#1
Ok so I've been playing guitar for a little over 3 years and I feel as if I'm not nearly as good as I could be. So I was just wondering what skills I should have aqquired in that amount of time.

Help would be greatly appreciated, thanks. :]
#3
There isn't really a set of standards that you should know with playing guitar, everyone learns at different paces. It has more to do with how and how often you practice.
#5
I'm about the same as you, I've been playing for like 3.5 years, and I honestly feel I should be better than I am by now. And so instead of being inspired, I become angry for not progressing fast enough and don't try. It's terrible. Don't ever become like that, whatever you do.

As for progressing, I'd suggest learning different modes, like I know the modes for the G maj. scale like the back of my hands now, but I don't really know any others. So do that, maybe learn the modes for a minor scale, and other theory involving that. You know, chord progressions with 7ths 9ths and 11ths and such.

Good luck!


EDIT: ^ What he said, also.
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#6
Wow I got some fast replies.
Umm alright well a thing I seem to have trouble with is tapping but I've been getting better at it, I've slightly dabbled in sweep picking.
I seem to be pretty far behind in theory, or at least I think I am.
I know quite a few scales, most chords, etc.
#7
It will depend from guitarist to guitarist. When you start playing you should have some idea of what you want to learn and what you want to get out of the instrument. This can (and will) change as you progress. So if you started because of your love of metal you would have aquired some different skills to the ones you would aquire if jazz was your thing. Also, how much time do you put into learning i.e. how focused are you on learning theory and developing techniques? When I started playing I just wanted to play guitar and be in a band. Theory was never thought about and techniques came when they needed to but I didn't push myself at all. That would have been almost 10 years ago. In the last 6 months I gained some time and began to look int theory and practising techniques and I have progressed in my skills far, far more than I had in the previous 9 1/2 years.

As to what you should have aquired. I guess a solid idea into theory and techniques but with lots of room for improvement. But it all depends on what you want.
#9
Quote by Myshadow46_2
It will depend from guitarist to guitarist. When you start playing you should have some idea of what you want to learn and what you want to get out of the instrument. This can (and will) change as you progress. So if you started because of your love of metal you would have aquired some different skills to the ones you would aquire if jazz was your thing. Also, how much time do you put into learning i.e. how focused are you on learning theory and developing techniques? When I started playing I just wanted to play guitar and be in a band. Theory was never thought about and techniques came when they needed to but I didn't push myself at all. That would have been almost 10 years ago. In the last 6 months I gained some time and began to look int theory and practising techniques and I have progressed in my skills far, far more than I had in the previous 9 1/2 years.

As to what you should have aquired. I guess a solid idea into theory and techniques but with lots of room for improvement. But it all depends on what you want.


Yeah when I first started off I had wanted to play Alternative/Punk music but obviously my tastes changed.
Um well I'm more of a hands on learner so I learn better when I have someone showing me or a video because I have a tendency to get distracted. Not saying I can't learn by reading but it's not as easy. But if I have someone showing me I'll usually put that technique into my practice repertoire.
Yeah I had a feeling I would have to go into theory, which I know barely anything about..lol.
#10
i've been playing for about a year now, but the 2 guitar teachers i've had both say that i'm better than all of their students. I practice about 7 hours a day tho... Music is pretty much my life. I really just started getting a lot better once i started doing daily exercises for speed and finger endurance, maybe you should try some of those, there are probably some on UG somewhere but i dunno.

I play heavy metal so the type of music i listen to and want to play have probably pushed me farther to becoming a skilled guitarist because metal (the kind i listen to anyway) is fast and all over the place. (children of bodom, all that remains, all shall perish, lamb of god, etc)

right now i think the fastest im playing (cleanly) is 16th's at 216bpm or something (just learned not alone) and sweeping 16th's at something like 155bpm.

NOTE: Metronomes are extremely usefull in getting your endurance, timing and speed up. i didn't use one at first but it really does help.

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
#11
Quote by SPBY
i've been playing for about a year now, but the 2 guitar teachers i've had both say that i'm better than all of their students. I practice about 7 hours a day tho... Music is pretty much my life. I really just started getting a lot better once i started doing daily exercises for speed and finger endurance, maybe you should try some of those, there are probably some on UG somewhere but i dunno.

I play heavy metal so the type of music i listen to and want to play have probably pushed me farther to becoming a skilled guitarist because metal (the kind i listen to anyway) is fast and all over the place. (children of bodom, all that remains, all shall perish, lamb of god, etc)

right now i think the fastest im playing (cleanly) is 16th's at 216bpm or something (just learned not alone) and sweeping 16th's at something like 155bpm.

