#1
So Im trying to get my chops up on some speedier stuff as far electric guitar goes, and I was wondering if it was bad to be watching videos from guys like Paul Gilbert, Yngwie Malmsteen, Michael Angelo Batio, and Nuno Bettencourt?

I know most people say to pick up some videos and stuff and that teachers are your best bet, and not to try to watch other famous players alot cause you start to sound like them, so I was just wondering if it was bad for me to be trying to learn to play fast like these guys?
#2
Those are good guitarists but don't set the bar to their level or you'll be disappointed and frustrated if you don't get to play at their level right away.
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#3
Quote by music_mike
I know most people say...not to try to watch other famous players alot cause you start to sound like them...

Don't listen to the people that are telling you that cause they're full of ****.

The best way to learn is to listen to people you admire and try to pick up some of the techniques they use in their playing that you admire.

It's like saying if you were a painter you shouldn't look at other peoples paintings or if you're writer you shouldn't read other peoples books. It's just an insane thing to say.

If you want to play like those people the best thing you can do is study their playing and learn their songs. You can still develop your own style too. Your style comes from you expressing yourself - not by shutting other artists out of your mind.
Si
#4
Quote by LazyLatinoRocke
Those are good guitarists but don't set the bar to their level or you'll be disappointed and frustrated if you don't get to play at their level right away.

+1 i'm pretty decent and i've been playing for 13 years and i'm nowhere near their level of sheer badassery.... and i'm reminded of it everytime i watch one of their videos.
#5
I'd say it's great. I always try to learn from every source I can, and taking things from different sources will make your playing more varied and unique. What's there to lose?
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#6
Well yeah, like I don't expect to watch a couple of videos of Gilbert's and then go pick up my guitar tomorrow and be able to shred like him.. But a couple of people I know who also play guitar had basically told me to shut out people like that because I wouldn't learn anything that would add to my playing, but rather I would learn to emulate their sound identically and end up being a "imitation sell out" as one of them so nicely put it...

I just think those guys are great. Not only in their "badassery" of sound, but more so in their playing technique and fluidity of speed and skill... I dont want to learn to sound like them but rather pickup some of their ability to play smoothly, as well as faster then I do now, and have it sound good... I guess mainly I hope that by watching these guys, who I kind of look up to in the world of guitar, I hope to be able to pick up some of theirs and work on my own technique...
#7
There's absolutely nothing wrong with checking out those guys. In fact, Check out EVERYBODY. But realize that those players got to their level by spending hours and hours and hours working on their instrument. If you're dedicated and willing to put in the work, you can achieve anything you want.
Now get off the computer and go practice!
There's my way and the wrong way.
#8
Quote by seth's daddy
There's absolutely nothing wrong with checking out those guys. In fact, Check out EVERYBODY. But realize that those players got to their level by spending hours and hours and hours working on their instrument. If you're dedicated and willing to put in the work, you can achieve anything you want.
Now get off the computer and go practice!

Trust me man, if I could I would... But right now my guitar is pulled apart being refinished and fixed up a bit... But when I do have it fixed and working I usually try to play at least 4 hours a day... I know I should play more, but right now I just really cant due to a busy outside schedule...
#10
Well would like watching some of their techniques and getting those down a bit then playing to backing tracks help? Cause I don't have a metronome...
#11
The truth is, we will never sound like them, no matter how hard we try. You will however get to a point where you 'think' you sound like them and thats when your own voice on the guitar starts coming out and you adapt the way you play.

If your fear is sounding like them (of which I shared that fear many years ago, oh what a fool I was), then your best bet is to watch it without your guitar. Once its finished, you take that knowledge and adapt it immediately into your playing... your way. I've been watching Eric Johnson's Toatal Electric Guitar for years (the amount of styles and subjects he covers in those 90 mins is astounding, hence it takes forever for me) and each time I watch it, I just take what I need at that point in time. (not including the tears i suffer afterwards in the knowledge that I'll never be "that" good!)

Another you can learn from is Brett Garsed. His second contribution is very cool but his first one has the smoothest legato and hybrid picking. Very calm and collected and not "i'm better than you" type of teaching.

If you one day get to a very advanced level and want to learn more, then you can get Richie Kotzen's "Rock Chops" and basically change your pants after every viewing. He is ridiculously amazing, and probably only 19 at the time which makes it worse. 17 would be alot worse.

If you would like to work on getting your solo's to sound more vocal-like instead of heartless string wankage, then watch Kee Marcello's REH guitar video (can't remember the title or it didn't have one). Its cool watching a poodle play guitar but when he does, his hair becomes less of a distraction and his playing leaves you in awe. Good principles in that video.

