#1
How can i choose what type of scale to play if chords are givem to me in a sheet?

Example: gm7 em7 am am7 - repeat

So i know the key is a G

But what scale would be the best to choose?

Example: major, penatonic , blues
#2
depends on what you want to express
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#3
Quote by Zoso Juan
depends on what you want to express

+1, you don't "play a scale" if you're soloing. You use the notes in that key to play along with the chords, but you can also change "scales"

depends on what your playing really.
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#4
if you have guitar-pro it shows you what scales go along with the notes you are playing
Whaaaat!!!!!!
#6
so you choose a song to listen to in guitar pro and it opens. Now, after that you simply go to the top menu and click tools. A list pops open and in that list there is scales... and you click on it. Once you've clicked on it, a screen will appear and at the bottom of it, it says scale finder. Once you've clicked that, another window will pop under it and it at the top of that window, there is scan from bar _ to _ and you simply choose which bars you want the scales for and it gives you which would go in which key.
Whaaaat!!!!!!
#7
you can use any scale that has the notes of the key of Gmin in it. Gmin is the same as Bb maj, so any scale that has the notes of BbM in it could technically work

basically, if it sounds good, go for it


SIMPLE ANSWER: play a pentatonic shape with your first finger on G, and your set
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#8
Quote by cob666
so you choose a song to listen to in guitar pro and it opens. Now, after that you simply go to the top menu and click tools. A list pops open and in that list there is scales... and you click on it. Once you've clicked on it, a screen will appear and at the bottom of it, it says scale finder. Once you've clicked that, another window will pop under it and it at the top of that window, there is scan from bar _ to _ and you simply choose which bars you want the scales for and it gives you which would go in which key.


Sweet! Thanks for that!!

Any other tips for someone who uses GP to write down his riffs/songs? That should help me SO much
#10
ill send you over to MT, as thats where the theory guys hang out.

though honestly, what scale you play is really going to be dependent on what you want to play. i mean over Gm7 you could play G aeolian, G dorian, or G phrygian, and those are just from the normal modes. and i cant think of any single scale you could play over all those chords and not have to worry about dissonant notes. not that with that kind of thing you would want to play in a single scale anyway.
#11
If your song is in G, you play G major or G major pentatonic. Simple.

Find the key of whatever song your songs in and use those notes.
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#12
Quote by jof1029
ill send you over to MT, as thats where the theory guys hang out.

though honestly, what scale you play is really going to be dependent on what you want to play. i mean over Gm7 you could play G aeolian, G dorian, or G phrygian, and those are just from the normal modes. and i cant think of any single scale you could play over all those chords and not have to worry about dissonant notes. not that with that kind of thing you would want to play in a single scale anyway.

yea im trying out that progression and im thinking you might want to use more chord tones and switching modes to play with that. it doesnt seem like one scale only would suit it.
#13
simply put, if you have a series of chords and want to know what individual notes will sound good over them, deconstruct the chords and you have your answer. knowing the modes will never hamper your efforts, but knowing the construction of chords on the fretboard is the most important thing to good soloing in my opinion.
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#14
Why bother with suggestions that will end up in a boring run of the mill solo
#15
Quote by 1337void
Why bother with suggestions that will end up in a boring run of the mill solo
Because phrasing
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[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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        L.
#16
Quote by 1337void
Why bother with suggestions that will end up in a boring run of the mill solo

There are no boring scales, just boring players.
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#17
Quote by steven seagull
There are no boring scales, just boring players.



Oh SNAP!!!

You have been shat on by the seagull!!!

Edit: TS - one diatonic scale won't cut it for the whole progression, because you have both an "A" (in the Am and Am7 chords) and an "A#"(in the Gm7 chord)

So you could play the G pentatonic over most of the progression, with the exception of the Gm7 - then you'd have to switch to the Gm Pentatonic (or just leave out the "A" all together.
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Last edited by Guitartist at Feb 5, 2009,