#1
I don't know how to write tab so i'm just going to explain this chord.
So if you play an open Emajor chord and the move the G# up two frets so it's on the A# on the third fret you get this really cool sounding chord that i would be very greatful if someone could tell me what it's called.

I tried both chordbook and chordfind but nothing came up.
Thanks
#2
I'd call that E major 5 add flat 5th.... or maybe an inversion of some kind of B 7th suspended chord.... something like B/E major 7th suspended 4th.

I'm sure somebody else will know much better than I do, though. So for a perfect answer, give it a few more minutes
#3
Depending on context it may sound major or minor, so label it with a (M) or (m) respectively, this is cuz there is no 3rd. The brackets suggest the tonality of the chord.

E(M)add#11
E(m)add#11

Chord formula: R #4 5 = E A# B
#4
Well, E Major is E G# B. You have E A# B, so that would be E Major b5. Personally, I'd add the D on the B string as well, making an E Major 7 b5 chord.

edit: LOL, you have three completely different answers. This is because it is an abstract chord without context. I stand by my answer though.
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Last edited by M.B.MetalTabber at Feb 4, 2009,
#6
If you rearrange the notes to B A# E, you could see it as R M7 4, which would be a Bmaj7sus4.

The TS's voicing would just be an inversion of that.
#7
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
edit: LOL, you have three completely different answers. This is because it is an abstract chord without context. I stand by my answer though.

Not really.

I said Emaj5addb5 or Bmaj7sus4/E.

What mdc said in both of his/her posts is essentially the same thing that I said. He used #11 instead of b5 in his first post and then talked about the inversion that I mentioned in his second post.

And your answer would've been in line with these except you added a D.
#8
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Well, E Major is E G# B. You have E A# B, so that would be E Major b5. Personally, I'd add the D on the B string as well, making an E Major 7 b5 chord.

It can't be labelled E "Major"....., there is no 3rd.
Adding the D would make it an E7 of some kind, not E Major 7.
#9
Quote by mdc
It can't be labelled E "Major"....., there is no 3rd.
Adding the D would make it an E7 of some kind, not E Major 7.

Sorry, working on assignments while typing this lol. Still, it depends what's in the bass, or what the second guitar is doing, to decide properly what chord it is.
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#10
That and the fact the we (except mdc) forgot to mention that the third is omitted and thus the chord's tonality depends on context.

mdc... does putting the M or m in parenthesis like that indicate the the third is omitted and the tonality is implied? Sorry, I'm self half-ass taught
#11
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Sorry, working on assignments while typing this lol.

Ah yes, the joys of multi-tasking! I'm working on a college assignment right now too lol! Structural Mechanics mate.
#12
wow this chord is as mysterious as it sounds
i think i'm just going to call this an E 5 add flat 5th chord för simplicity unless any you think that's completley wrong.

and also thanks for all the quick replies
#13
Oh also, pank, the tab for this chord would look like this:


e--0-
b--0-
g--3-
d--2-
a--2-
e--0-


See the number represents which fret you play on each string. The 0 means that you play that string open. If you didn't want to play that string at all you wouldn't put a number at all for that string.
#14
Quote by pank
wow this chord is as mysterious as it sounds
i think i'm just going to call this an E 5 add flat 5th chord för simplicity unless any you think that's completley wrong.

and also thanks for all the quick replies

Well, you haven't got the 5th needed to make it an E5, so that's why we're all heading towards Eb5, or variations, or even inversions of other chords.
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thanks for the compliment man!
#15
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Well, you haven't got the 5th needed to make it an E5, so that's why we're all heading towards Eb5, or variations, or even inversions of other chords.

He's got the B! Raaa, damn assignments!
#16
Quote by jimtaka
Oh also, pank, the tab for this chord would look like this:


e--0-
b--0-
g--3-
d--2-
a--2-
e--0-


See the number represents which fret you play on each string. The 0 means that you play that string open. If you didn't want to play that string at all you wouldn't put a number at all for that string.


Okay, thanks!

Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Well, you haven't got the 5th needed to make it an E5, so that's why we're all heading towards Eb5, or variations, or even inversions of other chords.


But the fifth of E would be B, right ? and i have a B on the second fret of the fifth string.
#17
^--- Correct. We're all a little slow in the morning

Whoops, just realized that you are both in the UK so I suppose it's not morning over there. No excuses for you two!
#18
Quote by pank
Okay, thanks!


But the fifth of E would be B, right ? and i have a B on the second fret of the fifth string.

You can also play it here.

-7
-11
-9
-x
-x
-0


See how may voicings you can find.
#19
Quote by jimtaka
mdc... does putting the M or m in parenthesis like that indicate the the third is omitted and the tonality is implied? Sorry, I'm self half-ass taught

??
#20
I'm self half-ass taught aswell lol!

Quote by jimtaka
does putting the M or m in parenthesis like that indicate the the third is omitted and the tonality is implied?

Yes.

Now that's the word I was looking for, "parenthesis!"
Last edited by mdc at Feb 4, 2009,
#22
Quote by mdc
You can also play it here.

-7
-11
-9
-x
-x
-0


See how may voicings you can find.


cool, i guess this would work as well.

-7
-11
-9
-8
-7
-0

pretty hard but it works
#23
Yep. That might be an easier fingering if you omit the E on the A string, that'll give you a 5 string voicing for that chord. I've no guitar to hand right now so can't really do much.

