#1
I'm thinking of getting some EMGs for one of my Ibanez guitars. How long do the batteries last with active pickups? I don't want to be unscrewing the back all the time.
Ibanez SZ320MH WBR (2004)
Ibanez RG320FM TL (2007)
JHS Vintage: V6SB (2000)
Tanglewood AJ870 AVS (1998)
Roland Cube 30X (2009)
#3
If you unplug the guitar when you aren't playing, they could last you about a year. I personally swap mine every 6 months just so I keep the sound consistent.
WTLTL 2011
#4
Quote by Mark G
If you unplug the guitar when you aren't playing, they could last you about a year. I personally swap mine every 6 months just so I keep the sound consistent.


+1.
I think the EMG site gives how many hours they last though.
#5
Aprox 1500 hours per 9v battery, some people have a setup with two 9v's.
Gibson 1972 SG Pro T-Top Bridge, P90 Neck
Dean DBD T ML
Jackson JS30RR EMGs 85-81
Epiphone G-400 Goth
76 Mann Les Paul Custom
Fender f-230 Accoustic
Randall RG-180 DX
Line6 Spider III HD75 Head - Behringer 412
Saving for a Marshall JCM 800.
#6
Changing the battery on my guitar is a pain in the ass. The cavity for the battery is barely large enough to fit the battery let alone my fingers and the input doesen't raise out of the cavity.

Took me like 1 hour to get the damned thing in, anyone know an easier way? My guitar is in my sig.
#7
Try out some good passives before you go EMG. So many kids are going with EMG's now and end up trying good passives later and regret it. I was one of those people. It's amazing what a good passive can do. If you upgrade from ****ty stock passives then emg's sound great but when you get a good passive it sounds even better and you don't have to worry about batteries.
#8
Im lucky, I have a nice big compartment to put my battery in, Just gotta wrap it in foam from the Box of the pups, and it doesnt move, stays nice and snug, only thing is, it cost me $140 to get them put in due to the lack of a schematic for the wiring to a RR guitar, All in all Its a love-hate relationship with them. Quick connect is awesome. though.
Gibson 1972 SG Pro T-Top Bridge, P90 Neck
Dean DBD T ML
Jackson JS30RR EMGs 85-81
Epiphone G-400 Goth
76 Mann Les Paul Custom
Fender f-230 Accoustic
Randall RG-180 DX
Line6 Spider III HD75 Head - Behringer 412
Saving for a Marshall JCM 800.
#9
Quote by kpatterson14206
Changing the battery on my guitar is a pain in the ass. The cavity for the battery is barely large enough to fit the battery let alone my fingers and the input doesen't raise out of the cavity.

Took me like 1 hour to get the damned thing in, anyone know an easier way? My guitar is in my sig.


I thought those guitars came with emgs, or like dirty fingers pickups.. there both good
#10
I've never had a problem putting the battery in a guitar. I just put it in the back with the rest of the stuff. It never makes anything short out or anything like that. Back when I used emg's I did this in many guitars.
#12
Quote by hcsn2008
Try out some good passives before you go EMG. So many kids are going with EMG's now and end up trying good passives later and regret it. I was one of those people. It's amazing what a good passive can do. If you upgrade from ****ty stock passives then emg's sound great but when you get a good passive it sounds even better and you don't have to worry about batteries.


I wouldn't say you exactly need to worry about batteries. They don't need changing for quite some time.
#13
Quote by darkcheef
and im just gonna get emg's passsive pickups to not wory about the battery


Well if you are going to get passive pickups man don't get EMG's. Get yourself a Dimarzio D sonic or Dimarzio X2n.

Please go to dimarzio.com and click humbuckers at the bottom and then high output. Do YOURSELF a favor. I know you're probably new to it and you've been seeing emg's around but trust me on this. Dimarzio are cheaper and better.

Go check out the x2n first because I think that's what you're going to like. The d sonic is my favorite because it's their thickest. They are only like 79 bucks. no batteries. You cannot tell an x2n is not an active pickup.
#14
^ You can. It's not as responsive as an active. Great pickup, and great tone though. Dimarzio are really good. EMGs are good for really high output chug and tight treble, and (yeah, people are gonna disagree), have a pretty nice warm clean tone.
But DiMarzio passive = no routing for a battery, unless you put the battery for EMG in the control cavity (depends if you have enough space in there).


