#1
Hello fellow UGers,
First off let me say that this is a very broad question/issue so I don't really expect the correct answer... on this subject, I believe everyones different. I would, however, like to hear how you deal with the issue so I can get a feel for the way people approach things.

Generally when I write, its music than lyrics because thats more natural to me. But I wrote these lyrics to a song, and now I want to play what I hear in my head. After about a day of trying this, I still can't find the chord progression I'm looking for. I'm more of a lead player, so this is very frustrating.

So I guess the question is: how do you get the music out of your head and onto the guitar?
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#3
Quote by z4twenny
^ theory helps alot


I've got some good aural training under my belt as far as intervals are concerned, and I'm into theory, b ut applications on this subject is evading me. Any particular theory?
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#4
Some people just aren't good at putting music to words. I personally can generally only do it the other way round. However, if you can hear it in your head, then strum chords until you find the one that opens it in your head. Then, see where the chord wants to go next and compare the end result to what you have in your head.
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thanks for the compliment man!
#5
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Some people just aren't good at putting music to words. I personally can generally only do it the other way round. However, if you can hear it in your head, then strum chords until you find the one that opens it in your head. Then, see where the chord wants to go next and compare the end result to what you have in your head.


thanks for all the good input guys, I guess its trial and error!!!
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#6
^ well trial and error yes, but no at the same time. if you can identify a F# major and know what that sounds like and how it sounds different from a F#7 then THATS good aural skills. if you can hear something in your head and play it directly with minimal or no guessing then thats good aural skills. it sounds like you might want to keep at that aspect of it as it appears to be what is frustrating you.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
^ well trial and error yes, but no at the same time. if you can identify a F# major and know what that sounds like and how it sounds different from a F#7 then THATS good aural skills. if you can hear something in your head and play it directly with minimal or no guessing then thats good aural skills. it sounds like you might want to keep at that aspect of it as it appears to be what is frustrating you.


I guess that settles it, I need to expand my aural training to chords and notes and not just intervals. Thanks again man I appreciate the input.
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#8
Can you sing it how it sounds in your head?

then you need to slow down and meditate on it for a while. Slow it down and play it note for note in your head. what is the opening note just focus on it and extend it out think about it then try to find it by singing or on your instrument. Work your way through note by note.

Then when you have the vocal melody harmonize what you're hearing in your head. Note where the changes are. Work out each harmony note by note if you have to the same way you did the main melody.
Si
#9
Quote by gizmodious
Hello fellow UGers,
First off let me say that this is a very broad question/issue so I don't really expect the correct answer... on this subject, I believe everyones different. I would, however, like to hear how you deal with the issue so I can get a feel for the way people approach things.

Generally when I write, its music than lyrics because thats more natural to me. But I wrote these lyrics to a song, and now I want to play what I hear in my head. After about a day of trying this, I still can't find the chord progression I'm looking for. I'm more of a lead player, so this is very frustrating.

So I guess the question is: how do you get the music out of your head and onto the guitar?


You know it took Leonard Cohen years to write 'Hallelujah'?

That is not a typo.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

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#10
For the most part I write the music and the lyrics at the first time, or the music first. Sometimes i'll write lyrics first, but I never like them out of context with the music.

That said, I just am finishing a song with lyrics I wrote in school with an entirely different musical style that I had envisioned. As cliche as it sounds, I just let it come to me. I'll play the chord progression and I let the vocal melody just come out. After I have a basis, then I consciously work on it. But I never start with a vocal melody it seems, that just isn't my style I guess.
#11
Quote by Damascus
You know it took Leonard Cohen years to write 'Hallelujah'?

That is not a typo.
I think I read in a Led Zep biography that Jimmy Page was working on parts of Stairwary to Heaven for over a year before it all came together. Then Robert Plant wrote the lyrics in like 20 minutes or something.
Si