#1
What constitutes an altered chord? I need to play a D7 altered chord. I thought it meant just one tone changed but is it a specific tone raised or lowered?
what is the music theory and what does it teach you, like scales, solos, and to build speed???



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#2
You add an altered extension to a dominant chord such as: #9, b9, #11, #5 (not added, just raised), b5 (like #5), b13, and probably more I can't think of now.

If your music just says Dalt, it is to allow you the flexability of choosing which alterations sound best.

Can someone verify that #5 and b5 chords are altered chords? I confused myself with the b13 and #11 comments.
#3
Yeah #5 and b5 are altered chords.

I would interpret D7 altered chord as D+7 (or D7#5).
Si
#4
Okay, so it's mainly preference but there are more common alterations then? Thanks guys. Working on learning 'Round Midnight.
what is the music theory and what does it teach you, like scales, solos, and to build speed???



Check out my recordings
#5
it can be a bit confusing .. the term "altered" ... to me altered applies to only dominate chords ... but in jazz harmony it could apply to minor and major as well..Maj 7b5 / Maj 7#5 etc
...the symbols are not standardized, which is part of the problem...ie: the sharp and flat signs could be a + or - or # or b .. ie 7#5 / 7+5 .. 7-5 / 7b5

to Sue...i appreciate your input on this forum alot..yes i would consider chords with altered symbols to be "altered" .. for me it means more freedom in playing with them and against them in solo work..some of the charts i read can be very confusing and need adjusting on the spot in some sessions / recordings etc...when working with "head sheets" that are written in hast and do not regard a sense of "key" for the piece of music to be played

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Feb 10, 2009,