#1
So every live concert i have gone to with an exception of a few always has really crappy front of house mix? why can't the trained professionals that are sound guys not hear this?
#2
a lot of sound guys aren't well trained, a lot of times there's also a major rush to get a mix, and also how you perceive the mix depends on where you are in the venue as well.
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#3
depending on where you're standing it will sound different, usually the sound board is where it will sound best, so if it sounds bad, walk to where the board is and then it may sound better
#4
because the really good ones get better jobs
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#5
You saying you can manage the audio level mixing in a stadium better then the people they have for it?

Also, every single square foot of space at a concert will sound different.
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Last edited by SlinkyBlue at Feb 4, 2009,
#6
You only have the one shot to get it, unlike studio. That's the first problem. The second is how hard it is to get a good mix, especially equalization and effects. Try it sometime, and see how good your mix is. Put the two together and it's not so fun. Throw in other things needing to be done, and it can go to hell in a second or less, literally.

And unfortunately most people don't have a clue about Audio Engineering, and often get their jobs based off their contacts over skill. Or they talk themselves up when they know next to nothing.

Remember that the engineers are set dead center, and that they mix via headphones of the desk, which means that what you hear isn't what they hear.
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Last edited by Taydr at Feb 4, 2009,
#9
Quote by teegman
Maybe you just suck at listening? The mix is perfect you're just too untrained to properly appreciate it.

The chance of the mix being perfect is virtually nil. Most live mixes are complete shit, due to the majority of 'trained engineers' not having a clue.
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#10
Quote by Taydr

Remember that the engineers are set dead center, and that they mix via headphones of the desk, which means that what you hear isn't what they hear.

That. It probably sounds great to them.

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#11
I have never heard a good mix at a bar/local band setting but Rush, Iron Maiden, Bon Jovi, and Judas Priest had great mixes when I heard them. Gamma Ray also was great even though it was a small venue in Seattle. Obviously the professional bands are more likely to have a decent sounding mix though this isn't always the case.
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#12
Quote by Kingofold
I have never heard a good mix at a bar/local band setting but Rush, Iron Maiden, Bon Jovi, and Judas Priest had great mixes when I heard them. Gamma Ray also was great even though it was a small venue in Seattle. Obviously the professional bands are more likely to have a decent sounding mix though this isn't always the case.

TSO had a great team of sound techs when I saw them, as did Blue Man. Your local Joe may vary. Good point, that.

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#13
Most live mixes are complete shit, due to the majority of 'trained engineers' not having a clue.

So as an untrained listener you know better?
I think the more likely scenario is that you don't know how to appreciate a good mix even if it's slapping you in the face. Go listen to some overly processed pop-rock dreamtheater piss and stop complaining about how professionals go about their jobs.
#14
Quote by SteveHouse
That. It probably sounds great to them.

It depends on the soundie really. I've heard some incredibly shit mixes through cans off the desk, but I've heard some amazing ones as well.

Also when soundcheck is done, the venue is pretty empty. Bodies change the sound quality, and absorb a hell of a lot of it.

Quote by Kingofold
I have never heard a good mix at a bar/local band setting but Rush, Iron Maiden, Bon Jovi, and Judas Priest had great mixes when I heard them. Gamma Ray also was great even though it was a small venue in Seattle. Obviously the professional bands are more likely to have a decent sounding mix though this isn't always the case.

The professionals have professionally trained crew, and they stay the same for at least the whole tour, if not a large chunk of the bands touring career. They not only know what their doing, but also have a very good idea of what works for the band. Not to mention insanely better gear. Their desks alone cost upwards of 100k. I wouldn't be surprised if the bigger acts have over half a mil of sound gear alone, and over a mil in total.

Quote by teegman
So as an untrained listener you know better?
I think the more likely scenario is that you don't know how to appreciate a good mix even if it's slapping you in the face. Go listen to some overly processed pop-rock dreamtheater piss and stop complaining about how professionals go about their jobs.

Just for your information, I happen to be a trained, and almost fully qualified sound engineer. I happen to train up soundies and lampies. Not only do I know how to appreciate a good mix, I fucking well know how to create one.

I can guarantee that I have a lot more professional experience than many of these so called 'professional' engineers, most of who don't have any clue as to how the system works, let alone how to fucking use it.
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Last edited by Taydr at Feb 4, 2009,