#1
Ok I appreciate there is probably already a thread for this, but I can't be bothered to look.

So the other day I slipped on ice (I live in the UK, so anyone else from here knows what I'm talking about) and broke my wrist. Technically it is a Distal Radius Fracture of my right wrist (I'm right-handed), and Im going to be in a cast for the next 4-6 weeks then I can properly start rehabilitating my wrist.

So my question is, to anyone that knows, how long after that will I be healed enough to play properly again? (I usually play for 2-3 hours a day) And is there anything I can do in the mean time to speed up the process?
#2
You should be able to play after your arm is completely healed, as long as it feels comfortable, and there's no pain. If there IS pain, probably wait a day or two, then try again. I'm not sure if if there's way to speed up the healing, but you could take this time to learn music etc. other things related that don't require your wrist.
#3
Quote by Norphin
You should be able to play after your arm is completely healed, as long as it feels comfortable, and there's no pain. If there IS pain, probably wait a day or two, then try again. I'm not sure if if there's way to speed up the healing, but you could take this time to learn music etc. other things related that don't require your wrist.



This is good advice;

But to answer your question TS;

IT depends, probably not to long, it might feel awkward, but I'd say it takes 2 weeks max, depending on if it indeed is painful, and stuff.

i had something similar when I used to skate, but that was 3 weeks of no playing, and I could play within 2 days after that with some flaws on my same level, and about 5 - 6 days it felt "natural" again.

It's like riding ur bike after a long period of no riding. You can still do it, but it just feels a bit unnatural.

You will never lose anything. The only reason people can't play immediately on their old level in any sport/discipline etc after an injury, is not because of their mental state, but the muscles and reflexes in their body are deteriorated.

Unless you got Alzheimer or something similar, you will never "unlearn" what you learned. IT will just gets "lost" in ur head somewhere, but with the right input (in this case picking up ur guitar and play again) Your brain will "re-open" the links again.


That's why through Hypnoses people can remember stuff they have experienced 40+ years ago. Because they "Search" through ur head for the info.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 5, 2009,
#5
It depends largely on the extent of the fracture, you're better off asking the medical people that are looking after you.

Do not rush it, most of the muscles in your arm have tendons that run through the wrist. They compete for a limited space and they all need to be free to move independently. There are a number of highly lubricated, sinewy tunnels that they pass through that can be very easily disrupted after this sort of injury. There is also the issue of muscle wasting after the amount of time it's kept immobile, you should be able to perform normal everyday tasks easily before putting your wrist under any strain with repetitive movements.
#6
If you go to a chirpractor, sometimes they can give you special stuff. Mine gave me these calcium suplements, and these odd bone healing tiny pills. I healed a radial fracture and a broken thumb in 5 weeks casted.
Quote by N_J_B_B



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#7
You will never lose anything. The only reason people can't play immediately on their old level in any sport/discipline etc after an injury, is not because of their mental state, but the muscles and reflexes in their body are deteriorated.

Unless you got Alzheimer or something similar, you will never "unlearn" what you learned.


It is entirely possible for learned procedures to deteriorate over time. This has little to do with "muscles" and a lot to do with the neural mechanisms behind those procedures.

That's why through Hypnoses people can remember stuff they have experienced 40+ years ago. Because they "Search" through ur head for the info.


Yes, and that belief is why hundreds of people were falsely accused of rape and child abuse in the eighties. Hypnosis doesn't work that way.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
It is entirely possible for learned procedures to deteriorate over time. This has little to do with "muscles" and a lot to do with the neural mechanisms behind those procedures.




I'm saying, Memorised stuff stays with you, it just gets lost.

I had a dream some time ago, which when explained to my mom turned out to be a memory of when I was 6 years old.

It felt like I never experienced that, but it was true (it was me who was 6 who smashed my uncle's camera in the space needle in Seattle)

Ur right about the muscles, but that's what I meant sorry, the link between ur brain and muscles detoriate. The signals between ut brain and muscles.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 6, 2009,
#9
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I'm saying, Memorised stuff stays with you, it just gets lost.

I had a dream some time ago, which when explained to my mom turned out to be a memory of when I was 6 years old.

It felt like I never experienced that, but it was true (it was me who was 6 who smashed my uncle's camera in the space needle in Seattle)

Ur right about the muscles, but that's what I meant sorry, the link between ur brain and muscles detoriate. The signals between ut brain and muscles.


It's not the link, it's the brain itself. Memories deteriorate over time, and the same is true of stored sequences of muscle movements. The brain is not an efficient storage device.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
I see what Darren is saying - the memory itself doesn't get lost - the brain's way of pulling up that memory out of storage deteriorates. I think that's a natural mechanism of the way the brain works - if all memories remained equally vivid our conscious minds would become overwhelmed with all the info. Not being a neuroscientist, there is a very good chance that I am talking out of my ass here, but that does explain why sometimes something will trip an old memory and it will come back like it was yesterday.

Anyway, to the original poster - I'd use the time to practice your legato. Maybe when your RH is part way better but not enough for picking, you can use it for muting. Sometimes these mishaps can be a chance to give an area of your playing some intensive love that they wouldn't get otherwise.
#11
So my question is, to anyone that knows, how long after that will I be healed enough to play properly again? (I usually play for 2-3 hours a day) And is there anything I can do in the mean time to speed up the process?


Ask your doctor, not UG.

Don't play through pain, that's the golden rule.