#1
Locally, the only 4 people who aren't already in a band that have the time, talent and interest to make one are me (a bass player who plays some guitar), a cellist who can RIP, a pretty solid drummer and a great female singer. All 3 are friends of mine.

How do you all think this haphazard mix of musicians would turn out? Ideally, Muse or Radiohead would be a good example of the type of sound I'd like to achieve, but I'd be happy with anything that sounds good.
#2
Sounds both different and awesome. Go for it.
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#3
I think it'd be amazing. Just make sure the cellist doesn't play too low. Otherwise, it'll be way too muddy.
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#4
Both you can the cello can alternate playing higher in the register. And just because you can't find a guitarist now, you may be able to find one further down the road if you find you need one..so give it a shot. I'm sure you could create some good sounds.
#5
do it. if you work hard you could make it sound really beautiful
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#6
id say play primarily guitar, have the cellist handle the lower register--on some songs when they want more leads (higher register passages) switch to bass. it could sound amazing if done well.
#7
Quote by tehREALcaptain
id say play primarily guitar, have the cellist handle the lower register--on some songs when they want more leads (higher register passages) switch to bass. it could sound amazing if done well.

This is what I was going to suggest.

This sounds like a really cool thing. A cellist instead of a bassist would give a really unique sound.

Check out Apocolyptica(sp?) for cello as the primary focus of a band. They're pretty nifty.
#8
^ dammit i was gonna suggest they check out that band

tis like a metal cello band
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#9
Quote by tehREALcaptain
id say play primarily guitar, have the cellist handle the lower register--on some songs when they want more leads (higher register passages) switch to bass. it could sound amazing if done well.


The problem I have with cellos holding the bottom end is that the lowest open string on a Cello is the C 2 octaves below middle C, aka the lowest C on a bass. Meaning we're missing at minimum about a minor 6th worth of crunchy lowness. I'm not to big a fan of string quartets/quintets unless they got a double bass player, I love my bottom end. :P

However a cello has a surprisingly high register, I think cello players can comfortably get to the C two octaves above middle C, or the 20th fret of your high E string on a guitar. It's bomb, I needn't worry about filling the higher regester.

Plus I suck at (and hate playing) guitar beyond chording. Though I'm sure I'd end up playing it for certain songs that don't have a prominent bass line.

And yea, Apocalyptica fu*king rocks.
#10
so then chord, and let the cellist handle the melody?
EDIT: the main issue i see with cellos is they cant play chords. Like, you guys could get three notes going at a time, but you'd have to carefully go over voicings to make sure evrything pans out harmonically if you played bass where as when you play guitar, you can focus on the lower register, and let the cello handle bass duties when theres a vocal melody, and when there the cellist can pick up the melody. And you may miss that minor sixth of bassiness, but i would miss defined harmony much more.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Feb 9, 2009,
#11
Quote by tehREALcaptain
so then chord, and let the cellist handle the melody?
EDIT: the main issue i see with cellos is they cant play chords. Like, you guys could get three notes going at a time, but you'd have to carefully go over voicings to make sure evrything pans out harmonically if you played bass where as when you play guitar, you can focus on the lower register, and let the cello handle bass duties when theres a vocal melody, and when there the cellist can pick up the melody. And you may miss that minor sixth of bassiness, but i would miss defined harmony much more.


4 or 5 if I play chords on my bass, 6 if you count the vocal line, but yea, I know what you're saying, certain songs will be difficult. Though the problem with letting the cello handle bass duties is that it's just not a bass. Its pretty much a 7 stringed guitar in terms of range.

I may, however, be buying an 8 or 10 stringed bass soon (with the strings in octave pairs like a 12 string guitar), which would probably solve the shortage-on-voicings problem.
#12
Thats a really unique/awesome combo, in my opinion. It cold absolutely work, obviously covers would be fairly difficult, however, the originals would sound completely... original!

Even better, if one of the members (besides the drummer) took up some part-time keyboards, I think that would be solid.
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#13
Quote by bluesrocker101
Thats a really unique/awesome combo, in my opinion. It cold absolutely work, obviously covers would be fairly difficult, however, the originals would sound completely... original!

Even better, if one of the members (besides the drummer) took up some part-time keyboards, I think that would be solid.


Haha I wish one of us played keyboards, that'd be perfect.

Yea, I've pretty much been flipping through my music library looking for songs that would sound decent with a cello replacing the piano or guitar.

Is there any way to turn an acoustic cello into an electric one? Something one could use distortion with?
#14
Try picking up an acoustic guitar pickup. These use piezo magnets, which translates the vibrations of the wood and sound into an amplify-able sound. You'd probably want to use a keyboard or bass amp for that, though.
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#16
I have no idea. Look around on musiciansfriend, sweetwater, and guitar center may even carry some.
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#17
So would you be the guitar player? If not where do you fit into this whole equation?
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#18
Quote by tehREALcaptain
id say play primarily guitar, have the cellist handle the lower register--on some songs when they want more leads (higher register passages) switch to bass. it could sound amazing if done well.

thats what im thinking as well. ive heard some jams with just guitar, percussion and cello and it sounded pretty sweet.
#19
Quote by Jango22
Try picking up an acoustic guitar pickup. These use piezo magnets, which translates the vibrations of the wood and sound into an amplify-able sound. You'd probably want to use a keyboard or bass amp for that, though.


