#1
so, i am going to buy new pickups for my '02 sg special
specifically seymour duncan sh-1 ('59 model) for the neck and sh-4 for the bridge.
on measuring the pole spacing on both pickups to decide if i needed humbuckers or trembuckers, i realised that the current 490T stock bridge pickup has a weird pole spacing of about 52mm, not 49mm like the neck one or 53.6mm as a (standard?) trem/f-spaced pickup.
on further reading, other people are having this issue, and was wondering if anyone could clarify why it arose as of late 1980s?!?
also, should i get the humbucker(49mm) or trembucker (53.6mm) version of the sh-4?
will it cover the strings appropriately and generate an appropriate magnetic field for the breadth of my strings?

cheers,
andy
#3
by TOM dyou mean Tune-O-Matic?
cos i think my sg special came with one of those.
it looks like this

wiki link

but i have tried to adjust the saddle in order to make the strings sit over the poles, but it can't be done!
#4
They really don't have to be perfectly over the pole pieces. I had a regular spaced Seymour Duncan in my Epiphone Explorer (it needs a trembucker) for a little while and it sounded fine. It looked a little funny cause the strings and poles didn't line up though. For your Gibson a regular spaced humbucker should be close enough for it to sound good and look good too. And yes I meant Tune-O-Matic I was just too lazy to type it.
#5
TOM= Tune O Matic, it's just much faster to type.

Anyway... Yeah, I'd get a normal one. I'm buying some SD's soon so I did some research and Epi's DO need the wider spaced pickup.
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