#1
Hey folks, I was just looking at an exam question which was (sorry, I can't paste it in):

a single line with a time sig, and a few notes on it. It then said "answer the following rhythm".

What does that mean? sorry if that's a bit vague, I'll elaborate if you need me to.

Thanks,
M
#2
??? may need you to elaborate on that one! is it maybe a commonly used rythmn from a particular guitar style that you have to identify?
#3
write a similar rythem to the question
Anarchy is the future.... realize it, live it , LOVE it!

the darkest hour never comes in the night, you can sleep with a gun, but when you gonna wake up and fight ... for yourself?
#4
^ Ok, so just change the note values round a bit, but make sure it still fits the time signature right?
#6
3_Q EEEE_| Q EE Q_|________|________
4

It's the best way I can think of getting this across lol! So basically its:

in 3/4
1st bar: quarter then four eighths
2nd bar: qaurter, two eighths, quarter.

The question is that I have to answer this rhythm on the next two bars.
#7
I think it means thats like the question phrase, and you have to come up with an answering phrase to it.
#8
Quote by zhilla
I think it means thats like the question phrase, and you have to come up with an answering phrase to it.


Bingo. It's a common question to test to see if you can hear the rhythm by looking at it.
#9
Quote by Freepower
Bingo. It's a common question to test to see if you can hear the rhythm by looking at it.


So there isn't a staright answer then, it's just your interpretation?
#11
Quote by mdc
When notating a broken chord, the notes would be adjacent to each other with or without a beam depending on the values.

Sorry for the bump. Am I right about this? I somehow managed to delete my previous post about it!
Last edited by mdc at Feb 10, 2009,
#12
Quote by mdc
Sorry for the bump. Am I right about this? I somehow managed to delete my previous post about it!



what exactally do you mean??
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#13
Quote by mdc
Sorry for the bump. Am I right about this? I somehow managed to delete my previous post about it!


Well, this really depends what instrument you're writing for. If you want the notes to be played with definite timing and sustain into each other you can write it with tied notes. Beaming is more to do with rhythmic groupings, I'm pretty sure you meant what I just said.
#14
Hey agian, thanx for the answers. Rather than start a new thread I thought I'd just carry on with this one. Ok, so I have another question .

1. If I was to notate G Melodic Minor on the staff, what key signature would I use?

I'm thinking it would be Bb Major, so 2 flats right? That would definately work if I was notating the scale descending.

But what about ascending? The reason I ask is that I can't write it without using just b's. I have to use the # on the F to satisfy all 7 letters being used.

So my "actual" question is....

Would I use a Bb key sig for the ascending G Melodic Minor, but use the b's and the one # for the F?
#16
Quote by mdc
Hey agian, thanx for the answers. Rather than start a new thread I thought I'd just carry on with this one. Ok, so I have another question .

1. If I was to notate G Melodic Minor on the staff, what key signature would I use?

I'm thinking it would be Bb Major, so 2 flats right? That would definately work if I was notating the scale descending.

But what about ascending? The reason I ask is that I can't write it without using just b's. I have to use the # on the F to satisfy all 7 letters being used.

So my "actual" question is....

Would I use a Bb key sig for the ascending G Melodic Minor, but use the b's and the one # for the F?

When writing minors you (unless the question states other wise) use the key sig of the relative major, so yes 2 flats.

Then the actual note heads you would write would be (ascending):
G A B C D E natural F# G and descending:
G F E D C B A G
#17
Quote by 12345abcd3
and descending:
G F E D C B A G

Wouldn't the B and E be flattened? Since thats G Natural Minor?

Edit, oh yes of course, cuz they're already shown at the Treble Clef. Yeah yeah ok sorry, I got it!
Last edited by mdc at Feb 17, 2009,
#18
Quote by mdc
Would I use a Bb key sig for the ascending G Melodic Minor, but use the b's and the one # for the F?
G Melodic Minor should be written with a Gm key signature, so 2 flats. You can't have sharps AND flats in a key signature.
#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You can't have sharps AND flats in a key signature.

I know that. That's why I was asking if it was ok to label the "F" note head with a sharp when writing out the ascending scale on the staff.
#22
Sup folks,

I've started learning how to write out notation, and realized there are certain ways to group notes and rests in a bar, depending on the time signature. So my question is:

In 3/8, if I wanted to notate a whole bar of rest, would I use a dotted crotchet rest, or 3 quaver rests?

I'm thinking it would be the latter, because the time signature is indicating that the meter is beaten in eighths yes?

