#1
I just finished playing a little with my brother's Toys R Us guitar (hopefully the last time too; I'm checking out a Strat tomorrow)

I realized that I am a really slow guitar player, and when I speed up, my accuracy just sucks.

Although I can play some songs almost perfectly if I go really, really, really slow.

How can I improve my speed and accuracy? Are there any exercises or something?

I just feel like I suck so much when I play so slow, especially during easy songs.
When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace. - Jimi Hendrix
#2
just play alot more man
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#3
Quote by yellowsnow4free
I just finished playing a little with my brother's Toys R Us guitar (hopefully the last time too; I'm checking out a Strat tomorrow)

I realized that I am a really slow guitar player, and when I speed up, my accuracy just sucks.

Although I can play some songs almost perfectly if I go really, really, really slow.

How can I improve my speed and accuracy? Are there any exercises or something?

I just feel like I suck so much when I play so slow, especially during easy songs.

just keep playing, I know it sounds stupid and redundant, but thats what has to be done, its the only way to get better. If your trying to learn a new song keep playing it slowly, and then increase the speed slowly until it's at the speed the song goes.
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#4
Well, as long as it's not just me, I feel a little better.

I'm just dying to play some Hendrix
When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace. - Jimi Hendrix
#5
Practice.

Also, if you use Guitar Pro/Tuxguitar etc, you can slow it down, then just play along slowly and build up speed gradually.
Last edited by littlephil at Feb 8, 2009,
#6
Remember when playing to try and push yourself and play faster just for a little while and then back off it really helped me when learning to play fast stuff
#7
Practice, practice, practice. Speed will come with time, but accuracy comes with practicing with that time right.
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#8
"Hey, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?"

"Practice, practice, practice!"

Seriously, though, if you want to work on speed, work on accuracy first.

Robert Fripp said it best in his foreword to The Guitar Handbook revised edition from 1992: "We begin with the possible and gradually move towards the impossible..."

Get yourself a good metronome that you can incrementally increase the tempo on until you are accurate at ungodly speeds.
#9
this problem is nothing that practicing for many hours a day for the next few years won't solve

Just keep crackin at 'er
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#10
theres um this 21 day challenge thing in the guitar and bass basics forum. basically learn whatever it is youre learning note by note. then day by day increase the bpm. by the time youve done it. your accuracy and speed should improve.
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#11
Usually for me speed comes wiht repetition the more I play a riff the faster I can play it I never really push speed on myself cause when I do my accuarcy is horrible.
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#12
Slow down. A LOT. Grab a metronome and play mind-numbingly slowly, and work your way up. Make sure that you have control and accuracy at all times. It's useless if you don't.
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#14
Find the speed in which your most comfortable.
Then gradually push the envelope.
Basicly get to the point where you begin to be sloppy and play there untill you rid of the sloppyness.
After time youlle notice a big change.

But it takes time.
#15
SPEED IS A BYPRODUCT OF ACCURACY!

buy a metronome and start slowly, play it perfectly 12 times (12 times is the amount of time it takes for the average person to commit something to muscle memory), and keep raising the metronome until you struggle, lower it a little and work on it.

rinse and repeat.
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#16
we've all bin through it man.

A method I've used that's helped me a lot is using a metronome/drum machine and playing the same thing again and again at a very low tempo, then slowly increasing the tempo. Also if, you find accuracy tough at a certain tempo, then play for a while at a much higher tempo trying your hardest to get the accuracy on, and when you come back down to the original tempo, you'll find it much easier.

That's my advice, it's what a lot of people do and it works more often than not.
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#17
Quote by aradine
SPEED IS A BYPRODUCT OF ACCURACY!

buy a metronome and start slowly, play it perfectly 12 times (12 times is the amount of time it takes for the average person to commit something to muscle memory), and keep raising the metronome until you struggle, lower it a little and work on it.

rinse and repeat.

This is a more instructional form of what said.

Remember TS to not just play with a metronome but to push your limits slightly.
If you never try and go faster than currently then you will never become faster/

Don't worry about speed as much as accuracy at a set speed.

Quote by goonerbynature
A method I've used that's helped me a lot is using a metronome/drum machine and playing the same thing again and again at a very low tempo, then slowly increasing the tempo. Also if, you find accuracy tough at a certain tempo, then play for a while at a much higher tempo trying your hardest to get the accuracy on, and when you come back down to the original tempo, you'll find it much easier.

A perfect example of pushing the limit.
Although this approach isn;t perfect.
Last edited by [[BurnTheDusk]] at Feb 8, 2009,