Tomo Fujita teaches you how to play inside the metronome beat, using it like a drummer for the snare on 2 and 4. Also a mish-mash of styles happening but I guess thats why he teaches at Berklee.

Frank Gambale's videos, especially the early ones, go thru theory and shredding to your hearts content. However the latest one, "Concert with class", is way out there. Totally different level of playing. That dude is 3 or 4 spheres above everyone else in composing and playing. Won't advise that one.

Andy Timmons is great to have as well. Monster of a player but so sweet to listen to but frustrating to watch (like Eric Johnson) because he makes the sweetest licks but difficult for the regular folk to pull off well. Not being judgemental, watch the Satriani clip with him. He outplays Satch with minimal effort. Watch the Ibanez anniversary clip with Timmons, Gilbert and Vai. Once again, makes em look like fools and he's mostly playing rhythm.

The reason I went off on all these different videos was 1. To give you an idea of nice things to watch and 2. To always take what you need at one point or another instead of learning the whole video.

Hope this helps, enjoy and happy hunting.
#12
See you favourite players as ingredients.

IF you only take stuff from 1, you will sound like him.
If you add more ingredients (playing styles) to ur own, you get more.

The trick is to keep mixing until you come up with ur own recipe which is ur playing style.

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#13
Quote by music_mike
Well would like watching some of their techniques and getting those down a bit then playing to backing tracks help? Cause I don't have a metronome...


just dont try playing faster than you can play...
also, get a metronome. they help with timing etc.
#14
One thing people tend to forget when trying to emulate guys like that is the sheer amount of musical knowledge and experience they have. They didn't get good by watching shredders on youtube, the internet hadn't even been invented! they got good by immersing themselves in the instrument without being blinkered by childish crap like genres. I've no doubt they got even better from picking up bits and bobs from their peers, but ultimately they did it for themselves, shutting themselves away and practicing for hours on end. Most importantly, they knew HOW to practice, working on things until they were perfect and not compromising accuracy because they were too impatient for things to happen naturally. Getting to their level, in terms of technical ability and musicianship takes years of hard work and dedication. Sure, there's kids who can sweep lightining arpeggios after a year, but the problem is that's usually ALL they can play, they focus all their effort on learning their showboat party pieces, but along the way they forget to learn how to play the guitar.

I'm get frustrated by all the crap around here that contains lines like "I only play metal..." , "How to sound like Frusciante..., "How to play like Syn...", "What do I need to learn to shred" etc. That approach gets you nowhere in the long run, if you've picked up the guitar just to emulate one genre, one band or, even worse, one player then you'll only ever get so far. I'll admit I picked up the guitar because there was a few players that really inspired me, but as soon as I had the thing then there I wanted to explore it, I wanted to hear different ways the guitar could be played and sound, and I honesty think that if picking up a guitar doesn't automatically spark the urge to hunt down new music and explore different genres then there's something wrong with you. The one's that do well are the guys that simply "learn to play the guitar", and to that end expose themselves to as many aspects of it as possible.
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#15
Quote by steven seagull
One thing people tend to forget when trying to emulate guys like that is the sheer amount of musical knowledge and experience they have. They didn't get good by watching shredders on youtube, the internet hadn't even been invented! they got good by immersing themselves in the instrument without being blinkered by childish crap like genres. I've no doubt they got even better from picking up bits and bobs from their peers, but ultimately they did it for themselves, shutting themselves away and practicing for hours on end. Most importantly, they knew HOW to practice, working on things until they were perfect and not compromising accuracy because they were too impatient for things to happen naturally. Getting to their level, in terms of technical ability and musicianship takes years of hard work and dedication. Sure, there's kids who can sweep lightining arpeggios after a year, but the problem is that's usually ALL they can play, they focus all their effort on learning their showboat party pieces, but along the way they forget to learn how to play the guitar.

I'm get frustrated by all the crap around here that contains lines like "I only play metal..." , "How to sound like Frusciante..., "How to play like Syn...", "What do I need to learn to shred" etc. That approach gets you nowhere in the long run, if you've picked up the guitar just to emulate one genre, one band or, even worse, one player then you'll only ever get so far. I'll admit I picked up the guitar because there was a few players that really inspired me, but as soon as I had the thing then there I wanted to explore it, I wanted to hear different ways the guitar could be played and sound, and I honesty think that if picking up a guitar doesn't automatically spark the urge to hunt down new music and explore different genres then there's something wrong with you. The one's that do well are the guys that simply "learn to play the guitar", and to that end expose themselves to as many aspects of it as possible.


