#1
Anyone into classical? I've been wanting to check out those two composers for a while, so, which of their works should I start with? Any recommendations?
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#3
John Cage is the Mars Volta of classical music, very experimental.

He played a sold out show where he only did one song called "4:33" basically he just sat at the piano and didnt play anything for four minutes and 33 seconds. In another show he and several other people switched radio stations to create an insane song.
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Last edited by The Master Plan at Feb 11, 2009,
#4
i studied those in year 12, they werent necessarily classical but 20th and 21st century.

Igor Stravinsky i remember was quite awesome thought. Cage was a bit too far left field for me.
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#5
Currently one of his pieces is going to be played for the next 639 years.

ime for John Cage

The world’s longest performance of a piece of music is being played in Germany, and it will go on playing for another 639 years.

John Cage's composition ASLSP, or to give it its full title As Slow As Possible, is part of what organisers have described as ‘a revolution in slowness.’

Famously quoted as saying, ‘if my work is accepted I must move on to the point where it isn’t’, Cage continually pushed back artistic boundaries and led audiences to the edge of reason.


ASLSP

Now, nine years after his death, the memory of Cage most certainly lives on.

Last week, The John Cage Project launched what they claim will be the world's longest musical recital.

Organ2/ASLSP is due to be performed on the town organ in Halberstadt in northern Germany over a decidedly leisurely 639 years.

Apparently some 360 spectators, paid DM30 (UK£10) to see the recital's organist inflate his instrument's bellows and they'll have to come back in another 18 months time in order to hear him play the first chord - and one each year or so thereafter.

Providing that sponsors can be found, the performance is scheduled to reach its finale in 2640, with a half time interval planned in 2319.

Time

Although Cage originally wrote ASLSP in 1992 as a 20-minute piece for piano, for many years musicologists have deliberated over just how slow, as slow as possible really is.

Whilst purists have argued that time is infinite, the John Cage Organ Foundation agreed on the figure of 639 years to correspond with the number of years since the construction of Germany’s first block single organ.

The performance has been presented as the ultimate antidote to a fast paced world. As organiser, Michael Betzle, has explained:

‘The long period of time is supposed to form a contrast to the breathless pace of change in the modern-day world.’

It is certainly very slow, but as music critic Michael White, explains this is not necessarily how John Cage intended the music to be performed:

‘It is in the spirit of John Cage… he was an outrageous character, in a sense, he was the emperor of the avant-garde.’

‘His whole life was spent creating events and happenings… they were meant for you to go away and think about some principal or philosophical idea that each piece embodied and reflected.’


When asked about his thoughts on death, John Cage famously replied:

‘That's a mystery the solution of which interests me very much.’
#7
neither of which, btw, are considered "Classical"

Classical is Mozart, Haydn, etc

from 1750 - 18(20) (or 1850, it all depends on who you ask)

Neither of which are from that time


aside from that, Stravinsky is by far my favorite composer, followed closely by Debussey


John Cage however I can not stand
If you ask me he is basically a tool who just writes BS and calls it brilliant.
I realize that by defintion everything he writes is "music" but I'd listen to Merzbow (of the Noise Genre) over him any day.


listen to The Rite of Spring by Stravinsky (probably his most well known work)

If you like that keep looking

also you may want to look up Rimsky Korsakov who was essentially Stravinsky's teacher


on a side note, I convinced my girlfreind to name her Hamster Stravinsky.
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Last edited by NaivexLi at Feb 11, 2009,
#8
I listen to John Cage when I want a nice long rest..

