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#1
Each of the different varieties of wood used to build guitar bodies and necks has its own sonic signature, and even different cuts of the same type of wood can produce different sounding guitars, depending on how long they have been aged and dried, how dense they are, and so on.

Ash-Broad distinctive grain that looks good under translucent finishes and is used exclusively for guitar bodies, not necks. Produces blend of twangy, airy and sweet tones, with solid lows and pleasing highs. The classic wood of 1950s Fender Guitars.

Swamp Ash- Pretty much same sound as regular ash. It is more desirable because of it being lightweight.

Alder-Slightly brownish hue in its natural state, and finer grain than ash. Just used for bodies. Used in 1960s Fender Guitars, particularly ones with opaque custom colors. Alders voice is strong, clear, and full bodied with beefy lower mids, excellent lows, and silky, smooth highs.

Maple-Dense, hard heavy wood that elicits a bright sound with lots of definition in the note. Used in both bodies and necks. In guitar bodies, Maple is usually partnered with a second, lighter wood like Mahogany. this helps to lighten the load and round out the tone. Maple can be potentially harsher and give more cut and snap to the sound of pure Mahogany. When used in a guitars neck, Maple helps to add clarity and immediacy to a guitars tone(like the fender 'twang').

Mahogany-classic Gibson body wood, and also is used in majority of Gibsons' necks. Used on its own, Mahoganys' voice is warm and somewhat soft, but well-balanced and full bodied with decent bite. Mahogany is used on its own in the bodies and necks of Gibsons' such as the SG and Les Paul Junior and Special, and paired with a maple cap in the Les Paul and in plenty set-neck guitars from makers such as Gretsch, Paul Reed Smith, Dean and Hamer. When used as the primary wood in a guitars neck, Mahogany tends to make the instrument sound rounder and warmer verses maples brightness and clarity.

Basswood-Used exclusively for bodies, has come into favor more recently. This abundant, affordable wood is particularly used in budget and mid-level guitars, where it is often used in place of ash or alder. This is actually a good tonewood by any standard and doesn't deserve a 'cheap' label. Basswoods voice is fat but well balanced, with a muscular midrange and good dynamics.

Korina-Lesser seen timber than others, but is used in the Gibson flying V and Explorer, it has also been used quite extensively by Hamer, and companies that copy the classic Gibson designs. It has properties similar to mahogany but is lighter in color and very often in weight as well. As a tonewood it yields a little more clarity and definition than mahogany, and is used for both bodies and necks.

Rosewood-Attractive, red-brown to dark-chocolate colored wood, and is one of the most popular timbers for fingerboards. When a maple neck is topped with a rosewood fingerboard, this darker wood helps it to become a little sweeter and warmer, with more sparkle in the highs and a thickness to the lows. A mahogany rosewood mix tends to exhibit complex highs, thick lows, and a round appealing mid-range. Rosewood is also used in guitar bodies on occasion, more often as one of the many elements in 'custom' styled guitars that sandwich together many exotic woods, although Fender did release a rare and usually heavy Rosewood Telecaster in the late 1960s, played by George Harrison of The Beatles.

Ebony-The fingerboard timber of many deluxe, high-end guitars. It's dark color may tell you it has a dark sound. It is a very dense, hard wood and its tonal properties are closer to those of maple than mahogany. An ebony fingerboard tends to increase the snap, definition, and immediacy of a neck made from mahogany.

Even the paint you apply to the wood of a guitar can have an effect on its sound. Most great early models of electric guitars were finished with a thin cote of nitrocellulose(lacquer), which allows wood to breathe and resonate, but thins out and cracks over time. In the 1970s some manufacturers moved over to polyurethane or polyester, both of which are more thicker and durable, but can choke and tighten a guitars sound, which is why most high-end manufacturers have returned to nitrocellulose.


