#1
I can't seem to write any good lyrics anymore or make any good riffs/licks. I have plenty of inspiration, but nothing comes. and my solos all sound alike. I'm not very good at soloing, and I don't know how to improve. I've been looking at theory, but I don't really understand it. and I don't know where to start! and getting lessons would be expensive. what do I do?
My gear:
1969 Gibson SG
Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier Full Stack
Dunlop Cry Baby
Digitech TL-2 Hardwire Metal Distortion
Digitech Digital Delay
#2
Start listening to different types of music to inspire you in some way. This should help you get out of the rut of not being able to play anything different to what you are used to. Then click on columns link at the top of this page and in the search box type 'the crusades'...
#3
This happened to me so i listened to different things i listened to the blue for it.. But it can be different
#4
Learn theory, it will help you udnerstand why 1 thing sounds most of the time better then something else, and could help with getting ur music out of ur head.

Music theory is like a language.

And well you know, if you can't speak English, even if you have good ideas, you are unable to say em.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#5
I read somewhere that most music teachers tell you to learn where every note on the fretboard is. does this really help? I've learned where all of the A's are today. and I will definately start listening to different music. I guess I'll download some country, blues, and electronica.
My gear:
1969 Gibson SG
Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier Full Stack
Dunlop Cry Baby
Digitech TL-2 Hardwire Metal Distortion
Digitech Digital Delay
#6
It is a good idea to know where the notes are on the fretboard. Basically it will help when you learn scales and learn the way notes work together i.e intervals.
#7
I've noticed that when I play, I know where I am by the number fret, and I think to myself something like, 9, 7, 10, 5, and so on when I play. would it be better to know these by notes instead? so that I would be saying something like C#, B, D, A, and so on in my mind? I was thinking that by doing this, I could also learn what notes are in each scale and mode, and then I would know what notes I can use to solo, and learn where they are on the fretboard. do you think that would work, or does it make no sense, cause I'm kinda lost. lol
My gear:
1969 Gibson SG
Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier Full Stack
Dunlop Cry Baby
Digitech TL-2 Hardwire Metal Distortion
Digitech Digital Delay
#8
your inspiration well has run dry, the only thing left to do is become a pop country musician

seriously though you might just want to take some time off and do other things that you enjoy. that always helps me when i feel like im in a funk.

and yes it definitely helps to know where your notes are on the fretboard. it helps even more to start thinking in notes instead of frets just in general. don't think 0221 = a minor, think A-C-E = a minor.
#10
I've noticed that when I play, I know where I am by the number fret, and I think to myself something like, 9, 7, 10, 5, and so on when I play. would it be better to know these by notes instead? so that I would be saying something like C#, B, D, A, and so on in my mind? I was thinking that by doing this, I could also learn what notes are in each scale and mode, and then I would know what notes I can use to solo, and learn where they are on the fretboard. do you think that would work, or does it make no sense, cause I'm kinda lost. lol


yes it will help in unspeakable ways in the long run to look at notes instead of exclusively the fret dots. (Although there are some things which no matter how well you know the fretboard are just easier to use patterns for, such as the 5 simple pentatonic box shapes, and symmetrical scales like whole tone and sym/aux diminished. But I digress)

it's important that you learn the notes IN THE KEY OF C, that is ABCDEFG (don't try and memorize C#, Ab, F#, etc). I remember when I first tried to memorize the fretboard I thought i was supposed to just look at it and just know where every single note was, and I quickly got frustrated. There is a reason pianos aren't just all white keys; they are laid out so that you can grasp the pattern that the notes make and understand their locations in a much easier and intuitive way. Guitar is no different, except since it all looks the same, you have to create this white and black key dynamic mentally by understanding the pattern that the notes in the key of C make. Once you have this down cold, you'll be surprised at how easy it is to add sharps and flats, and eventually you actually will be able to look at any fret and say what note it is, be it sharp, flat, or natural. So go start praticing visualizing the fretboard in the key of C-> CDEFGABC or A minor (C's relative minor) ->ABCDEFGA.
Give it a month or two and you'll find yourself with alot more improvisational freedom.