#1
I had my first guitar lesson today, and already have a homework.

i have 2 weeks to learn all the notes up and down the fretboard of by heart, and i struggle with the notation/theory side of things.

any tips on learning all the notes? any way to test my self?

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#2
Yes i think if you're a total newcomer to music it's gonna take longer than 2 weeks, because you should really figure out why the notes that come next do come next. (Intervals)

Apart from that all you can do is play them, hear them, memorise them.
#3
1 thing, will sound stupid and ill get flamed for it, but seriously, print off a picture of the board, and write/print the name of each note on it. remember theres no B# or E#.

This is how ive started doing it (being pretty new to music as well) only thing is i have no dealine, and well i'll watch the thread for advice also
#5
lol i wish i had learned how to actually read music. but yeah ive seen some big ass pictures of the frets with each note labeled

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#6
I would just say memorize, just try a variety of ways to memorize them...with a limited timeframe that is really all you can do..

also scrib notes.
Last edited by toby3p0 at Feb 10, 2009,
#8
say them out loud as you play the notes. it helps if you can imagine the fretboard and each note location as part of a pattern you can see in your mind and feel under your fingers and not just understand the information youre trying to teach your brain and fingers by its name. its a steep learning curve at first and it may seem usless to your playing skill to know sixth string plus tenth fret equals a D the way you understand it when you learn it but after a while you start feeling the notes under your fingers. it takes a while to get it.
#9
The way I did it was by making 'reference points' I geuss you could call them.

As long as you remember there are no B# or E# you can just work out the notes from your reference points and eventually you can do it automatically.

The main two I used were on the 5th fret (used them for tuning so I automatically know 5th fret 6th string is an A for example) and 12th fret is just the same note as the string. From there you can work out the notes quickly without having to go from the open string and up the fret board as the further you can be above a 'reference point' is 3 semitones (unless its over the 12th but the pattern just repeats anyway).

Hope that helps if you understand that.
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#10
sorry, i should have noted i've been playing four years, i know the notes just slowly and in order (chromaticly). the octave thing sounds like it would make things easier. thanks so far

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#11
Quote by armourofcontemp
1 thing, will sound stupid and ill get flamed for it, but seriously, print off a picture of the board, and write/print the name of each note on it. remember theres no B# or E#.

This is how ive started doing it (being pretty new to music as well) only thing is i have no dealine, and well i'll watch the thread for advice also




how about just learning all the non accidental notes
and then to find all the others you'll just have to apply a # or b
and there IS a B# and Cb
and there IS an E# and an Fb
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#13
Quote by victoryaloy


how about just learning all the non accidental notes
and then to find all the others you'll just have to apply a # or b
and there IS a B# and Cb
and there IS an E# and an Fb


Yeah there is, but for the sake of learning the notes on the fretboard I would say it is sufficient to know a semitone up from B is C and a semitone up from E is F.
#14
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Yeah there is, but for the sake of learning the notes on the fretboard I would say it is sufficient to know a semitone up from B is C and a semitone up from E is F.


That is what he just said... but you shouldn't start out thinking those notes don't exist, they do.

Also, they way I memorized them was learning scales. I learned C major scale all the way across the board and what notes I was playing. The other notes that werent in C were easy to figure out because I know they were sharp or flat.
Last edited by blueriver at Feb 10, 2009,
#15
Pick a section of the fretboard you want to learn, for example the E on the G string (9th fret), The G on the B string (8th fret) and the A on the B string (10th fret), and make a lick or phrase using only these notes. If you have a problem improvise using them and say the note name in your head everytime you play it.
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#16
try this:

learn one string at a time...12 notes per string...all chromatic...and only 5 strings as the 1st & 6th string are the same (E)....

do this several time and you instantly see the repetition of notes as you move to the next string...

then do the first three frets of ALL the strings then the next three...etc (take small bites..but chew it well)

it does "sink in" be patient and determined with learning it...