These are a bunch by Rebelw/Outacord

Cherry- hard, dense, stable, finishes well, and has a reddish brown coloration that can have various different shades of tint. tone is rich in midrange and high-end sound, and draws a variety of comparisons to everything from mahogany to maple. expensive due to demand for its use in furniture but easy to find in all sizes as a result

Mesquite- a southwestern American wood. not always easy to find in some regions, but very, very hard and makes a solid fretboard or neck, due to its high stability and resistance to warping. This wood has a dull brownish color that can finish to a deep reddish brown. Sound is clear, similar to walnut, but with less upper midrange character.


Walnut - a darker brown American hardwood. good choice for both necks and bodies. bright sounding, similar to maple but with a slightly less extreme top end. It's heavy and dense, which explains the bright sound but can also be hard on the shoulder. one of the more expensive domestic hardwoods, but is readily available.
Black walnut grows throughout the country and is the less expensive version. It is tonally identical to Claro walnut, which is an expensive, figured west-coast species.


Bloodwood - aka satine, is often confused with Padouk on first glance, however, it has a brighter, truer red coloration and is much harder... one of the hardest woods in the world according to the Janka scale, which makes it an excellent choice for a fretboard or neck laminate. It machines very easily with sharp tools and sands very smooth quickly. It is a relatively common wood that is imported from Cental America, priced modestly, and quartersawn pieces look especially beautiful. Beware of allergies-- can be extremely harmful!!!

Bocote - sometimes erroneously called “Mexican Rosewood”. Bocote is a dense, tight-grained wood that makes very strong, stable necks. It can show many different colors, with a lot of contrast between the grain. Bocote can be hard to find, and expensive as a result

Cocobolo - a wildly figured, colorful species of Rosewood... very oily, which evens out the tone and makes it an excellent choice for a neck, fretboard, or body laminate/veneer, though the weight makes it difficult to use as a solid body. Cocobolo is becoming very rare as demand increases, and it can be extremely expensive. the crazy grain can make it impractical for a 1-piece neck due to possible warping

Koa - known for being available with a shocking flame figure. expensive, dense, and oily.... brighter than mahogany but not as bright as maple or walnut. Koa generally comes in a nice golden brown color. It is relatively rare and somewhat expensive, especially when figured, but it can be used for both bodies and necks.

Purple heart - Purple heart is a heavy south American wood which has the unique quality of being naturally a deep, royal purple. This wood oxidizes over time from a brown when fresh cut to attain its signature purple color, but often changes back to brown over time. It's cheap for an imported wood, and has excellent tonal and physical properties, similar to maple but with a more distinctive high end. Hidden salt deposits can be rough on tools over time. Purple heart is usable for necks or bodies, but heavy.


Wenge - very hard, heavy, stiff, dark, dull brown wood. It can have stripes in its color and texture, but its stiffness makes it an awesome wood for neck laminations. Wenge is moderately expensive, and not always easy to find.


Zebrano - aka Zebrawood... very heavy, endangered, and smells awful when freshly cut or sanded. Has a unique striping pattern from which its name is derived. This wood is ok as a neck lamination or top, but is generally too heavy to be an entire body (not that it hasn’t been done) and not usually regarded as being stable enough to be a fretboard.

Some Medium-rare ones from MT in Austin

Padouk - Bright vivid orange color which oxidizes to a warm brown with use. This waxy feeling wood has an open grain texture similar to rosewood and a tone similar to maple with great mids and attack. This is a heavy to medium weight wood that looks great with an oil finish or clear gloss! This is used by Dean on their low priced XM series guitars.

Poplar - Used extensively by Fender in the past. Tonally, it is similar to Alder. Poplar is a closed grain wood that accepts finish well.

Agathis - A subspecies of pine and is straight-grained, with a fine, even, silky texture and a lustrous surface. It is pale straw to yellow-brown in colour, uniform, light, strong, knot-free and easily worked. It is considered a softwood. It is used extensively on lower prices guitars and basses.

