#1
i have noticed that if i play a note on my guitar and have the amp loud enough i can get unlimited sustain on the string as the amp is vibrating the string. that said this only happens occasionally and by accident. i also noticed that on some recordings there are pinch harmonics that don't ring out. how is this possible and how can i do this?
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I got a black Les Paul, and this Texan told me it wasn't as good as other color guitars becuse it was a 'nigger.'

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I'd hit that like Carmel hits the ban button.
#3
Yup, this is because the fundamental frequency of the string or length of string (from saddle to where you're fretting) is being output by the amp. All objects have fundamental frequencies and these frequencies cause them to vibrate at that frequency. It's how for example a wine glass shatters to an appropriate note with enough amplitude (volume basically).

O yeah, it's how sustainer pickups work btw, only they use electromagnetic waves.
Last edited by James13v at Feb 10, 2009,
#4
sustainer pickups? now you have me lost
Quote by HomerHitter
I got a black Les Paul, and this Texan told me it wasn't as good as other color guitars becuse it was a 'nigger.'

Quote by roosoh13
"Ok folks, our in flight movie will be a series of sex tapes your parents have made"

Quote by coryklok
I'd hit that like Carmel hits the ban button.
#5
Quote by meakel
Wait. The sound from the amp, vibrates the string?

That's feedback
Call me Batman.
#9
This is like when i invented the solar powered lightbulb.

Everyone laughed at me.
#11
i know exactly what he's talking about. the 15th fret of my b string can sustain for hours..... definitely that frequency stuff
#12
Quote by Chriis
This is like when i invented the solar powered lightbulb.

Everyone laughed at me.

I invented that when I was 12.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#13
yes, the sound from the amp can make the string vibrate.

ive used that phenomenon in the past to tune my classic guitar, cause if I fret the low E string on "A" and pluck it, I can see the 5th string vibrating when its in tune.
#15
there's only one catch in having 'infinite sustain' while practicing

tinnitus
#16
Definitions first.
Sustain is measured by how long a plucked string is audible without amplification.
Controlled Feedback is what happens when the amplified sound from the speakers causes the guitar to vibrate and keep the string going.
Uncontrolled Feedback is the whistling caused by having a guitar too close to the speaker.
Playing with controlled sustain is fun. Until recently it was common to see guitarists leaning the body or headstock of their guitar against the speaker cab to induce greater feedback. Don't see so much of it lately. Some guitars are better at this trick than others and it can usually be determined by the actual sustain time. Gibsons from the sixties are very good with a time of around 8-10 seconds unamplified. For some reason Fenders seem less naturally sustaining. One guitar I had was fitted with a brass nut which, as it was a Gibson style (no trem. TOM bridge etc), had very good natural sustain (it was also straight through walnut which helped too).
I'm very excited about my new guitar as one reviewer claimed to have discovered it has 20 sec of natural sustain. I'll be reviewing soon after it arrives.

Tinnitus? What did you say? Stop that whistling!
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

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