#1
yes, i have read the stickies and i don't believe this is covered.

i want to use the modes in more of a hard-rock context, and having major 7ths and dominant 7ths don't exactly work when you have a fair bit of gain on. so my question is if i was to write a progression that specified one particular mode (for instance E Phrygian), how would i go about that? and would i be limited to making vamps? or could i expand into a larger chord progression?
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#2
If you'd want to make it into an actual progression, you'd have to really analyze the movement of the chords and make sure you're not stranding into "tonal" territory, obviously.

For power chords, just take out the third (or second, or fourth, for suspended chords).

E Phrygian: E5 - F5 etc.

Your note choice also is of great importance when playing modally, imo.
#3
Quote by aradine

i want to use the modes in more of a hard-rock context, and having major 7ths and dominant 7ths don't exactly work when you have a fair bit of gain on.


Sure they do. Gain doesn't matter which notes you use for a chord. It's more the number of notes. The bass player has the root covered. You could use a 3rd and a 7th, or a 5th and 7th, or whatever.

A modal progression doesn't have to be a vamp. Resolve the progression to the mode's root and use chords, powerchords, fragments, dyads, triads... from the notes in the mode.
#4
They are not modal progressions, but ambiguous.

That's what's so nice about them.

You can in most cases use either major or minor scale over them.


Power chords are not chords, so they can never be a "true" chord progression.

Chord progression works based on tension and release with triads or tetra chords, for main harmonic movement.


If you for instance play an E power chord for an intro, you can play ANY E scale over it (a scale where the 5th is flatted (NOT an ADDED b5)) it becomes harder and not recommended.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 7, 2009,
#5
I've found that the best way to have modes in metal or rock or whatever is to make a basic riff using the notes of one chord, and then a similar riff using the notes of the other chords.

for instance, I wrote a solo riff for one of my songs that's pretty cool in E Phrygian


|------------------------------------------------------------------|
|------------------------------------------------------------------|
|------------------------------------------------------------------|
|---------------------------0--------------------------------2-----|
|---------------2---------2---2-3----------0-----3-0---0---3---3-2-|
|-0-0-0-0-3-0-0---3-0-3-0----------1-1-1-1---1-1-----1---1---------|

you better not steal it!


but this clearly defines a Em7 - F7 vamp
#6
Ok, so power chords are ambiguous. But if there's an A5-C5-B5-D5 progression, should I use A dorian/G major over it? Because with the fifths of those, it creates all the notes of G major.
#7
Quote by The4thHorsemen
but this clearly defines a Em7 - F7 vamp
That riff is arps, so yes. However, it's Fmaj7, not F7.

Quote by TheIrishPatriot
Ok, so power chords are ambiguous. But if there's an A5-C5-B5-D5 progression, should I use A dorian/G major over it? Because with the fifths of those, it creates all the notes of G major.
Where does the progression resolve? Hint: That chord may not be in the progression yet.