Lacewood - a medium weight wood. The grain design ranges from very small spots to very large spots which create its signature reptilian appearance. Lacewood looks best in the form of a bookmatched laminate top, but is also available for solid bodies. The tone is similar to Alder but the look is very exotic with a fish scale like brilliance under a gloss finish! This wood needs a spray on type finish as opposed to an oil finish.
Last edited by timbit2006 at Feb 10, 2009,
#2
Cool...

LP Addict did one similar to this... but this can all be found on warmoth's site as well.
------

Shwiggity.
#3
How is that the complete list?
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#4
It is pretty much the complete list. Theres not much other woods out there that were put on earth just to be used for guitars.
#7
Well none of those are "just" for guitars. What about Walnut?
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#8
Quote by timbit2006
It is pretty much the complete list. Theres not much other woods out there that were put on earth just to be used for guitars.



Just for guitars? Try again boss.

really, a quick google would have provided you with everything (and more) about what you've posted, and probably saved you the time of typing (I presume you did type that all out...) it all.

EDIT:

So, your telliung me theres more huh? well this'll have to be edited then.


Woah, chap. more? ANYTHING can be used for guitars. serious.

Honestly man, I hate to say it but this thread was kind of a waste. This (and more) is already in another thread. Maybe ask LP to post this in that thread, I'm not sure...
------

Shwiggity.
Last edited by deftonesordie at Feb 9, 2009,
#9
Pine? *cough cough PINECASTER? Cough cough*

Murmurs...
Just call me Bobby
Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list
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#10
I'm getting to typing them all, that's just what my Band Bible said(it's a book) and i am just writing about walnut and pine right now, and a hawaian Koa wood.

EDIT: and, I was also Joking about woods only being able to be used on guitars, shees, cant you tell by the way i was typing that i was being sarcastic?
Last edited by timbit2006 at Feb 9, 2009,
#11
Honestly man, save yourself the time. It's all been covered in another thread.
------

Shwiggity.
#12
Quote by metalwarrior40
Pine? *cough cough PINECASTER? Cough cough*

Murmurs...


Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#13
thats like 9 wood out of a possible like million.

i can think of many more woods thats people have used to build guitars

walnut,
kauri
beech (red,silver)
poplar
rimu


they're just a few out of millions
#16
Well, I had fun typing this, i had nothing better to do, Except play guitar, I find that mine is a more direct and simplifeid and more detailed than LP Addicts guide. He only linked to someone elses work, and did a one/two line description on very rare pointless woods.
#17
You're missing several common ones and a more rare one as well.

Koa - Its weight varies somewhat from medium to heavy and is an excellent tone wood for bass guitar bodies. Koa has a warm sound similar to mahogany, but with a little more brightness.

Padouk - Bright vivid orange color which oxidizes to a warm brown with use. This waxy feeling wood has an open grain texture similar to rosewood and a tone similar to maple with great mids and attack. This is a heavy to medium weight wood that looks great with an oil finish or clear gloss! This is used by Dean on their low priced XM series guitars.

Poplar - Used extensively by Fender in the past. Tonally, it is similar to Alder. Poplar is a closed grain wood that accepts finish well.

Agathis - A subspecies of pine and is straight-grained, with a fine, even, silky texture and a lustrous surface. It is pale straw to yellow-brown in colour, uniform, light, strong, knot-free and easily worked. It is considered a softwood. It is used extensively on lower prices guitars and basses.

A fairly rare one:
Lacewood - a medium weight wood. The grain design ranges from very small spots to very large spots which create its signature reptilian appearance. Lacewood looks best in the form of a bookmatched laminate top, but is also available for solid bodies. The tone is similar to Alder but the look is very exotic with a fish scale like brilliance under a gloss finish! This wood needs a spray on type finish as opposed to an oil finish.
#19
Quote by timbit2006
He only linked to someone elses work, and did a one/two line description on very rare pointless woods.


