#1
Hey, I'm looking into majoring in guitar at college, but I can't find any that really focus on it. I don't really mean jazz guitar, or classical, but something more contemporary.
Although, I wouldn't mind taking jazz courses.

I know about Mcnally Smith, Berklee, and MI, but what are some others?
#2
Well first off, this might sound a bit rude, but dont waste your time studying guitar in a college setting if youre not going to do jazz or classical.

Although there is alot of Metal Heads now in contemporary schools.

The New School (manhatten school of music), University of North Texas. If you type in contemporary music schools in google/wikipedia alot more will come up.
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#3
alot of people out now are classically trained so you might wanna do that
#4
go for jazz, once you can play it, you can play pretty much anything else.
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#5
Quote by aetherspear
go for jazz, once you can play it, you can play pretty much anything else.


i'm gonna have to dissagree..

how do you figure?
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#6
Perhaps what he's saying is that, compared to classical, the normal jazz curriculum / techniques are more applicable to contemporary styles.


Anyway I can agree with BBell - I don't think it's worth it if you're not doing jazz or classical, because those are what you'll be taught. If that's not your area of interest, you're better off not going to college, working and taking lessons and pursuing the sounds that interest you.
#7
imo both are very applicable BUT i think classical will be better used in contemporary then jazz would
but thats just my opinion.

TS i also think if your not a huge fan of either then classical will be your best bet.
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#8
Quote by BBell

The New School (manhatten school of music), University of North Texas. If you type in contemporary music schools in google/wikipedia alot more will come up.


The New School isn't a part of Manhattan School of Music, though the tuition is oddly similar...
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#9
took me long enough to read this, i kinda forgot about it.


i do get what you're saying about not wanting to take jazz or classical in college, and that being kind of pointless, but don't get me wrong. I have great respect for them, and i'm not even close to a metal head. I play lots of blues and funk.

are there any school based around that?
#10
yea they study it, but blues and funk aren't deep enough for you to spend 4 years studying.
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#11
In my honest opinion its a waste of time.
So many people that are excelling in the music industry have no formal college training. Take your favorite artists, or even artists that are not famous but making a living, MANY do not have a music degree. Most have a different degree and worked hard enough to become good at music on their own terms.

I have just completed 1 year at Minnesota State University and although I did learn a lot, I also learned that a normal degree will give me a career, and music can ALWAYS be a side job. I have a backup plan just in case my music does not come through.

Trust me, learn on your own. Don't waste time in a school for that.

My 2 cents


PS - I'm not saying don't take some courses, that would be great if you can afford it, but my opinion is dont go for the degree.
If you're going to get a music degree, do it from a school that really matters like Berklee, and possibly McNally Smith
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#12
Quote by Blurry 505
In my honest opinion its a waste of time.
So many people that are excelling in the music industry have no formal college training. Take your favorite artists, or even artists that are not famous but making a living, MANY do not have a music degree. Most have a different degree and worked hard enough to become good at music on their own terms.

I have just completed 1 year at Minnesota State University and although I did learn a lot, I also learned that a normal degree will give me a career, and music can ALWAYS be a side job. I have a backup plan just in case my music does not come through.

Trust me, learn on your own. Don't waste time in a school for that.

My 2 cents


PS - I'm not saying don't take some courses, that would be great if you can afford it, but my opinion is dont go for the degree.
If you're going to get a music degree, do it from a school that really matters like Berklee, and possibly McNally Smith


I agree to some extent. But not everyone wants to be a rockstar. You don't have to be a performer to have a career in music. Don't insult people by calling it a waste of time, thats pretty ignorant.
#13
Quote by Grey Dynasty
took me long enough to read this, i kinda forgot about it.


i do get what you're saying about not wanting to take jazz or classical in college, and that being kind of pointless, but don't get me wrong. I have great respect for them, and i'm not even close to a metal head. I play lots of blues and funk.

are there any school based around that?


Jazz is more connected to blues and funk than you think.
#14
The topic of the thread is him wanting a degree in guitar, not any other aspect of music. Although you look at other careers and many of them don't have degrees either. I dont mean to insult anybody, I just want the threadstarter to think really hard before making a decision like this.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#15
Ultimately, it comes down to what you want to do with that degree. If your goal is to be a kick-ass player, then go wherever offers the instructors you most wish to study with.

If your goal is to have a marketable job skill, or an academic qualification that will get you into a professional school like Law school or teachers' college, then you'd best go to an academic institution, as opposed to an applied institution. In other words, academic institutions will invariably focus on classical and/or jazz. An applied institution like Berklee or something may well NOT give you the required academic background.

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