#1
Alright, so from what i've been taught from my guitar teacher if you were to solo over something in lets say E major, to use the minor pentatonic you would use the C# minor pentatonic, E's relative minor, correct?

Now i've been looking around on youtube and trying to play over these backing blues tracks in E. So i start using the C# minor pentatonic. In blues, when they refer to playing in E does that mean E minor or something? because everyone is saying to use the E minor pentatonic/blues scale, and infact when plaing over it, it sounds more correct..

here are a few video examples, please clear this up for me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGR_O3kB1NQ&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_a1CrsC8TLs

another example is in a video i found last night. a guy says he's jamming in A#...they begin to solo over it in the A# minor pentatonic. I'm just 10000% confused now..
#2
Although Emaj and C#min are enharmonic (they contain the same notes), the tonic and the chord progressions are different - if you play a C#min scale over a backing track of an Emaj chord, stopping on C# doesn't resolve. If you play it over a C#min chord, it will.
Last edited by moonlightdrive at Feb 11, 2009,
#3
I think you're doing your pentatonic scale wrong, because E major sounds fine over the first one.

Easy reference point. The top note of your pentatonic scale is the root for Major pentatonic.

I.E.

In A minor, the root is the fifth fret of the highest string. The note above that in the minor pentatonic is C, therefore the A minor pentatonic is also the C major pentatonic.
#4
Im kind of confused too I always thought when they said just E they meant you could use E major and minor scales anything in the key of E
#5
When they say something like "a progression in E blues", that would refer to either E blues, or E minor pentatonic, depending on which one you want to play, but they both should work.

Now if they said "a progression in E major", then you'd have to play in C# blues or C# minor pentatonic.

Regarding the guy who says he's playing A#, he may have forgotten to mention he's playing in A# BLUES, and not A# major (the progression of A# blues and not the progression of A# major)

But if they say blues, then it's minor pentatonic/blues scale of the same root note of the progression. If they say major, then it's the 6th interval of the major (or as you know it, 3 frets behind your root of the major), and you have to play in that relative minor to make it sound good.

A study over modes of the major scale will probably help you understand things better or make this clearer.
#6
Most of the time when you're jaming over BLUES, you want to use the blues/pentatonic scale. If someone were to tell me we're jaming over blues an "A", i would probably use the A pentatonic/blues scale. An "A" dorian sometimes works well too.

At your guitar lessons your teacher is probably using a rock backing track in E major, so he's correct...C# minor pentatonic works well for that
Last edited by Guitar247 at Feb 11, 2009,
#7
YOu can use the relative minor, but it's a bit tricky. You have to find the right licks. If you like guns n' roses check out used to love her. The song is in D major, but Slash uses licks clearly from the Bminor pentatonic. That progression is about as bluesy a progression you're gonna find.

Also check out the last solo in Rocket Queen. That part of the song is in Emajor, but slash solos out of the C# minor pentatonic.

*note that both of those solos are technically in their respective major keys, NOT in the minor keys. I only mention the minor keys for purpose of clarity. He's using those shapes that are probably more familiar to most guitarists as being minor/blues pentatonic licks.

Hope that helped.

EDIT: just checked out the first video. That progression is a bit tricky. It starts off with something that is more of a Major Blues progression in which C# minor blues or E major blues works well. However it makes an awkward switch to a G and then an A. C# doesn't really sound good over that. That could be your source of confusion.
Traynor YCV50 Blue
epi les paul w/ SD Alnico II pros
Dunlop Slash Wah
EH Deluxe Memory Boy
Moen Jimi Vibe
Danelectro Cool Cat Fuzz
Zvex Vexter Fuzz Factory
VHT 2x12 w/ V30's
Last edited by psychokiller99 at Feb 11, 2009,
#8
You guys cleared it out perfectly that's what i thought. Emajor going to the relative minor but also depending on the progression etc.

But yeah the blues thing kind of slayed me, thanks for all the helpful replies
#9
Quote by Markese
Alright, so from what i've been taught from my guitar teacher if you were to solo over something in lets say E major, to use the minor pentatonic you would use the C# minor pentatonic, E's relative minor, correct?

Now i've been looking around on youtube and trying to play over these backing blues tracks in E. So i start using the C# minor pentatonic. In blues, when they refer to playing in E does that mean E minor or something? because everyone is saying to use the E minor pentatonic/blues scale, and infact when plaing over it, it sounds more correct..

here are a few video examples, please clear this up for me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGR_O3kB1NQ&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_a1CrsC8TLs

another example is in a video i found last night. a guy says he's jamming in A#...they begin to solo over it in the A# minor pentatonic. I'm just 10000% confused now..

Sorry, but your teacher isn't a great teacher - at least as far as his theory knowledge goes.

You almost never "play" the relative minor - relative minor is just a term to describe the relationship between the keys.

If you're in the key of E major, as in you have a chord progression that resolves to E major, you CANNOT "play the relative minor" - you've got the notes E F# G# A B C# D# , it doesn't matter what shape or order you play them in, they're E major.

Now, if your progression resloves to the chord C# minor then yes, those notes are C# minor scale, but then you're in the key of C# minor, not E major.

Now, using the PARALLEL minor is a common melodic device in rock and blues music, so if you're inthe key of E major you CAN use E minor pentatonic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Wow... reading all that is going to be confusing to a lot of ppl.. heck you've got me confused and I understnd it.. I think... or do I?

Anyway... if your just starting scales and soloing, more often than not you want to sound decent as quickly as possible..... this is no excuse not to learn the theory, but heres a quicky.

The simple pentatonic scale... drawn on the link below.... will work about 80% of the time if you simply play the scale starting on the bass note of the first chord in your progression. E blues is usually some combo of E A and B... the pattern doesn't even matter if you feel it... therefore the plane jane pentatonic scale will work starting at the 12th fret on the E string or at the open fret.

http://leagueofguitarists.com/images/pentatonic%20scale%201st%20pos.GIF

I'm sure I'll get flamed for over simplifying, but what I've just put there pretty much covers 3/4's of 70s rock guitar.
2001 Gibson USA Les Paul Studio Black/Gold
2008 Alvarez-Yairi DY40C
2004 Taylor 310
Marshall AVT275

Ex guits 2002 Ovation Elite, 1995 Seagull 12 BC Rich Gunslinger Snakeskin Various Yamaha Various Sammick Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone ES