#1
Lets talk about how to combine riffs in PRACTICE. There have been threads about how you should get the song to flow and focus on the whole thing rather than specific riffs, but that doesnt provide any actual practical advice, so lets focus on that side here.

It seems to me like in order to have the transition from one riff to the other to be smooth, the second riff has to start in a sort of similar way, with the same chord, as the first riff did. That way the start of the second riff will not sound unexpected or random, as the listener already experienced it(the start of it) as the first riff was repeating and it will seem like a logical progression.
#2
yeah it would work better if you're messing around only one chord progression, with dufferent riffs.
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#3
Yeah that makes sense, I remember one day I was bored and I played a whole bunch of Metallica riffs all sewn together and I would change riffs usually on an E note or E chord.

I was never really aware of that though until I read this!
#4
Are you talking about writing riffs in the same key? 'Cuz that's kinda obvious...
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#5
Honestly dude, there is no clear cut answer to this, there are an infinite amount of ways to string two riffs together. Having both riffs start on the same note is probably the easiest melodically, but overall it will make your song feel as if it has no movement.

All I can say is, go with what feels good.

And to the guy above, if you know what you are doing you can change keys between riffs just fine, and the change is often more striking than having both riffs in the same key.
Last edited by LucasGtrGod at Feb 7, 2009,
#6
Quote by LucasGtrGod
Honestly dude, there is no clear cut answer to this, there are an infinite amount of ways to string two riffs together. Having both riffs start on the same note is probably the easiest melodically, but overall it will make your song feel as if it has no movement.

All I can say is, go with what feels good.

And to the guy above, if you know what you are doing you can change keys between riffs just fine, and the change is often more striking than having both riffs in the same key.


I was referring to what the TS was talking about, not what should and shouldn't be done when writing riffs.
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#7
I assume the question is: if I have a riff from some place or song and have another riff from some other place or song, how can you use them together?

The answer is, theory. That gives you the context to analyze the riff in it's internal structure and how its functioning in the original chord context. That, in turn, leads you to a deeper understanding which in turn allows you to generalize it to any situation that you think is appropriate.

If you're only looking at superficial properties and trying to put them together in some kind of mechanical way, which is seems like the original post was trying to do, it's not going to work very well a lot of the time