There's probably cello pickups out there too... An acoustic guitar pickup won't fit in a cello well. I know there are double bass pickups so cello ones would be similar only smaller.
#20
Quote by Led man32
So would you be the guitar player? If not where do you fit into this whole equation?


Electric bass.
#21
i've been thinking about doing something like this too... but im not rich enough to afford a cello
& there ARE cello pickups, no idea how much they are, but Apocalyptica attach them under the bridge of their cellos & yeah!
you should definately do this, it'd be awesome & experimental!
#22
Fuck you...

You made me fuckin' jealous...

that'd be so DAMN AWSOME!
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Last edited by linus.d at Mar 1, 2009,
#23
personally i think cello makes thing sound great when harmonising and such but if you want any reference for how it might sound check Nirvana's Unplugged dvd or Metallica's S&M for howit might sound
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#24
Seeing as how cello is essentialy a bass instrument, and seeing as how you already play guitar, maybe it's worth sticking to the guitar rather than bass, or maybe play lead bass with a trebly sound and chords or even an 8 string bass.

And yeah, they make electric cellos.....



.....so someone must make pickups for them.
#25
Quote by isaac_bandits
There's probably cello pickups out there too... An acoustic guitar pickup won't fit in a cello well. I know there are double bass pickups so cello ones would be similar only smaller.


You can put piezo pickups on the outside of the instrument as well...it just won't look as neat.

Of course, there's always the choice of micing the cello, as well. I don't think the cellist will be running around the stage too much.
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#26
That electric looks like my electric violin.

Anyway, there would obviously be a strong ass bass end. I do know that both bass and cello get pretty high notes, though. Cello has more range, IIRC. It's teh same as a violin, which as I remember has a 5 octave range (Root G, G on D string, G on A string, 2 G's on high E, assuming certain position work)

Also, I would definitely agree here and say get a pickup. Most are pretty cheap, but they function just fine. Also, I believe and acoustic amp would work better for you. I'm no expert, but it strikes me that distortion and acoustic cello are a poor marriage.
#27
Quote by Guitartist
You can put piezo pickups on the outside of the instrument as well...it just won't look as neat.

Of course, there's always the choice of micing the cello, as well. I don't think the cellist will be running around the stage too much.



Don't say so; check out apocalyptica live
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#28
Quote by Geldin
That electric looks like my electric violin.

Anyway, there would obviously be a strong ass bass end. I do know that both bass and cello get pretty high notes, though. Cello has more range, IIRC. It's teh same as a violin, which as I remember has a 5 octave range (Root G, G on D string, G on A string, 2 G's on high E, assuming certain position work)

There's no G on the A string (unless you shift up, but then you would be playing one of the G's on the E string) so the violin has about 3 octaves (there are four G's but that makes three octaves) and a third/half. Cello id probably quite similar to this, though they might be able to get a bit higher (comparitively).

A cellist could easily play high enough (mind you, even double basses can get suprisingly high) to play some sort of accompaniment to the vocal while you handle the low end on bass.
#29
Definitely go for it man. I'm in a band that's close to the same setup, except swapping the fem vox for a male vox/guitarist. If you want to check us out the link's in my sig. It may give you a different example of how the cello can be implemented (keep in mind these are rough demos... we're planning to hit the 'studio' again soon)

Someone in the band should be able to transcribe songs into standard notation for the cellist, as at times that might be necessary. Getting a bass amp for the cellist isn't a bad idea either, since that's what we did and it works fine. A preamp would be helpful too.
#30
great idea, but i think you should try to keep it all minimalistic in some parts, like for instance, the novelty of your band is most likely going to be the cello, but try not to overdo it by having it play constantly in all of your songs, make sure everything's kept in balance.

But great idea.
#31
If you were considering the cello play the bass role, nothing says you can't detune a cello...it's a little different, but not unheard of, its just not done usually because most cellos are used in a orchestra, and orchestra's don't have time to change tunings. However, you wouldn't be able to detune it to a bass level, probably just a few semitones.

But then again, you could play bass and have the cello play the higher register. Both would work equally well, I think. It usually sounds pretty good if you have a good cellist.

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#32
This would be awesome. I don't think you'd have to switch to guitar at all...either instrument can handle bass duties just fine, while the other does melody. You don't have to play low at all to do bass duties...check out some videos of guys playing piccolo basses.

As the bassist specifically, you might want to invest in a six string, and maybe some good effects to expand tour tonal palette. A fuzzed-out bass with acoustic instruments sounds awesome. (Look at Demon Hunter's the tide began to rise for an example. 1:55 is a good place to skip to.)
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Last edited by Mutant Corn at Mar 4, 2009,
#33
let the bass player handle the typical bass stuff. cello can play lead if they are good enough (i have been playing cello for 15 years btw)

does the cellist have a pickup? and do you guys have a PA system?
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