His descriptions, if you looked on the page, were the ones NOT covered in Warmoth's description. I'd advise you to take a look at what his thread has to provide.
------

Shwiggity.
#20
Here are 10 from my own files that I don't see mentioned. If you copy/paste this elsewhere, don't be a douche and take credit !
Say it's from UG's GB&C forum.


Cherry- hard, dense, stable, finishes well, and has a reddish brown coloration that can have various different shades of tint. tone is rich in midrange and high-end sound, and draws a variety of comparisons to everything from mahogany to maple. expensive due to demand for its use in furniture but easy to find in all sizes as a result

Mesquite- a southwestern American wood. not always easy to find in some regions, but very, very hard and makes a solid fretboard or neck, due to its high stability and resistance to warping. This wood has a dull brownish color that can finish to a deep reddish brown. Sound is clear, similar to walnut, but with less upper midrange character.


Walnut - a darker brown American hardwood. good choice for both necks and bodies. bright sounding, similar to maple but with a slightly less extreme top end. It's heavy and dense, which explains the bright sound but can also be hard on the shoulder. one of the more expensive domestic hardwoods, but is readily available.
Black walnut grows throughout the country and is the less expensive version. It is tonally identical to Claro walnut, which is an expensive, figured west-coast species.


Bloodwood - aka satine, is often confused with Padouk on first glance, however, it has a brighter, truer red coloration and is much harder... one of the hardest woods in the world according to the Janka scale, which makes it an excellent choice for a fretboard or neck laminate. It machines very easily with sharp tools and sands very smooth quickly. It is a relatively common wood that is imported from Cental America, priced modestly, and quartersawn pieces look especially beautiful. Beware of allergies-- can be extremely harmful!!!

Bocote - sometimes erroneously called “Mexican Rosewood”. Bocote is a dense, tight-grained wood that makes very strong, stable necks. It can show many different colors, with a lot of contrast between the grain. Bocote can be hard to find, and expensive as a result

Cocobolo - a wildly figured, colorful species of Rosewood... very oily, which evens out the tone and makes it an excellent choice for a neck, fretboard, or body laminate/veneer, though the weight makes it difficult to use as a solid body. Cocobolo is becoming very rare as demand increases, and it can be extremely expensive. the crazy grain can make it impractical for a 1-piece neck due to possible warping

Koa - known for being available with a shocking flame figure. expensive, dense, and oily.... brighter than mahogany but not as bright as maple or walnut. Koa generally comes in a nice golden brown color. It is relatively rare and somewhat expensive, especially when figured, but it can be used for both bodies and necks.

Korina - “White” Korina and “Black” Limba are the same wood, and can be used in any application where Mahogany would traditionally be used. Korina is slightly less dense than mahogany and was popularized by the Gibson as an alternative to mahogany for some of their larger, heavier body shapes.

Purple heart - Purple heart is a heavy south American wood which has the unique quality of being naturally a deep, royal purple. This wood oxidizes over time from a brown when fresh cut to attain its signature purple color, but often changes back to brown over time. It's cheap for an imported wood, and has excellent tonal and physical properties, similar to maple but with a more distinctive high end. Hidden salt deposits can be rough on tools over time. Purple heart is usable for necks or bodies, but heavy.


Wenge - very hard, heavy, stiff, dark, dull brown wood. It can have stripes in its color and texture, but its stiffness makes it an awesome wood for neck laminations. Wenge is moderately expensive, and not always easy to find.


Zebrano - aka Zebrawood... very heavy, endangered, and smells awful when freshly cut or sanded. Has a unique striping pattern from which its name is derived. This wood is ok as a neck lamination or top, but is generally too heavy to be an entire body (not that it hasn’t been done) and not usually regarded as being stable enough to be a fretboard.
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Owned.

I suggest not screwing with the UGer with the best name on the site.