NOTE: Metronomes are extremely usefull in getting your endurance, timing and speed up. i didn't use one at first but it really does help.


Yeah I listen to ATR and COB as well. I suppose I'll be looking for speed/endurance exercises, haha.

Yeah I'm sure a metronome helps immensely.
#12
The best thing for speed/endurance is chromatic scales. Get a metronome... http://www.metronomeonline.com/ (Online free). Then start slow make sure you have good economy of motion while practicing technique read freepower's sticky in advanced techniques... You want finger independence. Also make sure instead of doing 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 you switch it up like 1234 2341 3412 and etc all sorts of variations. You can look up Steve Vai's 10 hour work out for this or just create the yourself not hard to do its just using all fingers in different patterns...

So just keep practicing its the only way to improve...


EDIT: oh yeah don't just do these finger exercises, learn theory, learn songs, listen to a large variety of music not just metal (Atleast try)... Paul Waggoner of BTBAM said this helped him immensely not saying its your thing but thats just an example they go through so many different types. Practice all types of things is what im saying not just chromatics speed isnt everything
Last edited by Myung'sMusicman at Feb 4, 2009,
#13
Quote by Myung'sMusicman
The best thing for speed/endurance is chromatic scales. Get a metronome... http://www.metronomeonline.com/ (Online free). Then start slow make sure you have good economy of motion while practicing technique read freepower's sticky in advanced techniques... You want finger independence. Also make sure instead of doing 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 you switch it up like 1234 2341 3412 and etc all sorts of variations. You can look up Steve Vai's 10 hour work out for this or just create the yourself not hard to do its just using all fingers in different patterns...

So just keep practicing its the only way to improve...


EDIT: oh yeah don't just do these finger exercises, learn theory, learn songs, listen to a large variety of music not just metal (Atleast try)... Paul Waggoner of BTBAM said this helped him immensely not saying its your thing but thats just an example they go through so many different types. Practice all types of things is what im saying not just chromatics speed isnt everything


Thank you very much, that helped quite a bit.
#14
Quote by Myung'sMusicman
The best thing for speed/endurance is chromatic scales.

not exactly, though it is widely used among guitarists that are focused on shred.

The chromatic scale doesn't have any more effect on speed or endurance than any other scale.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 4, 2009,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
not exactly, though it is widely used among guitarists that are focused on shred.

The chromatic scale doesn't have any more effect on speed or endurance than any other scale.


Touche sir... I was thinking what most guitarists do... So GuitarMunky is correct but both do help speed and endurance
#16
Quote by GuitarMunky
not exactly, though it is widely used among guitarists that are focused on shred.

The chromatic scale doesn't have any more effect on speed or endurance than any other scale.


Exactly this.

Just learn (advanced) solo's to a metronome, that way you learn; speed, endurance, "interesting" rhythms, (possibly)weird shapes, cool note choices, switching fast between different techniques (sweep - tap, picking - tapping - Sweeping, etc. etc.), and you work on vibrato.

+ at the end of it you learned a pretty cool solo

It seems so much more logical to do (learning solo's from ur favourite artists) then to do uninspiring chromatics all day.

I did do it for like a week then I quit. It's uninspiring, and imo you just learn fast blazing 16th patterns, but you won't learn how to connect every lick, and like 80% of the time, people who extensively did that, will sound like a exercise machine., and make threads in MT that go something like....

"I can play 16th's on 200 bpm and all scales, but my solo's sound bland',HELP!!"

Don't say I'm wrong, what is true is true

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 5, 2009,
#17
To the TS: I believe that your question goes "What do I really want/need to learn?" and then take it from that point.
#18
There's not really anything you "should" know, you learn whatever it is you want to learn....if you've played for 20 years and never encountered pinch harmonics then no, you shouldn't know them because you've never tried to play them, if you then want to learn them then what's stopping you?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#19
Quote by outsamahface
Ok so I've been playing guitar for a little over 3 years and I feel as if I'm not nearly as good as I could be. So I was just wondering what skills I should have aqquired in that amount of time.

Help would be greatly appreciated, thanks. :]

Try and expose yourself to lots of different musical genres, you'll come across lots of different licks and chops.
#21
Quote by Myung'sMusicman
Everyone progresses differently. It depends on more of how dedicated you are to the instrument then how long you have played it... So this post is useless and I believe it should be and or will be reported...



why report him. If he has asked an invalid question then fair enough just let it go, but why report him, goon.

to anwer the original question I would say it depends entirely on how often you practice and what you want out of it.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote by zimmzimmer
Maybe your Dads pissed because hes shooting blanks :P