#1
Note: Not phrasing but phasing, without the "r"

What I mean by phasing is phasing from a verse to a chorus. When composing, I really have a prob with that. My options usually are : base a whole song on one chord progression, or nothing. I can't change from something to something else. Let's say intro to verse, I just can't find anything.

Help please =/
#3
Quote by toshiro umezewa
i think the word you are looking for is transition.
you are having trouble transitioning from the verse to the chorus.
however, i can't think of any advice atm, sorry.


Yeah transition, my bad x.x
#4
Quote by kevC4
Note: Not phrasing but phasing, without the "r"

What I mean by phasing is phasing from a verse to a chorus. When composing, I really have a prob with that. My options usually are : base a whole song on one chord progression, or nothing. I can't change from something to something else. Let's say intro to verse, I just can't find anything.

Help please =/



Listen to, learn, and study other songs that you like. You should get plenty of ideas there.
#5
Okay so transitioning from a verse to a chorus. What I do is try to get a good verse going rhythmically, then if the song calls for it, build up or come down to the chorus with the pre-chorus. The pre-chorus doesn't have to be anything fancy, maybe even just 3 notes that tie in the verse to the chorus.

Try contrasting the chorus from the overall feel of the song. If the song is really fast, try a slower more melodic chorus. Visa versa, if the song (main riff) is melodic/clean/slow go for a faster chorus. That is of course if you like the idea of the song not sounding the same throughout.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#6
^ I actually like those 2 posts above. Helps a lot. And obviously yeah, I should study songs.

Thanks guys :P
#7
Quote by kevC4
^ I actually like those 2 posts above. Helps a lot. And obviously yeah, I should study songs.

Thanks guys :P

Not a problem. If you're still looking at this, when you're writing a segment in a new song, try to think of the piece not as your own. Think if you were hearing it on the radio or internet and you thought to yourself, you'd really like to hear "_____" after this part. Ya know?
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#8
Yes study songs. You don't have to do all the legwork either. There are plenty of articles, books, and discussions around that analyse songs and song structure.

I read one article that was really interesting a while back. It discussed static and dynamic harmony.

Static harmony was a harmonic technique that revolved mostly around the I chord. Sometimes it would be an oscillating vamp between the tonic and one other chord. Usually the iii, the V, or the vi. Sometimes it would be a different chord but the main thing is that it doesn't really feel like there is much movement.

Then after some static harmony would be a form of dynamic harmony. The chord progression shows movement and it feels like it picks up pace. There will be a tonic and some other chords and it will usually end on a dominant to tonic cadence.

The theory was pretty full on in parts and it was applied to classical music. But afterward I went around and started seeing the same kind of ideas in a lot of the music I listen to. It was really crazy.

One example I came across recently due to a thread here was Paint it Black.

It starts with an Em B Em B static harmony. The B just leads us back to the tonic Em and reinforces it's tonic sound. The song doesn't feel it goes anywhere during this part.

Then it goes into the Em D G D Em D G D A B which provides a lot more movement. This is the dynamic part of the harmony. It really gives the song push and you can clearly hear the change of pace as the changes come faster and new destinations are pursued before returning to the B to set up that V-I cadence back into the static harmony.

Although the author claimed this method could explain all music I wasn't about to take his word for it. I read lot's of other kinds of analysis and analyzed songs myself. I learned about chord substitutions and root movement (progressions, regressions, and successions). And the importance of contrast in it's many different forms.

Think about what you're doing. Sometimes if you've got a complicated chord progression in the verses the best thing to do is simplify for the chorus with something cliche and easy for the listener to follow. Think of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds as an example. The verses really are kind of complicated from a harmonic point of view and challenge the ear to find a place to settle. - Then the verse is a simple three chord trick I IV V in G with a simple and catchy melody and just the title of the song repeated. It really is an excellent example of contrasting the complex with extremely simple.

Anyway learn some basic tricks and cliches and find new ways to make them interesting. Then when you are writing something completely original and get stuck you can always reach into your bag to see if anything will work. It won't always fit and some stuff will sit around for months before you find the right destination for it. Maybe find a collaborator.

Whatever you do just keep at it man and you'll be alright.
Si