you may not feel you "know" the fretboard in two weeks...but you will know much more of it than you think...

learning the fretboard seems to be very frustrating for new players...(but one of the most important, from my viewpoint)

play well

wolf
#17
I think armourofcontemp siad it right. Thats what I did. I drew the fretboard at least 50 times in 5 years. I had all the dots connected for chords and scales and all. Thats how I learned all the notes and chord shapes and scale patterns. I didnt even need the guitar to practice as this was what I practiced. But I didnt learn in 2 weeks. If you can and do, cool. Just remember it really isnt that hard though. Just take your time and dont try to force yourself to learn them.
#18
I do it by concentrating on a note a day - all over the fretboard. I only bother with naturals though - once you can find them sharps and flats are easy as they are just a semi-tone up or down
#19
Well....the good news is you really only have to learn the notes on the first 11 frets of the top five strings.

So that's only 55 notes to remember!!! Only 30 without the sharps/flats!!!!

The top and bottom strings are th same (obviously) and the pattern starts over again at the 12th fret.
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#20
Quote by armourofcontemp
1 thing, will sound stupid and ill get flamed for it, but seriously, print off a picture of the board, and write/print the name of each note on it. remember theres no B# or E#.

This is how ive started doing it (being pretty new to music as well) only thing is i have no dealine, and well i'll watch the thread for advice also


B# and E# do exist.

I found the notes to be fairly easy to remember, its just the alphabet and you already know that.

ABCDEFG, sharps after all of them except B and E. The name of the open string that you are on tells you what note to start with.

Open E, F, F#, G, G#...

Open A, A#, B, C, C#, D...

Open D, D#, E, F, F#...
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#21
I think it goes without saying that you can memorize the note names along the E string pretty easily. Everybody should be able to do that and do it pretty early in their playing.

What I did after that was find all the other occurances of those notes in relation to those on the E.
For example, find all the C notes and get a mental picture of how they relate to the C notes on the E strings.
You've got a C five frets down on the A string, or you've got the "octave shape" to get a C on the D string, from there you go five frets back again to get a C on the G string, or an octave shape plus one to get one on the B string. That's all the C's.

For a good while there, I found that if I ever got lost, it only took me a split second to reference the E string and zip over to the note or position I was looking for. I also built a lot of fingering patterns based around targeting a root note, and I would moving around to find them in relation to the E string reference point.

I also didn't necessarily learn all the notes that way, only a few - because I would quickly know where an A or a D or an E was, and I could jump a couple frets forward or back to get to the note I wanted without much thinking.

Eventually, I just came to remember notes on the other strings just as easily as I did the E, and I didn't rely on the whole reference point thing as much, but I still do it sometimes.
#22
Quote by metallicafan616
I had my first guitar lesson today, and already have a homework.

i have 2 weeks to learn all the notes up and down the fretboard of by heart, and i struggle with the notation/theory side of things.

any tips on learning all the notes? any way to test my self?



The best way to truly learn the notes is to use the notes. In other words trying to memorize ALL the notes on the fretboard before you can play a single song will not likely yield the best results. it's hard to remember something that you haven't experienced in context. You need to be able to connect that note knowledge to something meaningful.
It takes time and experience for this knowledge to really sink in.

Some things you can work on:

- Learning to read standard notation in all positions is a great way to solidify your knowledge of the notes on the neck

- Learn the notes on the 6th and 5th strings and connect that to the names of chords that have roots on those strings. (like power chords and barre chords)
* This btw is a good place to start, assuming you don't yet read notation, and are into songs that use power chords and barre chords.

- Learn important relationships on the fretboard (such as the open to 12th fret relationship, octave shapes, and adjacent string relationships)

here are some more tips that may help you:

Learning the notes on the neck


Personally, I don't it's realistic for you to truly know all the notes on the neck on 2 weeks, but maybe it will serve as a 1st exposure for you.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 11, 2009,
#24
I just play each note in every position, listening to how it sounds and noting where it is, working for me.