#1
weird question i know.

im currently looking at computers.

i was thinking on lines of 2.5ghz processor and 2gb ram.

cubase and guitar rig 3 both say that they need 512mb ram and 1.4 ghz processor to run.

im wondering if the ghz and ram make a difference when recording because i will be recording alot of instruments at same time, maybe for a long period of time and i dont want my computer to crash because i cant have that happen during a session.

so am i right to be wanting specs that high or would 1gb ram be ok because its hard to find many computers with specs i want its either 1 or the other.

as always, any help is appreciated.
Gear:

Gibson lpj
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Les Paul 1960's Tribute Plus
Schecter s-1
Marshall JCM900 100WATT HEAD
Fender mustang 1
Dunlop Crybaby
Danelectro Distortion
Tanglewood exotic electro acoustic
Westfield Bass
#2
Don't quote me on this but I think I read somewhere that the spindle speed of the hard-disk is important as well. The higher the better.
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ESP LTD EC-1000VBL (EMG-ed)
Dean Cadillac SilverBurst Left-handed
Boss GT-8
Roland Micro-Cube
Line 6 FlexTone III XL
Levy's straps
#3
the higher the hard drive rpm the faster music recording software can access it. as said above the higher the better
Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Fernandes Ravelle Deluxe
LTD EX-400BD
LTD EC-1000
LTD V-500
Zoom 707II Pedal
Vox Satchurator Pedal
Dunlop Cry Baby Slash
Marshall MG100DFX...
#4
I don't think you need a high-end CPU, but I would reccomend a dualcore cpu, the most of those can handle anything.
for harddisks, 7200 RPM is the standard nowadays, you can take a HD with 10000 rpm, but they are expensive
#5
The specs given for cubase and guitar rig are the specs needed to run these progams. But weather you you will be able to do heavy duty recording (multitracking many tracks) all depends on the sound card. Most generic sound cards can't handle multitracking. Once you go beyond one or two tracks you will have problems.make sure the computer you choose has a really good sound card or you will have to upgrade. (SoundBlaster platinuim is the sound card I upgraded to when my generic soundcard could't cut it.) All was fine after I upgraded my sound card.
Last edited by Zimwibwe at Feb 7, 2009,
#6
in a general way, more=better. but the Ghz dont tell the whole story, theres a lot of other stuff going on that will influence the data "throughput" and performance, mad crap like bus structures and stuff. so you could have two systems that look the same, same Ghz and RAM, but one could be signifficantly faster than the other.
Last edited by TheDriller at Feb 7, 2009,
#7
Quote by Zimwibwe
The specs given for cubase and guitar rig are the specs needed to run these progams. But weather you you will be able to do heavy duty recording (multitracking many tracks) all depends on the sound card. Most generic sound cards can't handle multitracking. Once you go beyond one or two tracks you will have problems.make sure the computer you choose has a really good sound card or you will have to upgrade. (SoundBlaster platinuim is the sound card I upgraded to when my generic soundcard could't cut it.) All was fine after I upgraded my sound card.


Christ NO! dont use the onboard soundcard!!!

(or ANY "computer" soundcard )

get a USB or Firewire interface.
#8
Try using a USB or Firewire interface without a sound card and you know what you get.
NO SOUND
A USB or Firewire interface is what gets your guitar, keyboard or vocal to the sound card.
That's why it's called an interface, you still need a really good sound card
Last edited by Zimwibwe at Feb 7, 2009,
#9
Quote by Zimwibwe
Try using a USB or Firewire interface without a sound card and you know what you get.
NO SOUND
A USB or Firewire interface is what gets your guitar, keyboard or vocal to the sound card.
That's why it's called an interface, you still need a really good sound card


HA!!!!
so i guess i've had no sound for the past few years then, what with my monitors and headphones plugged into the interface.... producing absolutly no sound... just like you said.
yup... i'm a fool for not using the onboard soundcard.

what are you smokin man?... cos i gotta get some
#10
cheers for the help
if i decide to go with lower ram then ill make sure i definatly upgrade my sound card.
Gear:

Gibson lpj
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Les Paul 1960's Tribute Plus
Schecter s-1
Marshall JCM900 100WATT HEAD
Fender mustang 1
Dunlop Crybaby
Danelectro Distortion
Tanglewood exotic electro acoustic
Westfield Bass
#12
whats the difference? i know i may sound thick but im not big on computers. i know how to run one but not too good when it comes to gear or specs and that.

it was said earlier that a standard sound card couldnt handle say between 4 and 6 tracks recording at once.

i think i will be buying a alesis imultimix 8 usb mixing desk and running the instruments through that and modelling the guitar and bass through something like guitar rig because i cant have it loud cause of paper thin walls.

so will i still need a interface if im running things through the mixer into cubase?

i just want to make sure i can run 4-6 tracks at once with no problem.

and i just want to make sure that what spec i should be looking for to acomplish this cause im looking on ebay and can find a few computers like 2.5ghz and 2gb ram but more that are say 1gb ram and if that will be fine then i will get that as it be cheaper but i will fork out more money if needed cause i am hoping once i gained experience while at college i can start doing this for money.
Gear:

Gibson lpj
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Les Paul 1960's Tribute Plus
Schecter s-1
Marshall JCM900 100WATT HEAD
Fender mustang 1
Dunlop Crybaby
Danelectro Distortion
Tanglewood exotic electro acoustic
Westfield Bass
#13
an interface is a box with inputs, pre-amps and converters designed for recording, which connects to your computer by USB or Firewire. a computer soundcard however is "designed" to be as cheap as possible to manufacture. for recording, the interface is the only real choice.

get a 4-6 channel interface, and as many mics as you need, that'll allow you to record your 4-6 channels simultaniously to seperate tracks. dont bother with the mixer as it'll be redundant.

for computer specs, realistic minimum would be dual-core precessor and 2Gb RAM. the spindle speed of the harddrive is also important, go for 7200rpm.
#14
Quote by Zimwibwe
Try using a USB or Firewire interface without a sound card and you know what you get.
NO SOUND
A USB or Firewire interface is what gets your guitar, keyboard or vocal to the sound card.
That's why it's called an interface, you still need a really good sound card



You clown. That's absolute rubbish.
There is poetry in despair.
#15
Quote by Zimwibwe
Try using a USB or Firewire interface without a sound card and you know what you get.
NO SOUND
A USB or Firewire interface is what gets your guitar, keyboard or vocal to the sound card.
That's why it's called an interface, you still need a really good sound card






To even use both at the same time requires quite some jiggery pokery! In OSX it does anyway. You have to set up a bloody aggregate device.
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