#1
is there any reason you shouldn't be able to pic as fast with a thin pic as you can with a thick pic when doing it properly? im like bipolar with my pic use - using both 0.60 and 1.5mm for practing the same stuff.
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#2
when theyre thin, they bend more so, you have to move your hand more to pick. shouldnt matter otherwise.
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#3
i really dont care. i play with dunlop tortex .73's, 1mm stubbys and 2mm stubbys.
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#4
I honestly don't understand how people play with thin, floppy picks.
When I strike the string, I want the note to be there as quick as possible.
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#6
Floppy picks bend as you hit the string and it requires further movement of the wrist in order to get the note to ring out, which is a bad thing. Economy and precision is key and floppy thin picks fail at both.
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Last edited by allislost at Feb 10, 2009,
#7
When I didn't have very good picking technique it always seemed to me a thin pick was easier. It was more forgiving of the strings and seemed to make picking through the string easier. But, that was ALL due to bad technique. When I improved my technique a thicker pick not only was easier, but gives much more control.
#8
I personally find thin picks alot better for strumming and thicker ones better for single note playing, I like to meet in the middle and mostly use medium ones.
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#9
Quote by rabbittroopsux
is there any reason you shouldn't be able to pic as fast with a thin pic as you can with a thick pic when doing it properly? im like bipolar with my pic use - using both 0.60 and 1.5mm for practing the same stuff.

any picker who can play fast will tell you that thicker picks are better. two reasons: 1) the dont bend as much therefor they take less time to spring back making it better for fast picking. and 2) the tone if better. it allows you hit the strings with more force so you can play louder plus they just seem to give a rounder, fuller sound to the guitar. i find there is too much noise with thin picks.

but if you are just a joe strummer, i suppose there isnt anything wrong with thin picks. but if you want more volume, better tone and the ability to pick well, then use thicker picks. i dont go any lower than 1mm. i usually use the 1.14 purple tortex though. i used to use the blues all the time(1mm) but i moved up. i use the blues for my mandolin now.

edit: also, i dont get the whole "thin is better for strumming". a guy told me its because you can get a kind of washboard sound with them so you can have the chords and purcusion atthe same time....but i can get the same effect with thick picks. if you know how to use a pick properly it should be an issue. you really just need to control the angle of your pick so you can go accross the strings nicely.
Last edited by Blind In 1 Ear at Feb 11, 2009,
#10
Thick picks don't have the 'crack' of a medium. I can't live without it.

I think thin picks (<1mm) are good for sheer endurance, but not much else.
#11
Thinners picks are slower, and tend to have more of the "unwanted" part of the pick noise.

Even if u have the picking skills of PG, his licks will sounds sloppy with thin picks, because the problem ultimately lies in the pick and not ur technique.

Quote by Blind In 1 Ear

edit: also, i dont get the whole "thin is better for strumming". a guy told me its because you can get a kind of washboard sound with them so you can have the chords and purcusion atthe same time....but i can get the same effect with thick picks. if you know how to use a pick properly it should be an issue. you really just need to control the angle of your pick so you can go accross the strings nicely.


This is what I said above^^ that pick noise you get is for alot of people very appealing. Also in a "Crowded" mix, where you have bass,synths,vocals etc, they often just use the pick noise of an acoustic guitar being played to throw it in, to give the impression of an acoustic being played, without the whole "Body of sound", to decrease mud.

If you mix/produce a lot, you'll understand the benefits of this.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 11, 2009,
#12
edit: also, i dont get the whole "thin is better for strumming". a guy told me its because you can get a kind of washboard sound with them so you can have the chords and purcusion atthe same time....but i can get the same effect with thick picks. if you know how to use a pick properly it should be an issue. you really just need to control the angle of your pick so you can go accross the strings nicely.

Its because the pick glides much easier over the strings, I find with thick picks its easier to get an ugly thud type sound when you are digging into your strumming. I cant stand thin picks for single note playing though.
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#13
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Last edited by Guitartist at Feb 11, 2009,
#14
Hand tells pick what to do, pick tells string what to do.

If the pick is thin, then you can end up having your strings telling your pick what to do.

Hence, thick pick is definately best for any precision work, unless for some reason you really want the sound of a thin pick.
#15
I use different picks for different things. I started with 1.0 tortex picks and slowly moved to thinner. But for acoustic I generally use the thinnest I can find. For heavy music, heavy pick. More control. For rock or funky type stuff, I use the yellow or orange tortex picks as they give a little more than the thicker ones. Its really about preference.
#16
Even if u have the picking skills of PG, his licks will sounds sloppy with thin picks, because the problem ultimately lies in the pick and not ur technique.