Don't forget that you don't always have to start with the root (E). Try inverting the chord aswell.
#25
Esus#4 - that's what I'd call it.

It does sound rather cool doesn't it.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 4, 2009,
#26
I would call it an augmented 4th rather then diminished fifth as it already has a fifth. The chord sounds cool, I learned it from an opeth song.
#27
Quote by jimtaka
Oh also, pank, the tab for this chord would look like this:


e--0-
b--0-
g--3-
d--2-
a--2-
e--0-


See the number represents which fret you play on each string. The 0 means that you play that string open. If you didn't want to play that string at all you wouldn't put a number at all for that string.

Messin' around with this, and if you play this voicing and then add the A# with your little finger on and off, in a certain "Flying in a Blue Dream" rhythm......
#28
Wow, I don't remember any of these posts :S I wonder what assignment I thought I was working on...Sorry for any stupid posts I made! Looks like you have some good answers now though from mdc
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#29
Think TAZ from Zakk Wylde... opening chord... thought i'd throw that in there without naming it. Andreas Kisser used it in a Sepultura song too, though the name is lost on me. Perhaps an altered chord, hence it has the sharp and flat 5 together. And usually, the altered is on the mixolydian or 5th degree. Hell if I know, I just love playing around with it. You could make it a Lydian chord too (Key of B) in which case it would be an E5 add#11. Does it help at all?

**Doh... only saw skilly's answer now... my bad.**
Last edited by evolucian at Feb 5, 2009,
#30
Quote by evolucian
E5 add#11.

Esus#4

I saw mention of Mixolydian?? Maybe if you playing F# Mixolydian it could be a bVIIsus#4 chord (or bVII5add#11 or whatever you call it).

On it's own though the chord is more suggestive of E Lydian with it's #4.

If you have an E major and then throw in an Esus#4 by replacing the third (G#) with a #4 (A#) as the original post seems to describe then any modal analysis would centre around Lydian.

Just playing the cord in open E position it reminds me of a Stone Temple Pilots song. I can't remember the name for sure but it might be "pretty penny" or something Anyway I'm going to have to dig out the CD and listen to it. I'm sure I have the lyrics wrong and it's probably the wrong song. I'm sure that chord is used in one of their songs though. It's going to bug me till I figure it out.

EDIT: not pretty penny. I'll find it soon though I'm working my way through. I think it might be off the Core album.

EDIT2: The song I was thinking of is Sin from the Core album. (Don't ask how I got that song confused with pretty penny cause I don't know).
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 5, 2009,
#31
True 20, but why i mentioned mixolydian or the 5th degree is because thats the degree where most "altered" chords exist where they can add the #5 and b5 and #9/b9 together... I know it has a lydian sound cos i ended with it... but it could also be a 5. Not arguing, just saying what it could be though lydian is safer. Sus#4 did evade me though, nice one!
#32
Oh I see - I get you now. I got confused there 'cause Mixolydian is usually restricted to describe a mode and not normally used as the name for a scale degree. Maybe you were looking for the word dominant which is the name for the fifth degree? But yeah I get you with the altered chords on the 5 and 9.

I just figured that because there is already a perfect 5th in the chord that 5th function is filled so it would make more sense to think of it as a #4 as opposed to an altered 5th.

But that's just what makes the most sense to me. So long as the name will result in playing the correct notes it doesn't really matter what we call it.

I've been playing with this chord all day though it's pretty cool. Resolves well to the E major. It also works with something like Esus#4 Gm7 F of just straight to the F. Or with Esus#4 C7 F.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 6, 2009,
#33
TS started with "I took E Major and moved the note up", which slightly implies E5add+11 or A+11 (no 3rd).

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#34
Quote by xxdarrenxx
TS started with "I took E Major and moved the note up", which slightly implies E5add+11 or A+11 (no 3rd).

A+11? How should you read that? And there is no A it's only an A# in the original chord.
the notes are E A# B or 1 #4 5 (1 5 #11). So I can see E5add#11, I prefer Esus#4, and a few other names that have been thrown around would work too but I don't get the A+11??

Isn't A+11 some kind of augmented A chord maybe with a dom 11 extension A C# E# G B (1 3 #5 b7 11)? How do you get that name?
Si
#35
Quote by 20Tigers
A+11? How should you read that? And there is no A it's only an A# in the original chord.
the notes are E A# B or 1 #4 5 (1 5 #11). So I can see E5add#11, I prefer Esus#4, and a few other names that have been thrown around would work too but I don't get the A+11??

Isn't A+11 some kind of augmented A chord maybe with a dom 11 extension A C# E# G B (1 3 #5 b7 11)? How do you get that name?


Oh ****e

Eadd#11 (no 3rd)

yes lol I had a busy day today, my apologies.

It's because in Dutch the letter E = pronounced "ey", but in english "ey" is the pronunciation of "A".

So saying 'E chord' in real life means an E chord in dutch, but if it was in an english context I'd be saying A Chord"

Pronunciation is exactly the same.

It's confusing when I teach my students in Dutch and use the same theory but different language here, it confuses my shizzle

I often mix up dutch grammar with english words and vice versa also.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 6, 2009,
#36
This chord also works well as a sub for the IV in a IV - I plagal movement to get IVsus#4 - I. This strengthens the resolve of the plagal movement because the #4 in the IV chord is the leading tone in the I chord.


In context the Esus#4 would resolve to B.
Si