#1
Hi guys,

I've been playing guitar for a few months now, and I definitely want to go further then bedroom practice.
I think I transmitted the "I wanna play an instrument" disease to some mates, one of them started playing guitar two weeks ago, and he's really enthousiastic(sp?).
So another friend desperately wants to start playing bass, and yet another has wanted to take up drumming again (which he quit years back) but didn't have the money for it, but now that he has a job, he's started saving.

So the drummer said his dad wouldn't mind having us all in their shed in the yard. (so yeah, misleading topic title, eh?) Which should fit seeing as we've had like 20 people stacking in that thing.
We all still need to learn our instrument, no doubt about that. But I can safely say that I'm getting there, and the other guitarist is really driven, apparently he can't shut up about it. :P
But I doubt it'll hurt to start looking ahead.

So, I had two questions:
One:
How do we start?
My idea would be to try out a few simple songs, we're all basically into metal (me mainly the classical kind, them more the newer kind, but whatever, I figured a cool name would be Defenders Of The Faith...Judas Priest album....get it? Faith as in metal?....I'm funny....*cough*)
However, my question is: How much did you people practice at first? We all live pretty close so that's not a problem.
Once a week for 3-4 hours? Or more often and shorter, 1-2 hours? Tips please!

Also, we're all still pretty poor, pretty young (19-21). Our hopefully soon to be bassist has been looking for an axe for 2 weeks, but he can't find any second hand thingy within his price range(Anyone with a spare bass near Oss in ye aulde Netherlands willing to sell it for around €150 ? Amp already taken care off, I believe.)

No money for extra amps leads us to a major problem, I think: We don't have cars ourselves, so hauling our gear over to the drummer's place and back again would be a huge hassle, unless there's decent amps that are light so we can take em on our bikes.
So I was thinking of a different solution: Just planting a pc there with multiple soundcards (with mic ports of course) and put some cheap speakers on there.
Does anyone know if that could work? I read a topic on here, I believe, that detailed how to use your electric guitar on your comp and get at least bareable sound.
I tried this with my dad's ancient semi-electric 12 string and I was getting some sort of signal, but no sound.
Anyone ever tried this with a guitar that isn't twice as old as you?

Also, I've no clue who we could possibly ask as a singer.
So I fancied the idea of being a vocalist before I got really interested in guitar, but I've got no vocal talent at all. Although I think I do have a decent range. Would it be a good idea to try and do both guitar and vocals? Where do I start with the singing? :P
Last edited by MarauderNL at Feb 11, 2009,
#4
I'd say the best advice I can give you to start out with would be to all learn a few easy songs, to get the feel of playing with a band. Something like Paranoid by Black Sabbath or Breaking the Law by Judas Priest (since you said you all liked metal).

Skills will come with time. If you can't handle a solo or part of a song, just skip it until you can.
#5
Good thing I'm learning Paranoid right now, then.
But how much time is recommended for a starting band?
I'm sort of afraid that if we only practice once a week, we'll have forgotten half of it by the next session.

Also, I guess I'll just buy a Roland Microcube and the amp hauling problem will be solved.
#6
Best advice I have...just have fun. Learn a few covers and just see where it takes you. If you go in with the 'gonna make it big' attitude, you're going to hate it. I've had two bands break up in the past because we started getting too serious about it too early and started hating it. Just cover some stuff and have fun...then worry about adding your own material later.
#7
Very true, eyebanez. But just dumping our stuff over there and having no clue what the FAQ we should be doing is the other end of that spectrum.
Just wanted a general idea of how to do things, so we don't have to go asking around if/when we really want to get serious.
And, well, seeing as we've been mates for over a year now, I don't really see us not having any fun. :P

