#1
I can't seem to get rid of this. I adjusted the truss rod straight it is well within spec. The string to metal fret buzz is on the 6 th string predominantly and a bit on the 5th. I can wail the **** out of the 1-4th strings with no buzz at all.

I am between jobs and cannot afford to take the guitar to get a professional setup for $45 at guitar center or what not. I am afraid to tighten the truss rod any more as it is getting pretty tight and I tried raising the floyd rose pegs on the bridge, I got it to where the action felt very high to me (take that for what its worth I only had one other guitar) and it still buzzed.

This is a Ibanez GRX20L I just picked up used for $60. Its in great shape. I did notice the tuning machines on this guitar seem to pretty crappy.

Is thing just a POS or can i get this fixed? Any professionals on here?

Before this I had a right washburn lyon series strat that I restrung upside down, is that washburn just alot better than this Ibanez or is it all in setup?
#2
You shouldn't turn the truss rod unless you know exactly where the problem stems from. Even then, there are proper procedures you need to follow to make sure you're not messing up your neck(depending on which way you're adjusting the bow).

There are 3 potential areas where buzzing problems may arise...
1. frets
2. neck bow
3. saddle/nut height

Before anything is adjusted, you need to know which one the problem is coming from.

1. Frets
Look down the neck from the saddle. Do all the frets look lined up?
Another way to check is to use something straight edged, like a metal ruler. Just place the ruler on top of the frets at an equal distance from the edge of the fretboard. You should be able to see if all the frets are at the right height, or if one is popping out.

2. Neck Bow
To check the neck bow, place a capo on the 1st fret. Press down at about the 13th fret with one hand. Now use your other hand to press on the 6th fret. There should be just enough space so that it doesn't touch the frets.

3. Saddle/Nut Height
You can play around with this one once you've looked at the other two. If you adjust the saddle height, however, you may need to adjust the neck bow again.

I'm just running through these really simply, so don't rely on this as a complete guide on how to do it.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
My money's on either the frets, or more likely, the saddle. My uncle lent me an acoustic once that had a buzzing 1st string, so I just shoved a little scrap of paper between the string and the saddle. It worked.
"Old. Man. Dead. Hand."

-Robb Flynn
#4
Quote by captivate
You shouldn't turn the truss rod unless you know exactly where the problem stems from. Even then, there are proper procedures you need to follow to make sure you're not messing up your neck(depending on which way you're adjusting the bow).

There are 3 potential areas where buzzing problems may arise...
1. frets
2. neck bow
3. saddle/nut height

Before anything is adjusted, you need to know which one the problem is coming from.

1. Frets
Look down the neck from the saddle. Do all the frets look lined up?
Another way to check is to use something straight edged, like a metal ruler. Just place the ruler on top of the frets at an equal distance from the edge of the fretboard. You should be able to see if all the frets are at the right height, or if one is popping out.

They are all appeared to be set in the neck at the same height

2. Neck Bow
To check the neck bow, place a capo on the 1st fret. Press down at about the 13th fret with one hand. Now use your other hand to press on the 6th fret. There should be just enough space so that it doesn't touch the frets.

This is correct and the I also did the 1st string 12th string playing card test to get the correct adjustment on the truss rod. When i got the guitar there was an obvious concave bow from about the 5th fret to the nut. I straightened that out by tightening the truss rod.

3. Saddle/Nut Height
You can play around with this one once you've looked at the other two. If you adjust the saddle height, however, you may need to adjust the neck bow again.

As I mentioned in my post, I tried this after the 2 prior and the action got very high and I still got a buzz.

I'm just running through these really simply, so don't rely on this as a complete guide on how to do it.



I really appreciate the help. I hope I can get this worked out.
#5
How much time has elapsed since you adjusted it? Maybe it needs some time to adjust itself?

