#1
Hi all,

This is my first foray into GB&C.

I was thinking about changing the capacitor on my tone pot so that when I roll it down it scoops the mids instead of cutting the highs.

Is that possible and if so what is the capacitor I would need and what is the appropriate frequency rating I should be looking for?

Has anyone else tried this before? What was your experience with it? I'm playing an Ibanez RG with passive electronics.

I tried the search bar, but it didn't help that I didn't know the key words that would bring up similar topics. All the searches I got dídn't relate to this topic.

Thanks in advance.
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Last edited by ragingkitty at Feb 3, 2009,
#2
First off, I believe it's a capacitor not a transistor you are talking about, and second off, I've never heard of a single cap swap that will allow you to scoop your mids, but then again I haven't heard of a lot of things...


There is a user on here named Invader Jim, he knows his electronics. Also, a user named forsaknazrael on here is also extremely talented in the electronics department, send a message to either or both of those guys for some solid answers! Click on their names underlined above to be taken to their profile pages, and click on "send a message" to get in touch with them.
#3
Quote by lumberjack
First off, I believe it's a capacitor not a transistor you are talking about, and second off, I've never heard of a single cap swap that will allow you to scoop your mids, but then again I haven't heard of a lot of things...


There is a user on here named Invader Jim, he knows his electronics. Also, a user named forsaknazrael on here is also extremely talented in the electronics department, send a message to either or both of those guys for some solid answers! Click on their names underlined above to be taken to their profile pages, and click on "send a message" to get in touch with them.


Thanks for the help lumberjack. I wasn't too sure if that was even possible at all, but from what I read about the electronics in guitars, particularly the tone pot. I figured that would be very possible, as the tone pot is just a volume pot with instructions to cut a particular frequency range. From quite a few articles I read, it seemed to suggest that so long as I specify a particular range of frequencies for the the tone pot to affect, in theory I could use it to scoop my guitar tone.
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
Last edited by ragingkitty at Feb 3, 2009,
#4
Sounds like a good idea! I would go ahead and shoot those two an email. There are lots of guys on here who know tons about electronics theory and circuit building on here, hopefully they'll chime in shortly...


::sits there waiting because he wants to know if this is possible as well::
#5
you're going to need an active circuit in order to scoop a specific frequency. Caps filter out certain frequencies, but they start from the top. So, you'll cut more than just mids with the right cap. I would suggest looking into active preamps or getting an EQ pedal.
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#6
They have passive band pass filters, no?

I don't know the specific values... but you'd need:

R: resistor C:capacitor


pot in            pot out
-                      -
--R--|---C--|-----
     |      |
     C      R
     |      |
-----|------|-----    ground
Last edited by HibyPrime at Feb 4, 2009,
#7
Quote by HibyPrime
They have passive band pass filters, no?

I don't know the specific values... but you'd need:

R: resistor C:capacitor


pot in pot out
- -
--R--|---C--|-----
| |
C R
| |
-----|------|----- ground

ooohhh. I didn't think of that.
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#8
Right...

So from what I understand, is that once I put in a resistor to filter out the frequencies, anything above that frequency is also filtered out?

I'm not an electronics major, neither do I have any experience.

I'm assume that there's nothing I can use to act as a bypass for a particular range of frequencies then?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#9
I don't recommend scooping your mids, personally.
1 - Mids are what help you cut through the mix in a live situation.
2 - There is an EQ on the amp you can use to scoop mids.
3 - You can get a EQ pedal to scoop mids.


That said, here is a passive circuit that will cut your mids:

Here's a really cool mod for those of you that don't use your tone control ( you always leave it full up right?). It's a mid cut control designed by Torres Engineering that replaces your tone control, actually it doesn't replace anything, it just rewires your tone control and adds a few parts. When you turn down the mid control is scoops out the mids yet leaves the lows and highs. You can experiment with the capacitor values to change the eq point that the mid cut effects. Just follow the diagram below, make sure the lead coming from the inductor to the outside lug of the tone pot is insulated (the other lead doesn't matter cause it's soldered to the back of the pot along with the tabs on the inductor-just make sure you have room for it on the side of the pot or solder it to the back of the pot).

http://www.jpbourgeois.org/guitar/micos1.htm
BTW, anything on that page that says it boosts mids does not...it will actually cut treble and bass, accentuating the mids.
Last edited by forsaknazrael at Feb 5, 2009,
#10
Quote by HibyPrime
They have passive band pass filters, no?

I don't know the specific values... but you'd need:

R: resistor C:capacitor


pot in pot out
- -
--R--|---C--|-----
| |
C R
| |
-----|------|----- ground



Epic.

I like it. This is also correct. If you wanted to have some real fun you could have a 3 band style EQ within the guitar.... but this is pointless. Also I agree that a pedal would do you more justice. Once it's gone (via the guitar) I think the tone suffers if you try to boost the mids in say a live situation?
#11
ok see i have asked this same exact question the other day. No one could answer that question. the circuits Im seeing here are basically nothing new. the cap and resistor are treble bleed circuits. the one from torres is new to me but thats not what I want. I know the caps fender uses and gibson but they seem to extract too much treble from the sound. I want to know what size cap to use that wont bleed so much treble to ground from the circuit when using the tone knobs. (Things get too muddy for my taste.) I have a .47 and .22 cap on my knobs now that can be used with all combinations of pickups which is currently 12.
#12
^^^.47 and .22 are way to big. Usually a .047 or .022 are used if you want less treble bleed then you need to go smaller.
#13
Tackleberry- Thats what they are. I just figured for simplicities sake Id leave the zero's out. So what should I try? Whats higher and whats lower than .047 or .022? Should I have .0047 or .0022? Or is there some other denomination I should try?
#15
Thanks forsaknazrael. I wil be looking within the next couple of weeks. I'll let you know how it turns out.