#3
they're barely metalcore; this is more for the metal forum though - avant-garde metal i spose

they are very cool, however
⚑⚑⚑⚑⚑
#6
Hmm, not too shabby, the first song (awake) the vocals are nice but it sounds almost straight up numetal/melodeath. The rest of the songs are nice though, wish there was a little more elaborate riffing, but a solid band.
Quote by AluminumOxide
Cobain killed himself before he learned to play guitar.

Gibson SG Special
Schecter C1-Plus
#7
REALLY strong Devin Townsend influence. To the point where I'd ask if the vocal melody in Awake was taken straight from a DT song.
They're extraordinarily boring though. They sound like another radio-friendly nu metal band.
#9
Quote by Magero
LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL.


I only heard one song (awake), so all my judgement is coming from that. During the heavier part, there were some cool Meshuggah-esque parts, but the first part sounded like a radio friendly nu metal band who stole a Devin Townsend melody.
Periphery does it better
Last edited by saxaxe at Feb 12, 2009,
#10
Quote by saxaxe

I only heard one song (awake), so all my judgement is coming from that. During the heavier part, there were some cool Meshuggah-esque parts, but the first part sounded like a radio friendly nu metal band who stole a Devin Townsend melody.
Periphery does it better

Hell yeah Periphery does it better, it's funny whenever I hear a band like this and all I'm thinking is "Where's bulb when you need him"
Quote by AluminumOxide
Cobain killed himself before he learned to play guitar.

Gibson SG Special
Schecter C1-Plus
#12
Quote by Magero
I see Bulb has become the new international standard of "playing Meshuggah".
Fantastic.

It's funny you say that because I had heard good things about Meshuggah but when I finally checked them out I really couldn't stand them. Periphery is much different imo, the only thing they have in common really is the 7-string element. Also, why is it so bad that a passionate guitarist (he's very involved in his band and loves giving fans more when they ask for it) is getting recognized?
Quote by AluminumOxide
Cobain killed himself before he learned to play guitar.

Gibson SG Special
Schecter C1-Plus
#13
Quote by Magero
I see Bulb has become the new international standard of "playing Meshuggah".
Fantastic.

Why is that bad? I thought you preached Extended Range Guitars.
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#14
I think as far as playing that style of music goes, Bulb's one of the best. TesseracT and Bulb/Periphery/Animals as Leaders are my favorites of that style, and I'd say the best.

EDIT:
And Sikth. Forgot them.
Last edited by saxaxe at Feb 12, 2009,
#16
I just find it interesting that anyone who used polyrhythms and low tuned guitars was labelled as a Meshuggah rip off, now it's Bulb.
The torch has been passed so to speak.
#17
Quote by Magero
I just find it interesting that anyone who used polyrhythms and low tuned guitars was labelled as a Meshuggah rip off, now it's Bulb.
The torch has been passed so to speak.

Fair Enough
Quote by saxaxe
EDIT:And Sikth. Forgot them.

How dare you sir, I said good day!
Quote by AluminumOxide
Cobain killed himself before he learned to play guitar.

Gibson SG Special
Schecter C1-Plus
#18
Quote by Magero
I just find it interesting that anyone who used polyrhythms and low tuned guitars was labelled as a Meshuggah rip off, now it's Bulb.
The torch has been passed so to speak.

Well I wouldn't really label them as a rip off, but it's definitely a distinct sound that a lot of bands are starting to follow. If you listen to TesseracT, Bulb/Periphery, After The Burial, Sikth, Textures, Fellsilent, etc there's definitely a very distinct sound, which is even a lot different than Meshuggah.
In that sound, I just think Bulb, TesseracT and Sikth are definitely the top of the game.
#19
Quote by saxaxe
If you listen to TesseracT, Bulb/Periphery, After The Burial, Sikth, Textures, Fellsilent, etc there's definitely a very distinct sound, which is even a lot different than Meshuggah.
In that sound, I just think Bulb, TesseracT and Sikth are definitely the top of the game.

I don't understand why Meshuggah is held on a pedestal like that, judging from the album I heard, it seemed very uninspired and to be honest, wasn't very technical. This is kind of my bias but Sikth is leaps and bounds above all the bands mentioned in terms of creativity and technicality, much more intricately written guitar parts melded together to form songs that (to me) created something I had never heard before, and still haven't.
Quote by AluminumOxide
Cobain killed himself before he learned to play guitar.

Gibson SG Special
Schecter C1-Plus
#20
Quote by Rufiothebandito
I don't understand why Meshuggah is held on a pedestal like that, judging from the album I heard, it seemed very uninspired and to be honest, wasn't very technical. This is kind of my bias but Sikth is leaps and bounds above all the bands mentioned in terms of creativity and technicality, much more intricately written guitar parts melded together to form songs that (to me) created something I had never heard before, and still haven't.

On the surface, it does seem that way, but when you analyze the time signatures and the polyrhythmic and polymetric phrases, Meshuggah's are a lot more complex than most other bands. For example, New Millennium Cyanide Christ is 4/4 over 25/16.
#21
No.
It's all in 4/4.
And even then, if you sub-divide it, it's 23/16 over 4/4.
Meshuggah are held on a high pedestel because they did it first. Before any of these other bands doing the off time chug riffs, Meshuggah were doing it. They've continued to have a unique sound that no one else has been able to touch, even all these bands that have taken elements and added their own touch. Meshuggah are the ultimate example of "If you don't get it, you won't like it." That's all there is to it.
#22
Quote by Magero
No.
It's all in 4/4.
And even then, if you sub-divide it, it's 23/16 over 4/4.
Meshuggah are held on a high pedestel because they did it first. Before any of these other bands doing the off time chug riffs, Meshuggah were doing it. They've continued to have a unique sound that no one else has been able to touch, even all these bands that have taken elements and added their own touch. Meshuggah are the ultimate example of "If you don't get it, you won't like it." That's all there is to it.