Thanks again,
M
Last edited by mdc at Feb 26, 2009,
#23
I'm pretty sure crotchet means quarter... but yes. It would be a dotted quarter note. I would do the dotted quarter (crotchet..?) but it's really up to you. There is no 'correct' way to put a rest in a measure. Some are just faster/easier than others :]
#24
^ Ha, yeah I'm English lol! Tbh I prefer the American term as it makes more sense to me, I just like to be familiar with both.

I suppose it's which ever way it makes the music easier to read. I suppose one rest symbol (dotted quarter) would be less complicated to look at than 3 eighth rests.
#25
Quote by mdc
^ Ha, yeah I'm English lol! Tbh I prefer the American term as it makes more sense to me, I just like to be familiar with both.

I suppose it's which ever way it makes the music easier to read. I suppose one rest symbol (dotted quarter) would be less complicated to look at than 3 eighth rests.

Haha yeah. I'm trying to learn the other way as well. It's hard for me since they sound so different. But I agree, the Western way (am I right with that?) makes more sense.

It's pretty much up to the composer. As long as you get what you want, then you're good.
#26
Quote by mdc
Sup folks,

I've started learning how to write out notation, and realized there are certain ways to group notes and rests in a bar, depending on the time signature. So my question is:

In 3/8, if I wanted to notate a whole bar of rest, would I use a dotted crotchet rest, or 3 quaver rests?

I'm thinking it would be the latter, because the time signature is indicating that the meter is beaten in eighths yes?

Thanks again,
M

Writing a dotted crotchet rest is perfectly fine and most times this is preferable because it is more clear.

For almost all (in fact, I think all) time signatures it is acceptable to write whole bar rests as one rest.

Edit:^
About the "up to the composer" thing, there are rules for writing standard notation (eg. beaming notes into beats, not beaming notes across the middle in 4/4) so it is not always up to the composer. Most of these rules, however, are meant to make sure the music is as clear as possible.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Feb 26, 2009,
#27
yeah..

you have to take into consideration the grouping of the note..
if the meter is simple or compound
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#28
yeah..

you have to take into consideration the grouping of the note..
if the meter is simple or compound
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#29
Quote by 12345abcd3

Edit:^
About the "up to the composer" thing, there are rules for writing standard notation (eg. beaming notes into beats, not beaming notes across the middle in 4/4) so it is not always up to the composer. Most of these rules, however, are meant to make sure the music is as clear as possible.

For rests isn't it basically up to the composer? I know you have to beam notes if you have 8th, 16th, so-on-so-forth. But I figured that rests could pretty much be up to the composer since they aren't beamed or grouped.
#30
Quote by DiminishedFifth
For rests isn't it basically up to the composer? I know you have to beam notes if you have 8th, 16th, so-on-so-forth. But I figured that rests could pretty much be up to the composer since they aren't beamed or grouped.

There are still rules for rests, but not as many. For example, technically in 4/4 it would be incorect to write:
dotted crotchet, crotchet rest, dotted crotchet

But as you can see, writing this would be quite hard to sight read whereas the correct way (replace the crotchet rest with two quaver ones) is considerably easier (at least for me) to read.
#31
Quote by 12345abcd3
There are still rules for rests, but not as many. For example, technically in 4/4 it would be incorect to write:
dotted crotchet, crotchet rest, dotted crotchet

But as you can see, writing this would be quite hard to sight read whereas the correct way (replace the crotchet rest with two quaver ones) is considerably easier (at least for me) to read.

Yeah I know. I agree with you on how it would be easier to read. That's how I would write that as well. Especially since you (at least for me) have to count the 8th notes in 4/4.

But thank you for informing me on it. I knew there were rules, but they're pretty much, as you've said, common sense.
#32
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Yeah I know. I agree with you on how it would be easier to read. That's how I would write that as well. Especially since you (at least for me) have to count the 8th notes in 4/4.

But thank you for informing me on it. I knew there were rules, but they're pretty much, as you've said, common sense.

No problem .
#33
Hey there again, I found myself in a brass and woodwind music shop the other day (makes a change from a guitar shop tbh!), and I was looking through some music books by Jamey Aebersold, I was gonna by them but I've been laid off for 4 mths now and I'm struggling.....anyway...

I came a cross a coupla pages where he mentioned the Bebop scale.

So you get a major bebop and minor bebop?

Major is by adding a #5 to the major scale (Ionian).
Minor is by adding a major 3rd to the Dorian scale.

I didn't have time to carry on with the reading, but are there any others? Cuz I was wondering if this added note is included in the other five modes? Or is it just these two?

Ty.