Paul Gilbert uses 0.6mm Picks btw, so I certainly wouldnt say you are necessarily going to sound sloppy - but I do agree that it is likely to be more difficult for reasons described above
#17
i play acoustic and if im strumming i use a thin pick eg a dunlop 0.40mm but if im picking with a plectrum and not my fingers i use a thick one just to get the best sound because u want people to hear your guitar picking. . .
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#18
Quote by Guitartist

Badass.
I use mediums, Thicks are alright, but thins are too flimsy.

Is there any good way to get rid of the picking sound? you cant really hear it on most songs, but on some you can hear them pick the note.
#19
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Thinners picks are slower, and tend to have more of the "unwanted" part of the pick noise.

Even if u have the picking skills of PG, his licks will sounds sloppy with thin picks, because the problem ultimately lies in the pick and not ur technique.


Actually Paul has started using thinner picks, about 0.75-1mm.

Saw him live and he wasn't sloppy.

TS just use which ever pick feels comfortable to you. No one cares if you can go Xbpm faster if you use a thick pick.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Feb 11, 2009,
#20
Quote by griffRG7321


TS just use which ever pick feels comfortable to you. No one cares if you can go Xbpm faster if you use a thick pick.


umm, i care - hence the thread

tnx for replies guys. imma stick with my 1.5 gators.
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#21
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Thinners picks are slower, and tend to have more of the "unwanted" part of the pick noise.

Even if u have the picking skills of PG, his licks will sounds sloppy with thin picks, because the problem ultimately lies in the pick and not ur technique.


This is what I said above^^ that pick noise you get is for alot of people very appealing. Also in a "Crowded" mix, where you have bass,synths,vocals etc, they often just use the pick noise of an acoustic guitar being played to throw it in, to give the impression of an acoustic being played, without the whole "Body of sound", to decrease mud.

If you mix/produce a lot, you'll understand the benefits of this.

well again like i said, you can do that without a thin pick. you just dont hold it as hard really. that way it flops more and gets a similar effect.

but im not really talking about that kind of noise. not te washboard type sound but it just makes more noise on the strings when you're pickin' and it mkes the tone suffer imo. makes it sound thinner. and when you play lead lines, that sucks.
#22
Thin picks work really well using "slicing" where your pick is at a sharp angle to the string which stops them from "flexing" too much, you can get quite a nice "scratchy" tone with this method which a has a bit more character.
#23
After a Paul Gilbert show last year he gave me a couple of his picks and they're pretty damn thin but I like the sound he gets out of them. I tend to think thicker pics are perhaps easier to precisely pick with but thinner ones have a better sound.
#24
Quote by -efx-
After a Paul Gilbert show last year he gave me a couple of his picks and they're pretty damn thin but I like the sound he gets out of them. I tend to think thicker pics are perhaps easier to precisely pick with but thinner ones have a better sound.



He probably holds it more like a Jazz iii pick, where only a small portion of the pick is sticking out, which if you did math on school means less surface, thus the force is more concentrated, which gives more stiffness.

I mean use ur common sense, it's not BS or something, but play with a thinner pick the same as you play with a thicker pick, and in fast passages ur sound quality diminishes.

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#25
Too think pickups have a delay between when you pick and when the string makes sounds because it's floppy. The best thing is think but not floppy plectrums. I have this Purple Dunlop plectrum which you can't bend but still is rather thin 0.83 I think.
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#26
i use a red tortex! .50
Pretty Damn thin
But I find its great for strumming, I hate heavy picks because I feel like i am screwing my strings over, You cant strum fast with them unless you do it extremely softly.
Thick picks arent even great for picking, I find they clunk the strings and are to chunky to actually move around. They feel damn awkward.
Thin picks are light, easy to move, and flexible so its easier to strum, and I still get extremely good accuracy when picking, that just comes with practice.

Thin picks however do have a massive attack on the strings, but you can use that to your advantage if you want a percussive sound.

Thick picks are for shredding...... Thin are for Strumming :]
#27
Quote by xxdarrenxx


I mean use ur common sense, it's not BS or something, but play with a thinner pick the same as you play with a thicker pick, and in fast passages ur sound quality diminishes.



I wouldn't say dimishes, just changes. I like using thin picks for soloing. I will agree that it will slow you down, but it also has benefits.

When scraping (something I do in maybe 80% of my solos) it gives it a nicer sound, to my ear anyway. I also like to play alot of partial and full chords in my soloing, so I like it for that.

If you work on it, you can quickly switch from a long grip to the very end of the pick to use it more like a thick one (I do this by quickly hitting the pick end against the pick guard).
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