#1
I'd say that I'm an intermediate guitarist. I spent 4 years learning how to play the acoustic guitar. In the process of this, I learnt all of the basic chords and techniques. As well as this, I learnt how to read basic music. I then went on to learn how to play the electric guitar, which I found a lot more intriguing than learning how to play the acoustic guitar. Was the time spent learning how to the play the acoustic guitar a good learning curve, or was it just a waste of time?
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Last edited by HD 215 at Feb 9, 2009,
#2
There's no difference - the stuff you learned on acoustic is equally applicable to electric guitar.
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#3
that's a ridiculously stupid question.

you're learning the guitar, there's no difference between electric and acoustic when it comes to playing.
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#4
I didn't mean it like that. I was young, and I had an elderly guitar tutor. I was uneducated, and I felt that I only had the basics avaliable to me. Was it a waste of time going through the basics for 4 years? I'm only asking this because I feel that my current guitar tutor gives me a lot more options and a better quality of tutoring when it comes to learning how to play the electric guitar, compared to my former guitar tutor when it came to learning how to play the acoustic guitar.
When one sees a lion, one must get into the car.
Last edited by HD 215 at Feb 9, 2009,
#5
1 year or 10 years, however long it takes for you to learn is how long it takes to learn...
#6
Acoustic guitar is almost exclusively classical, which makes teachers sort of linear with how they teach. With electric, especially if you KNOW how to play yourself, you end up being your best teacher from learning songs off of tabs to experimenting to self teaching out of technique books driven for a certain style.

Also you may just have a hell load better teacher for electric. What is probably causing yout o be more intrigued with electric is...well...its' electric. You can play LOUD, you can play with or without distortion, you can tweak small things on your amp knobs for tone, on your own guitar, etc. There is more options to play with on electric, causing you to be immersed and interrested with it.
#7
Was the time spent learning how to the play the acoustic guitar a good learning curve, or was it just a waste of time? In other words, would I be at the same level that I'm at now, without having previously learnt how to play the acoustic guitar?
When one sees a lion, one must get into the car.
Last edited by HD 215 at Feb 9, 2009,
#8
Hell no, you would've been doing the basics if you hadn't played acoustic. I played acoustic exclusively for three years and my style hardly changed with electric. Sure I turned to more grunge music with distortion at my finger tips and my funk improved with a wah pedal and nice sensitive pickups, but acoustic = electric in all senses. The electric overall is just more versatile due to all the junk we've made for it
#9
Quote by manhangi
Acoustic guitar is almost exclusively classical, which makes teachers sort of linear with how they teach. With electric, especially if you KNOW how to play yourself, you end up being your best teacher from learning songs off of tabs to experimenting to self teaching out of technique books driven for a certain style.

Also you may just have a hell load better teacher for electric. What is probably causing yout o be more intrigued with electric is...well...its' electric. You can play LOUD, you can play with or without distortion, you can tweak small things on your amp knobs for tone, on your own guitar, etc. There is more options to play with on electric, causing you to be immersed and interrested with it.

Sorry, but you're talking out of your arse there.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#10
It is in my area...when I first graduated from my basics book I looked for someone that could teach me acoustic blues...didn't work out so well.
#11
Many people used to believe it was better to learn on accoustic first and a lot of us older guys started that way. It's harder the fret the notes so finger strength and callouses develop more. Many people can't play an accoustic because of this. Sloppy technique also stands out more on an accoustic as there's nothing to hide behind. So no, the time wasn't wasted.
Moving on.....
#12
Thank you all for taking the time to answer my query.
When one sees a lion, one must get into the car.
Last edited by HD 215 at Feb 10, 2009,
#13
Quote by manhangi
It is in my area...when I first graduated from my basics book I looked for someone that could teach me acoustic blues...didn't work out so well.

I dont understand... they couldnt just teach you blues and you could play it on an acoustic guitar? a guitar is a guitar... all the techniques and styles are the same to me.

it only matters how you want to sound.