.

Now, michal, even if a whole song isn't modal, modes can certainly be used within the songs, and the distinct qualities of different modal sounds should not be ignored just because a song is generally in this or that key.


TS, this general sort of discussion is probably not that helpful to you, so why don't you list a few songs by prog bands that you like, and perhaps we can go a little more in-depth on them?
shut the **** up ******
#25
Quote by psychodelia
Now, michal, even if a whole song isn't modal, modes can certainly be used within the songs, and the distinct qualities of different modal sounds should not be ignored just because a song is generally in this or that key.


I agree, modes can be and are used by many progressive rock bands. However these are bands that are unlike the ones mentioned by the TS, and the modes themselves are, as I stated, often very brief.

In any case, you can pretty much use any mode you like, TS. It is important, however, to remember that whole songs are very rarely modal, and that modes are usually used for small riffs and phrases. Also, like I said, there are factors other than chords and scales used that are far more important to shaping the sound you want.