I'm actually quite stumped if all those things don't work. I'm actually not very good with technical stuff compared to my general knowledge.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
There's also the issue of string gauge and tuning. If you're using a fat string gauge, and are keeping the guitar in a lower tuning, such as open C or drop B, then the heavy strings, EAD, may be causing the buzz as you pluck them. Strings tend to vibrate in an elliptical shape. It's not a circle as one would think. Fatter, looser strings will want to vibrate in a bigger pattern than "standard" strings tuned to concert pitch of EADGBe. If any of this is evident with your guitar, then you may need to loosen your truss rod back up again because you've straightened the neck too much and it may need more relief to compensate for those strings. I also recommend that you check the humidity levels in your home. While most electrics aren't subject to drastic changes from changing humidity levels, their necks can certainly suffer right along with an acoustics. I know first hand how this can happen as my Gibson SG's neck is all over the map in the winter as I try to maintain the humidity at about 50%, but it's not always that easy to do, and at times it'll drop down to about 35%. I'll know right away when I pick up my guitar if it's affected the neck or not as it'll be out of tune one way or the other, all sharp or all flat. Remember, electrics are still made out of wood, and therefore they still need some of the same attention that acoustics do. They are just normally more stable in the body area is all.
#7
My strings are all tuned to normal EADGBA. I took a straight edge long enough to cover 3 frets at a time and I did find the 14th fret maybe .005 or .01 high I mean just barely. The thing is this isnt whats buzzing, its the 13th fret buzzing when i'm holding the 12th fret. Crazy thing is I been playing around on it anyway and noticed I also have a buzz on the 6th fret 5th string a bad one.
#8
Is it possible that this Ibanez is just a total piece of crap? I've only played one other guitar and it was a washburn lyon series strat I've had since I was 16 that I strung upside down to play it left handed. That thing played like a dream compared to this thing.

Is a washburn lyon strat alot better than a ibanez grx20l?
#9
^ Highly doubtful. Lyons are crappo Wal-Mart guitars. Alot like First-Act. I'm pretty certain that the Ibanez is of higher quality than those.
I think you should loosen up the truss rod some. Go counterclockwise about 1/4 turn or so and let the guitar sit overnight. The buzzing at the 6th fret of the A string is telling me the neck is now too straight and needs some of that relief back in it to set things right again.
You didn't mention what gauge strings you have on it? Are they .009's or .010's? If they're much fatter than that, that could also be some of your problem. Remember, fatter strings need more clearance to vibrate freely without touching the frets. Think about a bass guitar and how far away from the frets those strings are and you'll get the picture.
You might just want to think about putting a new set of .009's on it and take it from there. The thinner gauge will make for much easier bends, and since you'll be keeping it in standard tuning, this gauge will work fine.
#10
My strings are ernie ball 2221

10
13
17
26
36
47

The neck had a pretty good bow in it when i first bought it (used) and put the strings on it. The bow was very evident from the 5th fret on when looking down saddle to neck. It was buzzing the same with a ton of bow.

To clarify, when I say 'bow' I mean it is bowing in such a fashion as if you were to tighten the strings it would bow in that direction where as (in theory) if i were to loosen the strings it should flatten back out. Assuming its natural state is a flat neck.
#11
On a side, note, is it possible that lyons changed at some point? The lyon series I had was purchased in ~1995 and if i recall was around 300. I called the music shop that it was purchased at and the guy did reassure me that the lyon series then was a totally different guitar than the ones made now. I do see newer ones that are selling for the same price point as those first acts and what not. This one seemed to slightly better quality than the squiers that came out a few years later.
#12
Quote by borderm3
My strings are ernie ball 2221

10
13
17
26
36
47

The neck had a pretty good bow in it when i first bought it (used) and put the strings on it. The bow was very evident from the 5th fret on when looking down saddle to neck. It was buzzing the same with a ton of bow.

To clarify, when I say 'bow' I mean it is bowing in such a fashion as if you were to tighten the strings it would bow in that direction where as (in theory) if i were to loosen the strings it should flatten back out. Assuming its natural state is a flat neck.


Those strings aren't overly huge by any means. You're correct with your idea of neck bow, except the "at rest" state of the neck, i.e; without any string tension applied, should be flat to slightly backbowed, or reverse bowed. The truss rod is going to apply tension to the neck opposite that of the strings, so at rest, the neck should straighten out and may even go to this backbow state. This is ok, it's supposed to work this way. As you bring up the string tension, the neck gives way under this new inward pull and tends to want to straighten out again, and if adjusted for it, will go into an inward bow, giving you the needed fretboard relief. I'm of a mind that I need a little relief to get clear notes. If the neck is too flat, under hard strumming buzzing can occur.
#13
I appreciate the response. So it looks like i'm right on my game with everything, there is just something super screwy going on.
#14
I ended up dropping it off at a music store a few days ago, i'll post what I find out.
#15
My money is on the frets. One needs to be filed down.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#16
This place couldn't figure it out. I'm going to try to shim the front of the neck and see if it doesn't take care of it.

I'm really starting to think its a carpentry issue on the neck. I don't think they planed it properly on the bottom or they didn't route the neck relief properly.
#17
That did the trick. Although the fact that this shim is not a linear shim more so a step shim (for lack of better words) It is not a good setup. I am going to take the neck off and sand down the rear portion of the neck relief on the guitar body to level out the paint work. The paintwork in there is TERRIBLE, its orange peeled bad and hardly level. I think if i take the paint down some it will work perfect.
#18
My neck is shot. Its twisted and stripped.

What all necks will fit a Ibanez GRX20