Also, with a cube, I wouldn't go EMG anyway. Well. I did, I regret it now. Solidstate amps clip the output from EMG, and they lose response. End up muddy, especially if you push mids up, I've found, with my cube. Get a new amp before you consider a pup change. It won't make enough difference in your tone to be worth it.
#15
If there's eniugh room in the cavity you can buy a battery carrier that can be mounted into a cavity cover with some modification. It'll allow you to pull out the battery without having to undo screws all the time and risk stripping the holes!
Moving on.....
Last edited by KenG at Feb 12, 2009,
#16
Quote by Mazzakazza
^ You can. It's not as responsive as an active. Great pickup, and great tone though. Dimarzio are really good. EMGs are good for really high output chug and tight treble, and (yeah, people are gonna disagree), have a pretty nice warm clean tone.
But DiMarzio passive = no routing for a battery, unless you put the battery for EMG in the control cavity (depends if you have enough space in there).


Also, with a cube, I wouldn't go EMG anyway. Well. I did, I regret it now. Solidstate amps clip the output from EMG, and they lose response. End up muddy, especially if you push mids up, I've found, with my cube. Get a new amp before you consider a pup change. It won't make enough difference in your tone to be worth it.


Well a lot of people say get a new amp... I own a ton of high gain high wattage amps and I own some solid state practice amps. The reason I need good pickups is because I have to have clarity. For example if I keep my stock pickups even in my soldi state practice amp it sounds muddy and my notes aren't clear so I can't play well. So a pickup change sometimes is very useful even on a practice amp.

The thing about EMG's is they don't have much low end. Compared to other passives anyway. That's why I say get the d sonic. It has the high end harmonics and still has the killer warm low end that you want.

It sounds amazing through my tube amps and amazing through my practice amps. But currently im practicing with a vypyr 60 tube so im getting that tube feel too.
#17
How do u swap them?
Fender 72 Tele Thinline (my baby)
Gibson SG Special Faded
ESP LTD M-1000
Peavy Vk 112
Boss GT-10
#18
Pup change really won't do much on the cube. I run EMG 707s on an rg1527 through a Cube 60 right now, and it's pretty muddy. Believe me, I've played with the EQ as much as anyone ever could, even through a friend's eq pedal to try and balance out some of it...It's really not that great, so I have to cut gain and presence, which is really not the sound I'm looking for.

Also, I'd have to disagree that EMGs have not much low end. Tried out my rg1527 (7 string) through a valve amp the other week, the low B sounded great, really pulled tight and snappy, with crunch and definition. Or were you talking about EMG passives? I've never tried them, but only heard bad things, but tbh, I don't know them at all.


^EDIT: Swap what? Pickups? You need to take out the old ones and solder new ones in - it's a pretty simple procedure.

EDITEDIT: Except new EMGs, apparently they're coming with some kinda plug which you just plug straight into the pup? For easy swapping, apparently. I have no idea though, mine don't have that.
Last edited by Mazzakazza at Feb 12, 2009,
#19
Quote by Mazzakazza
Pup change really won't do much on the cube. I run EMG 707s on an rg1527 through a Cube 60 right now, and it's pretty muddy. Believe me, I've played with the EQ as much as anyone ever could, even through a friend's eq pedal to try and balance out some of it...It's really not that great, so I have to cut gain and presence, which is really not the sound I'm looking for.

Also, I'd have to disagree that EMGs have not much low end. Tried out my rg1527 (7 string) through a valve amp the other week, the low B sounded great, really pulled tight and snappy, with crunch and definition. Or were you talking about EMG passives? I've never tried them, but only heard bad things, but tbh, I don't know them at all.


^EDIT: Swap what? Pickups? You need to take out the old ones and solder new ones in - it's a pretty simple procedure.

EDITEDIT: Except new EMGs, apparently they're coming with some kinda plug which you just plug straight into the pup? For easy swapping, apparently. I have no idea though, mine don't have that.



No I am talking EMG actives. I have emg 81's in some of my guitars still. The low end sucks compared to passive good pickups. The reason why is because the passives work more with the wood of the guitar. So having mahogany wood guitars like I do the passives sound really thick. Where as the emg sound sterile. Nowhere near as much low end. I think you were getting more of the low end from the amp. And there will be low end using emg's with a tube amp no doubt. I'm just saying there isn't as much. It isn't as warm.

Try using an EMG and then go use a dimarzio x2n or dsonic passive. You'll be amazed at how much low end they have. I even have quite a few stock pickups that have much more low end than the emg's. That's what kills me about them. I guess if you are used to them and are not used to the other pickups I mentioned you'd think it has a lot of low end and it wouldn't bother you. It used to not bother me when I had emg's. But then when I got used to good passives I tried to play my guitars with emg's in it and just can't. And I remember when I first got emg's I thought it sounded amazing.

Just don't get used to a good passive and you'll still like them. But if you ever get a good passive in some thick wood you'll have a hard time playing an emg. You'll miss the warmth and low end.