Oh my bad, got my numbers wrong. I've gotten in the habit of sub-dividing their stuff, or at least referring to it as such.
Otherwise, I agree with what you said. The music is really bland on the surface, but yea, "If you don't get it, you won't like it" is a good way to say it.
#23
Sub-dividing is a much easier way of making them sound cooler. Rational Gaze works out to be something like 13/8. But it's all 4/4 if you count it how they count it.
#24
Quote by Magero
Sub-dividing is a much easier way of making them sound cooler. Rational Gaze works out to be something like 13/8. But it's all 4/4 if you count it how they count it.

Yea. If you look at the guitar phrases individually though, without taking into account the 4/4 beat, the repeating of the phrases puts them into the wacky time signatures.
Even though they count it in 4/4, the guitar parts really are in the weird time signatures, even if the song itself can be completely counted in 4/4 with the phrases restarting mid-measure.

Did that make any sense? haha
#25
It does, but it's taking it too heavily.
Meshuggah's guitar parts can be counted in 4/4. Easily.
Yes, if you count them in their repeats it works out to 13/8 or 23/16 or 13/16 or whatever, but that's making things too messy. The entire idea of polyrhythms is to have everything work its way around, whether it's in 4 bars or 15 bars.
#27
Ever since watching an interview with Fredrik and Marten, I count it all in 4/4 now. Just follow the hi-hat and snare 9 times out of 10. I love when people try and claim "IT WOULD BE SO HARD TO HEAD BANG TO MESHUGGAH". Makes me laugh. "Just means you can't count to 4."

Speaking of which. My band has a song with a riff in 7/4 (woo, technical ) and because it's at like, 120bpm, I just headbang on the 2.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
So that I'm coming down on the 1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3, 5, 7, etc.

My guitarist got up me because everyone else in the band just jerks their head up on the 1 again and he was saying that people will get confused.
#28
Quote by Magero
Ever since watching an interview with Fredrik and Marten, I count it all in 4/4 now. Just follow the hi-hat and snare 9 times out of 10. I love when people try and claim "IT WOULD BE SO HARD TO HEAD BANG TO MESHUGGAH". Makes me laugh. "Just means you can't count to 4."

Speaking of which. My band has a song with a riff in 7/4 (woo, technical ) and because it's at like, 120bpm, I just headbang on the 2.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
So that I'm coming down on the 1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3, 5, 7, etc.

My guitarist got up me because everyone else in the band just jerks their head up on the 1 again and he was saying that people will get confused.


When I listen to Meshuggah, I usually just follow the hat and snare, but every once in a while, I try to listen to the bass drum/guitar just cuz.
#29
Quote by Magero
It does, but it's taking it too heavily.
Meshuggah's guitar parts can be counted in 4/4. Easily.
Yes, if you count them in their repeats it works out to 13/8 or 23/16 or 13/16 or whatever, but that's making things too messy. The entire idea of polyrhythms is to have everything work its way around, whether it's in 4 bars or 15 bars.


ARGHHHHHHHHHHHHH that's not polyrhythms, THAT'S polyMETRE's.

/Pedantic terminology explosion.
#31
haha, well there is some polyrhythmic stuff in their music, but what you described was polymeter's, the easiest difference is with polyrhythms, both instruments will start and end in the same place, but every other note will sound off, so it will create like a rhythmic pulse that brings itself in and out of alignment.

An easy example is 3 over 4...

wait...I am not explaining it all over again...lol
#34
going back to the whole "4/4" thing, it's amazing how many people don't get that no matter what the time signature is, you can usually fit it into a 4/4 measure somehow, using triplets, double-dotted notes and such.

it's probably just easier to read in 13/8 or whatever.
⚑⚑⚑⚑⚑
#35
Quote by RPExecutor
going back to the whole "4/4" thing, it's amazing how many people don't get that no matter what the time signature is, you can usually fit it into a 4/4 measure somehow, using triplets, double-dotted notes and such.

it's probably just easier to read in 13/8 or whatever.

Well the way Meshuggah's songs are written, if you break it apart the hi hat and cymbal are in 4/4 and the gutar/bass pattern, which the bass drum follows is usually in a different meter. The band, even the guitarists, counts all the songs in 4/4, just without the phrases ending at the end of the measure.
#36
Perfect example of this "everything goes into 4/4" thing.
My band has a song we play live now, main riff, when I first tabbed it out, was;
23/16, 15/8, 23/16
I went back and had a better look.
It was actually;
4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 4/4
In triplets
#37
Quote by Magero
Perfect example of this "everything goes into 4/4" thing.
My band has a song we play live now, main riff, when I first tabbed it out, was;
23/16, 15/8, 23/16
I went back and had a better look.
It was actually;
4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 4/4
In triplets


Yeah, but how is it accented, and what does it sound like in relationship to the rest of the song, that's what defines the time signature - not necessarily what is the easiest way of reading it.