#1
While watching Melodic Friedman's video, it just hit me how insane playing at that level must be - not just on a technical level, but simply thinking:

1) I'm playing so-and-so notes right now, involving knowledge of the fretboard etc.

2) I'm playing over so-and-so chord, which needs ear training and just the ability to hear whats going on

3) and then actually making interesting melodies..


It's just fucking insane. I suppose it's just a process, but to look at the end result from the beginning is really intimidating, which is something it's easy to forget when answering noob questions.

(SEGWAY)

Noob question:

When jamming, is there anyway to know which key is being played that doesn't take ages for slow thinkers? Apart from taking the chord progression, decomposing the notes, then comparing that to a scale, which confuses me sitting at home, let alone on stage.

Thanks
#2
No, there are no shortcuts.

It takes time. Don't worry about it or let it overwhelm you.

Just keep studying ..... build your house of knowledge 1 brick at a time.

You can ofcourse make great music without knowing any of that stuff.

as far as how "insane" Freidman is........it's really a matter of perspective. I think he's good, but there are literally tens of thousands of others that can do what he does and more.

Hes not insanely good, hes just an experienced musician.... and a good one.


again, don't let it overwhelm you. Just learn what you can learn and more importantly, enjoy playing your guitar.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 7, 2009,
#3
It isn't nearly as hard to get the that level as it seems. I'm 18, I've been playing for 2 or so years and I can figure out the key of a progression in about 5 seconds (as long as the chords aren't too advanced), just by finding which chord it resolves to and the number of accidentals. It is a useful skill, but in no way is it hard to acquire. All you have to do is learn your scales, your chords, and your progression theory and your there. Then you need to develop your ear so you can hear what chords are playing.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
there's no shortcuts unless you have perfect pitch and can identify stuff by ear. I usually just ask what key stuff is in, then use my knowledge of theory and how keys work to decide what to play over that key.
#5
OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
#6
Quote by allislost
OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!

Hell yeah! Mezzo piano, arpeggio, crescendo, staccato... Cantus Firmis...

It's the devil's language.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#7
Quote by gabcd86
While watching Melodic Friedman's video, it just hit me how insane playing at that level must be - not just on a technical level, but simply thinking:


Well, I'd say he's more impressive on the technical side. Playing rock, in general, isn't all that theoretically demanding compared to say, jazz. Once you start seeing some general principles, you'll see the same ones over and over again in song after song. Even jazz has similar sets of principles. Once you've generalized the structures, you don't spend much time thinking about them in order to play.

One thing to take away from that video: work on practicing arpeggios all over the neck. Even if you don't know what you're going to do with them in a solo yet, practice them every day you can. They will pay off at some point.
#8
If I need to figure out what key a song is in fast, I usually just slide up the low E string until I hear the root, usually only takes me a second or so unless the song has an unusual chord progression.
#9
Quote by allislost
OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!


Quote by SilverDark
Hell yeah! Mezzo piano, arpeggio, crescendo, staccato... Cantus Firmis...

It's the devil's language.


This forum is for helping users. Further warnings will be issued if I see anymore of this.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#10
Don't worry about the keything tho'.. I've never jammed with anybody, without knowing the key :P People usually say "Let's take some blues in A minor", or whatever you're gonna jam..

Though still.. Yea.. The whole thing is maybe a little bit far away to think about. But heck. I don't aim to be a shred-machine-uber-theory-guy.. at all. I just want to make music that reflects the lyrics, that holds the message that i wanna get out:P
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#11
Quote by gabcd86
While watching Melodic Friedman's video, it just hit me how insane playing at that level must be - not just on a technical level, but simply thinking:

1) I'm playing so-and-so notes right now, involving knowledge of the fretboard etc.

2) I'm playing over so-and-so chord, which needs ear training and just the ability to hear whats going on

3) and then actually making interesting melodies..


It's just fucking insane. I suppose it's just a process, but to look at the end result from the beginning is really intimidating, which is something it's easy to forget when answering noob questions.

(SEGWAY)

Noob question:

When jamming, is there anyway to know which key is being played that doesn't take ages for slow thinkers? Apart from taking the chord progression, decomposing the notes, then comparing that to a scale, which confuses me sitting at home, let alone on stage.

Thanks


honestly, i dont think its as hard as you make it seem. the more you think about it, the harder it seems i think. but really most songs are pretty simple. but if you want to get into more complex progressions and key changes then you just need to take it slow. one thing at a time ya know? i dont know a lot of theory, but ive picked up stuff along the way here and there and now im not lost when people talk about theory stuff. i might not know everything but i know enough to get by. and ive found that when i learn something new theory-wise, then it isnt too hard to apply it or remember it. it just makes things easier. so just take it slow and remember that these pro players have been playing for years. everyone starts somewhere.

and as for jamming, you could just ask really. no harm in that. even pro musicians ask what key something is in. that way you can just jump right in and play without figuring out the key first. usually though i just watch everyones hands to see what they are playing. that, or i just figure out the chords and i can usually figure out the key from that. i play mostly rock and blues so usually its not too hard to figure out. again, its just something that comes over time. now depending on the song i can just tell what key its in. but thats cause ive been figuring out keys for a few years now.
#12
Yeah, my problem is that I've been jamming with a funky bassist, and it's in front of an audience, so I'm already out of my comfort zone.

But yeah :P