#1
Hey im really into all the classic rock music like led zep, cream, hendrix, jethro tull, but when ever i try to write my own songs in that style i can never do it, it allways sounds like newer music.

so if you know or write music like that please give me some suggestions.

Thanks!
#2
are you talking about the lyrics or the music? if its the lyrics check out the songwriting and lyrics technique section, if its the music aspect, try using the blues scales and work from there
#3
Seems to me, you shouldn't try too hard to write something that you can't.

Everyone has a style.
Jesus wouldn't give you the sweat off of his balls if you were dying of thirst.
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#4
Maybe not using power chords? The bands you mentioned play alot of blues-rock...try using blues scales when you write songs. On top of that get familiar with the 12 bar blues chord progression for harmony. The trick then is making a blues song sound rock.
#5
I don't have any good tips on classic really, but for songwriting in general just listen to the type of music you're trying to emulate alot. Im sure that doesnt help, because im sure you already do that. Sorry bout that.
#6
learn lots of those style songs riffs and solos.

Take your favourite classic rock riffs and mess around with them till you come up with something new. - That's what a lot of the guys you mentioned did. If was good enough for them...
Si
#7
hey thanks for the suggestions i do some of those but not all. i liked the tip making a blues song sound rock- that was good
#8
Can't play blues-rock unless you can play the blues. Find a twelve bar blues backing track on the internet, loss your girl, kill your dog, and go to jail, and then play the blues.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#9
Quote by p o e
Seems to me, you shouldn't try too hard to write something that you can't.

Everyone has a style.


Definitely don't listen to that...

What's the point of writing music if you only write what you know how to write? You have to expand your horizons to become a better musician.
#10
one thing I always bear in mind when I'm writing something "classic-rock" sounding is that you should keep it relatively simple - don't throw in a million notes for no reason. Make sure your hook is very easy to hear, i guess. the notes you don't play matter just as much as the ones you do play.

and also, i recommend just learning a ton of songs by the bands you've listed and studying how they are structured. I personally recommend Led Zeppelin if you're looking for examples of great composition on the guitar parts.
#11
I think it would help the TS for us to give an explanation of how classic rock gets its sound.

Really, most riffs are quite simple pentatonics, as mentioned before, the blues scale, and arpeggios. From what I have looked at, classic rock tends to follow the more classical rules of composition. So continue to learn your theory, start analyzing your favorite songs, and eventually learn to transcribe songs by ear(this last one helps your writing A LOT).

Also, don't set too lofty standards for yourself and be dissapointed. Skynard, Zep, Clapton, Hendrix... all the greats were truly that. Great. Their hooks were ingenous. I do bet that they worked extremely hard on them but for the most part, that is natural talent... one last piece of advice is to put a lot of work into finding one hook that can be repeated - classical rock relies on this more than many other genres.
#15
Everything Kaos said except the natural talent part, I don't believe in such a thing.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#16
I dunno. Everybody has a natural talent. Just the way that their brain works and focuses on certain things that makes it easier for them to learn.
#17
That's not natural though. I believe that past experiences have shaped us to view the world in a certain way. This shaping however, has such a small effect on ones ability to become a musician that it doesn't really matter.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#18
I guess we could go back and forth and cite thousands of nature vs nurture references but there's no point. I agree that we see this differently. I'm a psychology major going into premed and I know there there's no final answer to this argument.
Last edited by Kaos_00 at Feb 9, 2009,
#19
Fair enough.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#21
Quote by WOODY_B
any more ideas???????????????


Only use question marks in groups of 4, or 7. It's what Hendrix did.
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#22
If you're in a band, do covers, get the feel. Feel has a lot to do with it. And what the others say, no power chords, less distortion (for some), intricate basslines, etc. It's hard to emulate anothers work, but it can be done. You should let you're natural voice come out though, even if its not what you expect. Just do both, that's what I would do.
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#23
im into that style man, look make a riff, dont believe the guys who say not to use power chords combine them with minor/major chords, or if its not a riff of this style use the blues scale to make a riff, can work for the solo also, move through the scales, etc. in stuff such as the pre-chorus and the climax of the solo, make a lick and make the second guitar play the same lick but in its 4th or 5th or 8th or whatever sounds good to you, tell your drummer to not have a beat thats to square and use some pauses (in the beat and in the whole band also) if you wanna go even more in to that level, play with the theory, change tempos, compas lenghts, etc. as long as it sounds good. the thing that i cant give you an advice with are the lyrics, my bassist helps me with that issue.
#25
Quote by WOODY_B
Hey im really into all the classic rock music like led zep, cream, hendrix, jethro tull, but when ever i try to write my own songs in that style i can never do it, it allways sounds like newer music.

so if you know or write music like that please give me some suggestions.

Thanks!


Learn to play lots of classic rock songs by the bands you mentioned. If that doesn't give you a clue, not much else will.
#27
Quote by McG5-0
Buy a vintage Les Paul and a Marshall stack.



Well i'll get right on that!