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#9
Did Stravinksy do Rite of Spring? Or was that Debussey?
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#10
Quote by sloppyjoe109
Did Stravinksy do Rite of Spring? Or was that Debussey?
Stravinsky composed Rite of Spring. It's an incredible piece. It really pushed the boundaries of what could be done with music back then. People actually rioted at its premier.
#11
Quote by DorkusMalorkus
Currently one of his pieces is going to be played for the next 639 years.

wait, does the chord continually play for the whole time, or is it just one chord that fades, wait a year, then another? if its constant sustain, thats awesome. if it is just separated chords, thats pretty lame.
.
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I have no opinion on this matter.
#12
Quote by JoshXXXXX
Stravinsky composed Rite of Spring. It's an incredible piece. It really pushed the boundaries of what could be done with music back then. People actually rioted at its premier.



back then?!
Hell its pushing boundaries now

he basically took the concept of measure lines and threw them out the window

normally, if you're in lets say 4/4 time you put stress on beat 1 and 3

he basically said "no... I want stress here....and here....and here"


not to mention putting instruments at odd ends of their range like the amazing Bassoon solo (I'm sure you know what I'm talking about if you know Rites of Spring, its about the most famous part)
its at the end of the Bassoon range


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uMfXh4OOx8&feature=channel_page
for anyone who wants it


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrwqOYKrx3E&feature=channel_page
also
Eric Whittaker if you're into Choral music


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NaivexLi is anything but naive. His post was a pretty good source of info.


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#13
The Rite of Spring.

I witnessed it live back in December. One of the best performances I've ever been to (besides NIN).
#14
Quote by Zugunruhe
wait, does the chord continually play for the whole time, or is it just one chord that fades, wait a year, then another? if its constant sustain, thats awesome. if it is just separated chords, thats pretty lame.

If I remember right, they use bricks to keep the organ keys held down the entire time. I could be wrong, though.

I'm fond of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, like many others in the thread. You might also recognize his Firebird Suite from Fantasia 2000, another piece I like quite a bit. Outside of those two, I'm not wonderfully familiar with Stravinsky.
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#15
Quote by The Master Plan
John Cage is the Mars Volta of classical music, very experimental.

He played a sold out show where he only did one song called "4:33" basically he just sat at the piano and didnt play anything for four minutes and 33 seconds. In another show he and several other people switched radio stations to create an insane song.


4:33 is the stupidest thing I have ever heard (or not heard?). I'm not saying all music by John Cage is bad because I haven't listened to it.
#16
Quote by JoshXXXXX
Stravinsky composed Rite of Spring. It's an incredible piece. It really pushed the boundaries of what could be done with music back then. People actually rioted at its premier.


Yeah man I bet. It is literally EPIC.
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#18
John cage sucks. I can't belive that he's gotten this famous, and yes I have listend to his work. He's famous for being wierd and providing little to know benificial listening. Anyone who says that they like him his either pretending or just convincing themselves that they do. Stravinsky was differant though, he's one of my favorites.
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#19
im best friends with Stravinsky's great grandson. his family has a good amount of money passed down to them, and even more from a lawsuit with Disney for using one of Igor's songs in fantasia or something. I've listened to some of Stravinsky's work and even though im not into classical, i liked what i've heard by him.
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#20
IMO, Cage is a horrible composer. Just pure arrogance... I respect him for what he did in exploring the field of music, but seriously, his best known works are "4:33" & "ASLSP"
That being said, I have an album of his - "Sonatas & Interludes for Prepared Piano" It's alright, listenable....

Contemporary wise, Philip Glass is quite good. As is Charles Ives...

Classical - I'd recommend Rachmaninov, Vivaldi & Tchaikovsky... But you'd find pieces by each composer that you'll like
#21
for a minute there I was about to yell SHADOW KICK
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#22
Franz Liszt FTW. I enjoy his stuff. Hes probably know mostly for his Hungarian Rhapsody no. 2. Sadly... more commonly known as the piano duet between Donald and Daffy Duck in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit."
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#23
"Ignor" Stravinsky? Is that Igor Stravinsky's retarded deformed brother or something?

Anyways, Stravinsky's Firebird Suite is a great piece of work. I am not a fan of John Cage though.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#24
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Did Stravinksy do Rite of Spring? Or was that Debussey?


no but that first theme was inspired by the prelude to Afternoon of a Faun of Debussy.