#1
It looks like a lot of the pores? are showing and it just looks really dry and old. What can I do to remedy this? Its rosewood and it doesn't have any finish on it but it has a lot of Mother of Pearl inlays on it.
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#4
Well rosewood, does have pretty big grain but if you mean that it is like white then it is light then it may be dry.
#5
I made a post about cleaning my guitar; and yeah, my neck is dirty too.
Quote by Chaos Nil
To clean a Rosewood fretboard, use a small amount of lemon oil. Don't use anything else, and don't use that if its a maple fretboard especially.

I'd double-check before you do that though (I've never tried it).
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#6
Aesthetically it looks less appealing, but isn't the tone increased when it's dry?


How dryer the wood, how more consistent the vibrations are, since water/wetness act like dampeners for the vibrations.

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#7
Quote by SOCOOLITHURTS
My neck looks really dry....
It looks like a lot of the pores? are showing and it just looks really dry and old. What can I do to remedy this?

Try moisturising after you shave. Yeah I know it doesn't feel very manly, but it works wonders. Also make sure you shave with the hair and not against it, going against it can cut through thick stubble a little quicker but it can also rip out hair roots which is the main cause of razor burn.

Its rosewood and it doesn't have any finish on it but it has a lot of Mother of Pearl inlays on it.
Oh. Well, for rosewood I support the lemon oil suggestion. Make sure to use only the smallest amount though on a good clean inkless microfibre cloth and just lightly smooth over the board, you don't want to drown it in the stuff.
Though this won't stop a fretboard getting worn down, it's just a temporary remedy. After a few year's use I would expect any rosewood fretboard - no matter how well cared for - to become dry and to show signs of wear. How long it takes depends on how much you use it, how you use it, how you store it and also on your skin type and the condition of the natural oils in your skin, but as a general rule of thumb I don't think I've ever seen a rosewood fretboard still looking slick and new after any more than three years at most. By the time they hit the ten year marks there's always some gray marks, the grain's opened up, etc etc.
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