#1
Hi!

Excuse my ignorance, but today I ran into this piece of new about the Jay Turser ATAK Series Guitars...for the truly interested:

http://misc-electric-guitar.jay-turser.en.audiofanzine.com/news/index,idproduit,141550,mao,namm_jay_turser_atak_series_guitars.html

Anyway, this guy Jay Turser says that his guitars are made for shredding and riffing.

So this made me wonder...what specific guitar features facilitate shredding or riffing? Other than they just look bad ass...I'm just a beginner, still learning my chords...have yet to shredd by any means...but would like to hear from others.
#2
Well I don't know about the Jay Turser guitars but a lot of so called 'shred' guitars have insanely low action, thin necks etc. But it's all preference, for e.g. Malmsteen uses a Fender Strat with scalloped frets to shred and I don't think he has ridiculously low action or a very thin neck, Buckethead uses a Les Paul (its customised though). You pick up a guitar and check it's playability, sound etc and if you like it and you find it comfortable for shred or blues or whatever, you buy it. When I played my friends Ibanez which had extremely low action and a really thin neck, the low action was great for leads but i didn't like the neck (neither did he).
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#4
materials the guitar is made of to get that heavy metal tone as well as the pickups are probably higher output (hotter). shredders probably would go for a lower action but factory actions usually blow so idk cuz i dont have ne experience with shredding or jay turser.
#5
Its all about comfort and making the notes easy to hit. a "shredding" guitar typically has light strings like .009-.042s, jumbo frets so you can dig in for bends more and tall frets are also more responsive to fingertapping and hammer-ons and pull offs, and usually a thin neck with a satin finish and action as low as possible sometimes even sacrificing a small amount of fret buzz in certain areas of the neck. theyre usually 25.5'' scale length sacrificing a little reach on the top five frets but giving you more space above the 12th to manuver. if you want to try out a shred guitar check out just about any ibanez S series or RG series. they fit the bill in all those categories but remember its comfort thats the issue. all those atributes just make it feel easier to play insanely fast and float over the neck rather than digging into the riffage. if you feel better shredding on a gretch country gentleman over an ibanez than by all means go for it.
#6
Usually "shred" guitars sport humbuckers and Floyd Rose trem. Thin neck has nothing to do with fast imo. Having thin neck is only useful if you have small hands.
#7
It's all in the player. Any company that says 'good for shredding/riffing' is generally just using them as keywords to get your attention.
#11
Quote by Powerslave619
by what measure do you arrive at that conclusion?

A rather biased opinion.
#12
Shred guitars are usually a few different things

-Thin Neck
-Flat Fretboard I mean like really flat
-Low Action
-And sometimes scalloped frets.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#13
A rather biased opinion

XD

Its just comfort. If you can play fast on it, then its shred enough for you.
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it's all coming back

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#14
I play a les paul with a quite thin neck, Jumbo frets and .12 strings tuned to standard D and I can shred. Shredding and riffing's all about technique. Sure, you'll play faster with your ultra thin neck, high output pickups, xxxxxxxxjumbo frets and .08 strings, but if you can't play it on other guitars, you still suck.
IMO!
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#15
Quote by LordPino
I play a les paul with a quite thin neck, Jumbo frets and .12 strings tuned to standard D and I can shred. Shredding and riffing's all about technique. Sure, you'll play faster with your ultra thin neck, high output pickups, xxxxxxxxjumbo frets and .08 strings, but if you can't play it on other guitars, you still suck.
IMO!



Well actually not neccesarily. Everyone has their own preference as to what style guitar they like to play. If I had to go from my RG to say your les paul It would take me a while to adjust to the new guitar and thicker neck, that doesnt mean I suck it just means im used to something different. I bet if I handed you my RG and said play something youd be put off by the neck thickness at first and trust me it actually is harder than you think to switch neck styles ive done it before.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#16
I once compared a PRS SE custom (not so thin neck) with a Ibanez RG series of the same price (thinner neck) for shredding...the PRS won hands down.


it's just what you prefer really
Quote by Demonikk
'Practice amp' = amp you practice with? In my case, Peavey 6505+ and 4x12
I don't do things small


Except children.
#17
Quote by Lethal Dosage
Well actually not neccesarily. Everyone has their own preference as to what style guitar they like to play. If I had to go from my RG to say your les paul It would take me a while to adjust to the new guitar and thicker neck, that doesnt mean I suck it just means im used to something different. I bet if I handed you my RG and said play something youd be put off by the neck thickness at first and trust me it actually is harder than you think to switch neck styles ive done it before.