Amen! My sentiments exactly
#16
Quote by steven seagull
One thing people tend to forget when trying to emulate guys like that is the sheer amount of musical knowledge and experience they have. They didn't get good by watching shredders on youtube, the internet hadn't even been invented! they got good by immersing themselves in the instrument without being blinkered by childish crap like genres. I've no doubt they got even better from picking up bits and bobs from their peers, but ultimately they did it for themselves, shutting themselves away and practicing for hours on end. Most importantly, they knew HOW to practice, working on things until they were perfect and not compromising accuracy because they were too impatient for things to happen naturally. Getting to their level, in terms of technical ability and musicianship takes years of hard work and dedication. Sure, there's kids who can sweep lightining arpeggios after a year, but the problem is that's usually ALL they can play, they focus all their effort on learning their showboat party pieces, but along the way they forget to learn how to play the guitar.

I'm get frustrated by all the crap around here that contains lines like "I only play metal..." , "How to sound like Frusciante..., "How to play like Syn...", "What do I need to learn to shred" etc. That approach gets you nowhere in the long run, if you've picked up the guitar just to emulate one genre, one band or, even worse, one player then you'll only ever get so far. I'll admit I picked up the guitar because there was a few players that really inspired me, but as soon as I had the thing then there I wanted to explore it, I wanted to hear different ways the guitar could be played and sound, and I honesty think that if picking up a guitar doesn't automatically spark the urge to hunt down new music and explore different genres then there's something wrong with you. The one's that do well are the guys that simply "learn to play the guitar", and to that end expose themselves to as many aspects of it as possible.



completely agree. I had a big problem with the other guitarist in my band for a while because he wanted so bad to be like syn, to which I said, "dude, I don't give a fuck about being like any other guitarist. You know who I want be like? you know who's playing style I'm working at emulating? ME! I want to play like me."

He finally got the point after months of me keeping at it and he finally understood what I was talking about. Now he's still really into A7X and all that shit, but he no longer wants to be like syn, he understands that influences are what it's all about.


Right now I'm working on expanding his musical horizons, he's predominately into metal-core and as such, that was the way he wrote for a long time, but he's starting to get out of that, it still has a little metal-core vibe to it, but it's becoming more unique, especially when me and him work together on songs. My unorthodox/odd style combined with with his slightly metal-core influences turns out some pretty cool stuff.

I mean, metal is my favorite kind of music, but I like it all. hell, I played some country shit at a birthday party with a couple of guys my dad works with and I enjoyed it!
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Feb 6, 2009,
#17
Yes it's very bad. You might just learn something:O:O!!!

Everyone has it's own unique way of playing licks and stuff, and who knows, you might just play stuff better after watching others play stuff. It really works. That's why you should play with others as much as you can.
#19
Wow! Thanks yall for all of yalls help... I consider myself an intermediate player because I can pick up on things, guitar wise, easier now then I used to be able to and I can play alot better then when I started... But even still, Im not well versed in theory and the like... Everything yall have said has given me great areas and ways to start looking more into actual musical theory and really learning to play... Yall are a great help and I really appreciate it...
#20
Quote by The4thHorsemen
dude, I don't give a fuck about being like any other guitarist. You know who I want be like? you know who's playing style I'm working at emulating? ME! I want to play like me


I am probably the best 'me' style player in the world, I've yet to see anybody quite as good as myself in this respect

sentiment: approved
#21
i see a few people have already hinted at what i'm gonna say...

the things you should be taking away from Paul Gilbert and Michael Angelo and whatever other influence you have are purely technical. If you hear a sound on the guitar, and you don't know how to make it, learn it from these guys. Learn good habits from them, like positional play, alternate picking, finding fretboard patterns, etc... if you watch the videos, you'll see that they talk extensively about these things, and less about why they chose the notes they used when they wrote the song.

you should take the technique lessons you learn from great players, and get inspired by the music they make, but remember that at the end of the day, it's YOU that has to figure out how to make YOUR guitar sound badass. it's your own style, and you need to have a unique one. none of your heroes got famous for having someone else's playing style, did they?
Last edited by frigginjerk at Feb 7, 2009,
#22
I always think this video sums it up - these are arguably two of the most technically adept guitarists ever, but they can also whip riffs out on demand AND name the guitarist who played them. They know their chops, but they also know their music too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgLSk_ZKv1k
Actually called Mark!

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#23
Yeah, Im not hoping to steal their sound or their tone or anything like that, but I would love to be able to steal some of their techniques and be able to adapt them to my style of playing... I like being able to sound different, but i just want to be able to sound "better"... If that makes any sense...
#24
Man, guitarists are silly sometimes. I mean, transpose this into some other field or subject. Would a young scientist in grad school not want to learn from Einstein, if he had the opportunity?

Learn everything you possibly can from everyone and everything. Your style will be different from those guys, because you a different person - you will put things together differently. And really, every musicians eventual style is the result of stealing hundreds of different ideas from different musicians and putting them together in their own way.