#1
I have a question - I'm trying to get things right from the start.

I read (somewhere) about making sure that the fingers meet the fretboard at right angles. Now that seems to work well for chords, plus, I'm a pianist, so it feels right and intuitive to me.

But, I was watching Freepower's video on muting unwanted strings (you mean I need to do that???) and also another lesson here where you bar the upper strings while hammering something a little higher up, then that barring finger is magically in the right place for the next note on a different string. Now if I hadn't seen that video, I would have tackled it with my index finger fretting the string as normal, then moving string for the next note. Is this a technique that's used a lot?

So what I'm picking up is that a lot of the time, the index finger is nowhere near right angles to the fretboard. It's more like parallel. And then it needs to turn a little to bar on its boney side, which opens up the hand in a really strange way. Am I getting this right?
#2
To be honest I don't think too many people do actually have their fingers at right angles though I may be wrong. From what you described it sounds as though you're doing everything right so far, but I'm confused by this bit:
bar the upper strings while hammering something a little higher up, then that barring finger is magically in the right place for the next note on a different string
#3
You shouldn't pay that much attention to your finger placement, pay lot's of attention on what kind of sound you're getting from your technique and then try to get comfortable with your fingers so that they produce the right tone ant articulation you want to hear. There's really no "right" finger placement, just a lot of options with their own qualities.
#4
Are you talking about playing notes with you index barred and you keep it barred while you play and move your other fingers to hit the notes? I can't really explain it, but I think thats what you're saying and if so, that's how I do it. And alot of other guitarists, ALOT.
#5
I always find right-angle finger placement rather soulless. It allows you to do many technically proficient things, but gets in the way of expression. In my opinion. Plus I played violin for a long time before I played guitar so I got used to having my thumb resting on the left side of the neck rather than underneath the neck.
#6
Quote by \m/Angus\m/
Are you talking about playing notes with you index barred and you keep it barred while you play and move your other fingers to hit the notes? I can't really explain it, but I think thats what you're saying and if so, that's how I do it. And alot of other guitarists, ALOT.



Yes that's what I mean. Thanks guys that helps a lot!
#7
But, I was watching Freepower's video on muting unwanted strings (you mean I need to do that???)


Definately, especially if you want to play with high gain or distortion.

Basically, the first finger is an exception to this rule. Bar chords and muting require you use it as you've said - parallel to the strings. There are of course, plenty of little licks and such that require you use your index differently, but that's life, eh?
#8
Quote by Freepower
Definately, especially if you want to play with high gain or distortion.



bugger.

thanks.
#9
Quote by Freepower
Definately, especially if you want to play with high gain or distortion.

Basically, the first finger is an exception to this rule. Bar chords and muting require you use it as you've said - parallel to the strings. There are of course, plenty of little licks and such that require you use your index differently, but that's life, eh?

You mean perpendicular to the strings. Parallel would have your finger going in the same direction as the strings.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
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#10
I mean parallel to the plane of the strings, not their length.

I understand I was inelegant but the threadstarter had used the term in that context and I was answering him directly.
#11
When I play my fingers are pretty much perpendicular to the strings. I just found this way easier as I could fret the chords / strings cleanly and comfortably.
#12
Thanks, I'm finding the responses helpful, and I do understand them. Parallel this way, not that way! lol It does make sense somehow.

Learning the lingo is as much a challenge at anything else. My 3rd finger becomes my second finger, the top string is at the bottom and the bottom string is at the top, and please don't call it the 6th string because I have no idea where to start counting from. I know, let's call it the E string, that way there can be no confusion!
#15
Quote by YourVillain
I always find right-angle finger placement rather soulless. It allows you to do many technically proficient things, but gets in the way of expression. In my opinion. Plus I played violin for a long time before I played guitar so I got used to having my thumb resting on the left side of the neck rather than underneath the neck.


Which expressive techniques favour a flatter fretting style?