#1
what is a good way to practice this?


just going in 3rds and creating major chords?\


ANY suggestions are appreciated


THANKS!
Quote by King Twili
It's just me and Doris here ;_;



Quote by Zaphikh
Poops is the chat MC - but here we know him as Early Cuyler.


Free Downloads, Yo!
#3
not just major thirds, diatonic chords...make sure they fit with the key you're in.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
Oh! My band has a song that does this twice.

The first time we stagger the entrances, lowest to highest, and it creates a chord progression when we change each note. The second time it's a chord progression, but with different lyrics. We're all choir kids, so we approached as kind of a choral arrangement for Bass, bass/baritone, and tenor.

If you know any music theory/composition, write out your melody line and harmonize it with 2 additional voices.


I'd be glad to give more info if you have question. I have to poop right now though.
#5
From my experience, the best way to practice this is to listen to bands that you know and like that do 3-part vocal harmonies and try to copy them. I hate reading notes and I don't aspire to learn how. I'm completely self-taught and satisfied with learning from the musicians I love to listen to.

I suggest you do the same.

To start you off, try the Beatles or The Mamas And The Papas.
Last edited by alex0203 at Feb 10, 2009,
#6
I'll add to Alex's post and say also listen to Everly Brothers and Crosby, Stills, and Nash.
I have a Joe Walsh dvd and he talks about the third part harmony.
Quote by SteveHouse
This thread is officially about sucking Sleaze off for a sig.


Quote by tayroar
Hey Sleaze I'll give you a blowjob if you sig me. Maybe even some nudey photos?


Quote by crazy8rgood


Sleaze, that made me lulz in my pants.


Quote by 36mikeyb36
hahaha Sleaze i'd give you my mom for that one.
#7
Quote by alex0203
From my experience, the best way to practice this is to listen to bands that you know and like that do 3-part vocal harmonies and try to copy them. I hate reading notes and I don't aspire to learn how. I'm completely self-taught and satisfied with learning from the musicians I love to listen to.

I suggest you do the same.

To start you off, try the Beatles or The Mamas And The Papas.



That's a little ambitous, listening to them then trying to do complex harmonizing for the first time is just going to make you feel like a faliure Granted everyone should still listen to them.

I like alternative rock, so I listen pretty often to the vocal harmonies in the Barenaked ladies and Cake, there are some really good harmonies hidden in there, a whole lot of the songs for both bands have two part, but three part stuff slips in there fairly often enough too. Oh and REM. All these bands are subtle wtith harmony, but have lots of songs where the second and third voice go beyond typical "backup singer" style.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Feb 10, 2009,
#8
Listen to Nowhere Man By the Beatles, it is a great example.
Last edited by due 07 at Feb 10, 2009,
#9
If you want all three singers to do a major chord you would not want the highest singer (assuming that the harmony is just stacked above the melody line) to do a major third above the second singer. That would create an augmented chord and probably not sound very good.

I would suggest figuring out the chord progression you're playing first. Then work on doing the harmony. The second singer should sing either a major or minor third above the melody. The highest singer (again, assuming that you're just going to stack the other two singers above the melody) should always sing the 5th. If you want to sing a major chord the middle singer should sing a major 3rd interval above the melody, a minor is a minor 3rd interval.

If you need more just ask. I don't know how much sense I made.
#10
The Beatle's song "Because" is a perfect example of 3 part vocal harmony.

Also, some theory might help you learn how to form the right intervals, so that you don't end up with any diminished chords or anything.
My guitar modification blog.
Quote by MuffinMan
Jesus was all like "To those about to rock, I salute you." then he grabbed his mighty axe and rocked the Romans out really hard. Of course they were strict classical music so....
#11
my band just has two more people plus me sing we harmonize pretty well just doing that
#13
hmm, making constant major chords (traids)

you know right, that a major scale is made up of both major AND MINOR chords. (oh, and a diminished, i think)

theres a pattern. something like; major, major, minor, major, major, minor dinimished major.

i know thats not the extact pattern, and now i feel ****, *goes to do more throry practice*

hope i helped. just letting you know, doing all major chords, wont work.
#14
we do 3 part harmonies in my band

and what we tend to do is

try it acapella.

Basically, what we do is, we get the singer and the play the first chord of the section you want to harmonize so she has the melody. Then either me or the other guitarist will sing a harmony till we are satisfied with it and record it on our phone.

Then we will try and add the third harmony and see if it fits or if it sounds too full. The best way we found was to play the singers melody on guitar, and then the other guitarist play a harmony over the top and then sing it.

It sounds a lot harder than it is.