#1
Hey guys, i'm kinda new here... really i just wanted to get some info on acoustic tapping... a friend of mine showed me a recording of andy mckee, and since then i've been just fascinated by acoustic tapping...i've been looking at other musicians that use this technique, like erik mongrain for example...so does anyone know if this is something i can learn from pretty much any guitar teacher, or do i need to find someone who teaches this technique specifically? like i said i don't know much about this, in fact i've never taken any guitar lessons, just kinda taught myself. i appreciate your help.
#3
I taught myself how to do it. I learned drifting as my first song and after that it's relatively easy to progress to other songs. I mostly tap on a classical because I love the way it sounds. Just play any guitar you want and have fun. Watch how Andy Mckee does it on youtube and copy him.

Have fun
#5
Quote by Aramoni
can this acoustic tapping be done with nylon strings?


Yeah, it can be done on classical. In fact, it's probably best to first practice with a classical if possible as there is a lot less string tension than on a steel string guitar. There's actually a piece I transcribed for a six-string guitar that is 99% two-handed tapping, and I play it because it visually exciting and great left hand warmup. By the time I'm done, my left forearm is pumped and aching like hell.
#6
haha thanks guys this was all helpful, but i've tried teaching myself, in my experience with other instruments i tend to learn faster and better if i get hands on advice from someone that knows what they're doing...so back to my original question...can i learn this from pretty much any teacher, or is this a specialty thing? thanks
#7
well, you can learn most techniques from a regular teacher, but the percussive stuff you most likely will need to learn on your own. If you have a fairly good handle on fingerstyle already, then just bite the bullet, tune your guitar to DADGAD, and just keep playing Andy McKee's "drifting" until you get the hang of it.
#9
Quote by Bushinarin
Anyone have tips on how to slap harmonics?

Like in Phunkdified? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xon04MB1rDw

At :15 seconds. I can never get quite a similar sound.


Likely not. I'm not saying you're slapping the harmonics wrong, though it does just take practice, but it will sound different on different guitars. My guitar especially is really insensitive to harmonics. I think the guitar's action is a big factor too, I find I get the nicest harmonic slap sound when my action is a bit higher, problem is, I hate high action, and I'm willing to sacrifice a better slapping sound. Also, he's Justin King, and you're you.

Think of it more as a whipping action than an actual slap. You slap down and then stop your fingers dead after hitting, or something like that. You want a quick sharp attack on the strings. Also, don't hit the entire length of the fretboard (i.e., all six strings). You're mainly aiming for the first 3 or 4 strings.
#10
Quote by ReChord
well, you can learn most techniques from a regular teacher, but the percussive stuff you most likely will need to learn on your own. If you have a fairly good handle on fingerstyle already, then just bite the bullet, tune your guitar to DADGAD, and just keep playing Andy McKee's "drifting" until you get the hang of it.


hm see my problem is that i've never taken a guitar lesson in my life, all i know i've been able to transfer from instruments i know and have been trained at (cello, bass). so learning fingerstyle will help?
#11
Yes, learning fingerstyle will help immensely. Infact, the stuff they do IS fingerpicking, just with some other stuff added in, not the other way around. Start learning stuff like "Dust in the Wind" or Eric Clapton's "Hey Hey." Once you are comfortable with the core technique they use ( finger picking) then you can learn some of the secondary techniques such as tapping, slap harmonics, and percussive hits on the guitar.