True.
Imagine going from Ibanez RG to a baritone. :O
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#18
Quote by Lethal Dosage
Well actually not neccesarily. Everyone has their own preference as to what style guitar they like to play. If I had to go from my RG to say your les paul It would take me a while to adjust to the new guitar and thicker neck, that doesnt mean I suck it just means im used to something different. I bet if I handed you my RG and said play something youd be put off by the neck thickness at first and trust me it actually is harder than you think to switch neck styles ive done it before.


Yes I know. But I was talking about these kids that call themselves tr00 guitar players because they can play 'f*kkin f4st 4s l1ten1ng' on their superstrats, but when you give them a regular guitar they fail. I have my les paul AND a bass guitar ( and some acoustic guitars) and I can play every lick, every solo( though sometimes I need more strings than that bass guitar has(A)) on those guitars.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#19
Quote by LordPino
Yes I know. But I was talking about these kids that call themselves tr00 guitar players because they can play 'f*kkin f4st 4s l1ten1ng' on their superstrats, but when you give them a regular guitar they fail. I have my les paul AND a bass guitar ( and some acoustic guitars) and I can play every lick, every solo( though sometimes I need more strings than that bass guitar has(A)) on those guitars.


Alright I understand now I thought you were saying that when cause I would need to adjust to a new neck to be able to play well that I sucked, I misunderstood your point there.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#20
Quote by Lethal Dosage
Alright I understand now I thought you were saying that when cause I would need to adjust to a new neck to be able to play well that I sucked, I misunderstood your point there.


Yeah sorry that was my mistake. But I truely hate those guys. They NEED a superstrat + .08 strings + Herman Ri Shredding Ressons in order to play fast
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#21
Quote by LordPino
Yeah sorry that was my mistake. But I truely hate those guys. They NEED a superstrat + .08 strings + Herman Ri Shredding Ressons in order to play fast




Yeah very true im actually learning to play shred on 11's right now
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#22
Quote by Powerslave619
by what measure do you arrive at that conclusion?

EMGs have the worst cleans.
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#23
no real shredder needs a superstrat... most of them use normal strats....

heck i think there's a few japanese that use .11 strings, but I guess that all comes down to personal preference
Quote by Demonikk
'Practice amp' = amp you practice with? In my case, Peavey 6505+ and 4x12
I don't do things small


Except children.
#24
Quote by Lethal Dosage


Yeah very true im actually learning to play shred on 11's right now


I shred with .12s and always have. I started shredding on these .12s and I'm keeping them on till I need to replace them. I'll go for 0.9s or .10s then, but then atleast I have built up some strength and stuff.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#25
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
Its all about comfort and making the notes easy to hit. a "shredding" guitar typically has light strings like .009-.042s, jumbo frets so you can dig in for bends more and tall frets are also more responsive to fingertapping and hammer-ons and pull offs, and usually a thin neck with a satin finish and action as low as possible sometimes even sacrificing a small amount of fret buzz in certain areas of the neck. theyre usually 25.5'' scale length sacrificing a little reach on the top five frets but giving you more space above the 12th to manuver. if you want to try out a shred guitar check out just about any ibanez S series or RG series. they fit the bill in all those categories but remember its comfort thats the issue. all those atributes just make it feel easier to play insanely fast and float over the neck rather than digging into the riffage. if you feel better shredding on a gretch country gentleman over an ibanez than by all means go for it.

two of the best shredders of all time joe satch and steve via both use ernie ball skinny top heavy bottomm strings