#1
Need to have two guitars, bass, drums, and keyboards. Suggestions?
Sig space for rent.
$100 obo
Message for negotiaton.
#2
Quote by penguin-pirate
Need to have two guitars, bass, drums, and keyboards. Suggestions?


there are literally thousands of good ones that fit that description


my top 3

Green Onions - Booker T and the MG's

Steppin' Out - John Mayall

Boogie Funk - Freddie King
Last.Fm

“If there was anything that depressed him more than his own cynicism, it was that quite often it still wasn't as cynical as real life.”
― Terry Pratchett

qft...



Jeremy Clarkson is a knob.
#6
Good question, but like Carswell says, there's thousands out there.

Two of my favourites:

Santana - Treat (although it's a piano and not a keyboard)
Chicken Shack - Horde & Cart (piano again)

Booker T & the MG's are an excellent place to start looking
#7
Quote by strawforest007
Booker T & the MG's are an excellent place to start looking



This!
#8
Chitlins Con Carne - Stevie Ray Vaughan....that was the first to come to mind.
'Music is the best"
Zappa
#9
Lenny- Stevie Ray Vaughan
"If the blues are a living thing, Charlie Patton and Robert Johnson taught it how to walk; Muddy and Howlin' Wolf taught it to run and Stevie and Eric may have made it rock but it was T-Bone Walker who made it electric."
#10
Freddie King has a lot of stuff you guys could play, and it all kicks ass.
#11
Lenny - SRV
Rememberin' Stevie - Buddy Guy
Hey Hey - Eric Clapton (a lil bit of words but could easily be played as an instrumental)

The keyboardist would love doin some Freddie King
-Guitar Boogie
-Boogie Funk
pretty much anything by this guy with Boogie in the title is great haha
#12
Quote by microtech
Freddie King has a lot of stuff you guys could play, and it all kicks ass.


Yep, not many with keyboards in but the 'Let's Hide Away and Dance Away with Freddie King' is the greatest of all blues instrumental albums that I know of (not that I know any others). I think Lennon was quoted as saying it was the basis of rock formats and paved the way, but I might have memorised that from the shame that is wikipedia. Cracking album though. Side Tracked is my favourite. In fact I'd love to hear the guys in this blues/jazz forum pulling together and attempting to cover the whole album. Would take a lot of time though!

Nice.
#13
rude mood by stevie ray vaughan.

or you can always play SRV shuffle, a glorified blues shuffle in G.
My Gear:
Guitars:
Paul Reed Smith Custom 24 in Charcoal Burst

Amps:
ENGL Powerball I V2

Pedals:
Ibanez Jemini
Vintage '70s Thomas Organ Crybaby Wah
Boss DD-6
Last edited by Junnage at Feb 16, 2009,
#14
Quote by Junnage
rude mood by stevie ray vaughan.


that is a pretty incredibly hard song to play right though
Last.Fm

“If there was anything that depressed him more than his own cynicism, it was that quite often it still wasn't as cynical as real life.”
― Terry Pratchett

qft...



Jeremy Clarkson is a knob.
#15
Scuttle Buttin' - SRV
Testify - SRV
3rd Rock from the Sun - the Jimi Hendrix Experience/SRV (I like his a bit better)
even though they aren't that "Bluesy", i would also have to say:
In Memory of Elizabeth Reed - The Allman Brothers Band
Jessica - The Allman Brothers Band
You Enjoy Myself - Phish just kidding
Quote by patriotplayer90
Lolz that guy is a noob.

Egnater
Leave it on the press, Depress Depress Taboot Taboot.
#16
well you could pretty much take any blues song and turn it into an instrumental. just ge a groove going and start playing over it. unless you mean that you want to learn the song including the solo. then in that case steppin' out with eric clapton is pretty cool. i like his versions with cream better than with the bluesbreakers. and of course hide away. i really like jeff healey's version of that one. SRV had a few instrumental jams like say what, scuttle buttin, rude mood, testify, little wing, so excited, wham, etc... albert king had some instrumental tracks too so look into him as well.

here a cool version of hide away live by jeff healey.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMuVTCDKENQ&feature=related
#17
I would suggest Alberts Shuffle, Really, Stop or His Holy Modal Majesty from the Supersession Album, Al Kooper, Mike Bloomflied and Stephen Stills.

I would also recomend Slim Jenkins Place by Booker T & the MG's

The ultimate instrumentals are on a 1966 Album East/West by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. I would suggest a listen to Work Song, to see how the instrumentalists need to spark off each other, and East/West to see the true path to greatness and realise why the chops necessary to pull it off are not for many mortals.