But thanks for the replies, guys. (Look, I'm a rhyming master! sort off.....)
#8
To marauderNL, Thanks, I have Been looking for this forum forever... I Been Playing For About 1 and a half years Now and wanted to start a band, but i never new how to get started... I'm young, well younger than MarauderNL (15 years old) And i know I'm a little too young, but i've had experience(church band) Where i played acoustic guitar... but ever since i started playing i wanted to play in a band, but i don't want to bet serious just have fun...
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#9
Just learn a few covers, and have fun for now. Dont make it serious until it has to be.
Agree on a few tunes and learn em.
#10
I wouldn't waste time learning covers unless you really think it'll help you guys. Instead, jump strait into writing your own songs, when you see how much your band progresses over time (songwriting wise), it'll seriously motivate you and keep you confident. As for practice, my band practices on Saturday and Sunday from 11-6:30. You will progress SO FAST if you practice a lot. Trust me. Good luck man.
#11
I was your age when I got into my first band that was an original band with one cover(Sepultura slave new world) we practiced 3 times a week after work hours usually 6 to 10 luckily we knew a friend living in an industrial area. Now 10 years later am in a cover band and gigging a whole lot more(every weekend) compared to the odd gig with the original band. Its up to you how you want to go cover or originals both have pros and cons good luck man
#12
Quote by MarauderNL
Good thing I'm learning Paranoid right now, then.
But how much time is recommended for a starting band?

How long is a piece of string?
It's a different answer for each individual, but a good way to look at it is to say that to learn how to play guitar, you practice, but to learn how to play in a band, you practice with other people. It's really just a case of finding musicians of a similar playing level to yourself and jamming until you've gotten used to each others playing styles and timing and have started to tighten up or gell as a unit, then try writing stuff, either individualy or together as a band. Experiment, that way you'll expand your ability and experience.
That word 'experience' is important here, the more experience you have of playing in a band, the better you become at it, so find some more musicians and start getting experienced.
Personaly, I learned to play by jamming with buddies at a similar level to my own, (when I started, non of my mates could really play properly) rather than alone in my bedroom, whatever new technique or tune someone had learned, he then showed the rest of the lads and we all kinda learned, and taught each other, together. That way we all just naturaly progressed to bands.
Quote by MarauderNL

I'm sort of afraid that if we only practice once a week, we'll have forgotten half of it by the next session.

There's a simple answer to that, record the rehearsals, or rather, the end product of the rehearsals. Practice something until you have it as good as you can get it for the moment, then do a recording of it.
It doesn't need to be a good quality recording or anything, a portable cassette recorder with a cheap built in mic will suffice. Play around with it, placing it in different positions in your rehearsal room until you find the best place to put it where it will pick up most of what's going on. Then at the next rehearsal, before you start, play back what you did last week, and continue from where you left off.
As for the question of how much rehearsing you should be doing, again, it's a personal choice, but I'd say once or twice a week for about 3 hours per session is the norm. Personaly I prefer once a week as once a week is something to look forward to but twice a week can become a grind that cuts into your social life.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Mar 31, 2009,
#13
Wow, replies.
Well, our aspiring bassist finally managed to get his hands on a cheap bass 2 weeks ago. Now the drummer needs to get his **** together. Good thing he used to play back in the day and he knows his stuff. (AFAIK)

I guess every Saturday afternoon should work fine. We'll see how it works out.

One thing I'm worried about a lot though, is being able to play something original together. None of us have had any theory. Another mate of mine plays violin, he told me his classes started out basically as a bunch of people TRYING to play together.
I think I've got a pretty decent ear and I can make up some cool riffs and whatever. But I'm kinda afraid we'll sound like 4 dudes playing totally random wankings.
Or will stuff like that just take some time?
This is the part where you are supposed to be amazed by the awesomeness of my sig.
#14
Quote by MarauderNL


One thing I'm worried about a lot though, is being able to play something original together. None of us have had any theory. Another mate of mine plays violin, he told me his classes started out basically as a bunch of people TRYING to play together.
I think I've got a pretty decent ear and I can make up some cool riffs and whatever. But I'm kinda afraid we'll sound like 4 dudes playing totally random wankings.
Or will stuff like that just take some time?

It just takes time.
Having theory is nice, but it's not essential, I myself cannot read a note of music, not even tab, and I don't even know the names of half the notes or chords I'm playing. (as well as singing for Slack Babbath, I also play bass with another band) I simply learned to play by ear alone and I've just got used to playing like that over the years.
I think that brings cirtain advantages with it too, for instance all someone needs to do it either play something on the guitar or a recording of something once and I can repeat it practicaly straight away.
#15
to start with it will sound liek like that
but then you get accustomed to what your strengths are
and what you want to sound like
then it all gets better from there
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