Quote by Albino_Rhino
I don't see how prostitution is going to help out your string buzz...
Last edited by Rebelw/outaCord at Feb 9, 2009,
#21
Damnit! I hate the 10000 character limit. Makes me angry!!!!!!! I COULD BREAK MY RUBIX CUBE!!!!! ARGGGG!!!!!!!!
#23
of MT's picks, only Lacewood and Koa are rare-- poplar, agathis, and padouk are relatively common. Padouk not as much, but Poplar grows everywhere and often costs under $3 a board foot around here.

I'm glad to see a thread with a full list rather than links-- over time links can break and stuff as pages move, but something like this might be here in another 5 years


EDIT: love you LP
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Owned.

I suggest not screwing with the UGer with the best name on the site.


Quote by Albino_Rhino
I don't see how prostitution is going to help out your string buzz...
#25
i re-upped the pages on the initial page, added a new picture, and i made the ****ing thread a s a progressive thread, if you have a tone wood question ,ask it there, if you have a finding, post it there. theres another one of these pointless threads every week, its no wonder i never come on here anymore.
#26
^I mean no offense to you, but, your tone-wood thread... I find it very confuzing. just cut the BS from the beginning, and give straight info. No "I'm pissed off cause of tone-wood threads every ****ing day!" repeated basically like ten times just different ways of saying it. And thank you Rebelw/Outta chord for supporting me in making ane "EASY" to read and use tone-wood thread.
#27
I'm not gonna get in the middle of this one. My post can go there too, I don't really care. I just think the list format is easier to use. it would be even easier if it was alphabetical. And maybe if someone went through and linked pics to it. But I don't have the motivation for that.
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Owned.

I suggest not screwing with the UGer with the best name on the site.


Quote by Albino_Rhino
I don't see how prostitution is going to help out your string buzz...
#28
yeah god forbid a prospective guitar builder have to do any work and actually learn about wood cell structure and how it effects your tools and tone. not saying to you timbit, but you should have added this to the tone wood thread, i would have gladly posted it up at the top.

im famous for this

but SEARCH BAR
#29
what's hard to read? Arial font, 12 point, it's the same format.
Honestly, I understand that you took a bunch of time typing what you have, but this honestly is kinda ridiculous. Fact of the matter is, LP beat you to it. His thread is just as functional as yours, if not more. Just because you have to look for something doesn't mean it's not there.
------

Shwiggity.
#30
I like LP's better.

and your complete list needs ovangkol.
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Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

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#34
Addressing the multiple threads a day thing: if you think it's bad in here, check out the GG&A >< It's about twice as bad.

EDIT: Also, your thread looks more badass since the last time I saw it since you added that chart from bmusic
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
Last edited by Shinozoku at Feb 10, 2009,
#35
Quote by deftonesordie
^we've confronted that already...

Quote by TunerAddict
BEST PAINTJOB EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
That is the sickest paint job in all of GB&C



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PM Alter-Bridge or The_Random_Hero to join.
Australians only.

#36
Ok sorry for posting another tone-wood thread. I didn't realize there was another(It's so far down the list anyways). Didn't want to make any enemies on UG, so lets just say both the threads are equally as good.
#37
all y'all need to sit back, relax, change your tampons and move on with life.

There's a life tip from your Uncle Phil
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology
#38
Quote by timbit2006
Ok sorry for posting another tone-wood thread. I didn't realize there was another(It's so far down the list anyways). Didn't want to make any enemies on UG, so lets just say both the threads are equally as good.

That's why you should join them together under LP's, as he was there first and is, indeed, UG's wood Kawn-e-sewer
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#39
^Most UGers probably have long hair... Please don't try to mistake us for the wrong sex...

Now i know your name... Uncle Phil of 1432 Canoon Road... That's right... I know where you live...
#40
Theres a 10000 character limit per post so there would be no way we could fit both. Theres like 5 pages of crap under his(sorry if theres any useful info)
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