#1
I always knew this theory but I wana know if this is pretty uh... I don't know how to say, let's say I always knew it but somehow I don't know if it's possible or something like that.

As long as the scale matches with the bass note or the chord progression , you can use for example the bass note is E so you can either use E minor or E major on it?

Well that's modal interchange... or wait, it's "Pitch axis" kinda, isn't it? E as the bassline so you can either use on it E Ionian, aeolian, phrygian, etc (modes not in order, just randomly saying)

I'm just asking because I was studying scarified by paul gilbert and yeah, the chorus... or verse, don't know, well , after the intro arghhh looks pretty much like it. But it looks like he's not using the mode but the parrallel scale (E major -> E minor, etc) and I think that's why it sounds pretty "classic" or melancholic.

I feel stupid now, I'm making a lot of threads these days. Well, most of times when I ask those kind of question, I get it right but I'm just not sure of my conclusions =/
#2
If it sounds good, it is good, so panic if you play something that sounds good but makes no sense from a theoretical standpoint.

However, you name whatever you play in relation to the root note, yes. It's common in blues and blues-rock to mix the major pentatonic and blues scales over a progression, something like E major penatonic and E blues over E7 E7 E7 E7 A7 A7 E7 E7 B7 A7 E7 B7. If you were to play a straight E mixolydian lick over that, however, you wouldn't call it A major since E is the root of that progression.

There are a few scenarios where you would play an Fm pentatonic over an E7 chord for a quick chromatic flurry and it would be okay to call it F rather than E, but that's pure chromaticism where you're intentionally deviating from the root. (Ignore this if it confuses you.)
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If it sounds good, it is good, so panic if you play something that sounds good but makes no sense from a theoretical standpoint.

However, you name whatever you play in relation to the root note, yes. It's common in blues and blues-rock to mix the major pentatonic and blues scales over a progression, something like E major penatonic and E blues over E7 E7 E7 E7 A7 A7 E7 E7 B7 A7 E7 B7. If you were to play a straight E mixolydian lick over that, however, you wouldn't call it A major since E is the root of that progression.

There are a few scenarios where you would play an Fm pentatonic over an E7 chord for a quick chromatic flurry and it would be okay to call it F rather than E, but that's pure chromaticism where you're intentionally deviating from the root. (Ignore this if it confuses you.)


Mmm well yeah that's pretty much what I was saying. Thanks a lot, however, there's still something bothering me, but only someone who has analyzed the song scarified could know it kinda... It's about the "classic" sound effect in the part I was talking about in my first post, I have to find out if he's really just using the minor or major of the bass note or he's using some other mode...maybe phrygian.

But I still can find that myself though! Thanks a lot :P
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
What notes is he playing?

You don't need to tell me the answer, though I can help if you do, but that's how you figure out what scale he's using.


It's alright, I'll find all this by myself, anyway there's too much notes and a bunch of modulations kinda :P