#2
It's an attempt to understand music on a theoretical level.

The body of observations regarding what makes music "work".
Si
#3
The same idea as scientific theory, it's the rules that explain the physical phenomenon we experience, e.g. what notes sound pleasing to the ear when played together and why

and equally what notes don't
#4
joe satriani

Quote by tastes_of_ink
The same idea as scientific theory, it's the rules that explain the physical phenomenon we experience, e.g. what notes sound pleasing to the ear when played together and why

and equally what notes don't


basically this, if you want to get into theory, start off with scales, modes, intervals, chords, etc...
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#5
its the theory of how music works and its actualy not on a theoretical level like the other dude said its actually on a scientific mathematical level and they call many things in science " The Theory of Blah Blah" because it can potentially change although sometimes probably wont and if they couldnt change they would be "laws" so saying it is on a theoretical level is like saying its not completely sure yet but since music is completely sure of its intervals and such it is not so theoretical after all =)
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#6
musical structure etc really understanding the music you play ie how its put together, concepts , appogiaturas acciacaturas etc
#7
Quote by tastes_of_ink
The same idea as scientific theory, it's the rules principles that explain the physical phenomenon we experience, e.g. what notes sound pleasing to the ear when played together and why

and equally what notes don't
I hate to be pedantic but please don't confuse music theory with "rules".
Si
#8
Look at it this way...

You could just sit there and hit everything single note until you find one you like and then do the same thing all over again until you find the note that goes next etc.

Or you could look and go ok, well this is such and such so if i use this note next it'll add this feel to the music and that information is derived (sp?) from music theory, or the proven characteristic's of certain notes/ sounds and how they can be used together to form music.

Im not good at explaining to be honest, but that is what i try to think of music theory as, it's not "do this, this and this and you get music" i've tried running over a scale and it just sounds, well boring to be honest, it's really well if your doing this, this might sound good or this is proven to sound nice/ work with this and then you could go well, i'll use this, but i'll tweak this and that to get a unique sound.

Yea, im going to end this post now.
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#9
A hard to understand ****load of concepts that takes the most disciplined genius musicians to master which is why I can't do it
#10
Anyone can do it, it just take's practice and some research, we have access to so much more information than some of the music genius (im talking back in the 17th century etc), it might take years, but it isnt impossible.
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#11
music theory is a collection of terms that universally describe what we hear in music.
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#12
it's a few things:

1. It's a subject that is frequently mis-taught, because many teachers presuppose too much knowledge when they begin teaching a student. They always start with scales instead of intervals.

2. It's an analysis of what music has sounded like throughout history, and what sounds people prefer over other sounds.

3. It is the explanation of why what sounds good, actually sounds good.

4. It is a collection of terms that describe distinct sounds, melodies and harmonies that people recognize and place importance on in music.

Think of it this way. We all know some chords, whether we know theory or not. let's use a C major chord as an example, since it's the first chord most people learn.

if you don't know theory, all you know is what frets and what strings you go to in order to make what is known as a "C." if you did not have a tab, or prior knowledge of the piece you are playing, you would not be able to make an accurate prediction of what chords might sound good along with the C, nor would you be able to predict the effect of altering any or all of the notes in your chord.

if you know theory, you know why the notes in each chord sound good, and you know what will happen if you alter any of them in any given way. you eliminate tedious guesswork when choosing chords for your progressions, because you will know that all keys function the same way, and going to ____ chord in relation to ____ chord will always sound a certain way.
#13
its the theory of how music works and its actualy not on a theoretical level like the other dude said its actually on a scientific mathematical level and they call many things in science " The Theory of Blah Blah" because it can potentially change although sometimes probably wont and if they couldnt change they would be "laws" so saying it is on a theoretical level is like saying its not completely sure yet but since music is completely sure of its intervals and such it is not so theoretical after all =)


You don't seem to understand what the terms "theory" and "law" mean in science.
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